oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Effect of Duration of Cooking of Lablab purpureus Beans on the Performance Organ Weight and Haematological Parameters of Shika-brown Pullet Chicks  [PDF]
F.O. Abeke,S.O. Ogundipe,S. Oladele,A.A. Sekoni
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: The effect of duration of cooking of Lablab purpureus beans on the performance, organ weight and haematological parameters of Shika-brown pullet chicks from 0-8 weeks was investigated. Eight dietary treatments of which seven in which Lablab purpureus beans cooked for 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min) was included and a control (Corn-Soyacake-Groundnut-cake based diet) were formulated. These were replicated three times with 25 birds per replicate in a complete randomized design. The birds were managed under the deep litter system. Results obtained showed that cooking time had significant (p< 0.05) improvement on performance characteristics such as final weight, weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and percent mortality. Organ weights such as the liver, the heart and the pancreas decreased as the duration of cooking increased while haematological parameters such as the Total Protein (TP) the Packed Cell Volume (PCV) and the Haemoglobin (Hb) increased slightly, (although not significantly) in the blood up to about 30 min of cooking before decreasing as the duration of cooking continued to increase. These observations are indications that higher durations of cooking up to about 30 min render the nutrients in the raw lablab seeds more available for utilization by the birds.
Effect of Dietary Levels of Cooked Lablab purpureus Beans on the Performance of Broiler Chickens
F.O. Abeke,S.O. Ogundipe,A.A. Sekoni,I.A. Adeyinka
American Journal of Food Technology , 2008,
Abstract: A study was conducted to determine the response of broiler starter and finisher chicks to dietary levels of Lablab purpureus beans processed by boiling in water for 30 min at 100 °C. For both the starter and the finisher phases, seven isonitrogenous diets containing 23.78% crude protein for the starter and 20.91% crude protein for the finisher were formulated to contain lablab seed meal at 0.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 30.0% levels respectively. Diet 1, in each phase had no lablab and served as the control. Each dietary treatment for the starter and the finisher phases was replicated three times in a completely randomized design. There were 25 birds per replicate. Feed and water were given ad libitum. The experiment lasted from 0 to 4 weeks for the starter phase and from 5 to 8 weeks for the finisher phase. Results obtained for the starter phase shows significant (p<0.05) depression in final weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency and feed-gain ratio. These parameters decreased as the level of lablab seeds in the diets increased. However, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) reduced as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the starter diets. The results obtained for the finisher phase also showed a similar trend. While there were significant (p<0.05) decreases in final weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the diets, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) lowered. Parameters measured for carcass analysis such as live weight and weights of the breast, thigh, wing, neck, legs and head showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease as the dietary levels of lablab seed meal increased. The PCV, Hb and the TP status of the blood indicated significant (p<0.05) decreases as the levels of lablab in the diets increased. However, Lablab purpureus beans can be included up to 5% level in broiler starter and up to 10% level in broiler finisher diets without any adverse effect on the performance of the birds.
Nutritive value of Stylosanthes guianensis and Lablab purpureus as sole feed for growing rabbits
AJ Omole, A Adejuyigbe, FT Ajayi, JB Fapohunda
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2007,
Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritive value of Stylosanthes guianensis and Lablab purpureus as sole feed for growing rabbit. Thirty-six cross-bred growing rabbits of mean weight 515 ± 2.3g were used for the study. The animals were randomly allotted to 3 different treatments. The animals in T1 were fed S. guanensis only, while animals in T2 and T3 were fed solely on L. purpureus and sunflower leaf (control), respectively. Feed intake and weight gain were measured on daily and weekly basis respectively. The results showed that rabbits fed S. guanensis and L. purpureus compared favourably with those fed sunflower leaf in terms of feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio. The results also revealed that the nutrients digestibility (dry matter, crude protein and crude fibre) were also better in rabbit fed S. guanensis and L. purpureus. The dressing percent, lung weight, heart and kidney weight were not affected by the dietary treatment.
Assessment of Lablab (Lablab Purpureus) Leaf Meal as a Feed Ingredient and Yolk Colouring Agent in the Diet of Layers
A. A. Odunsi
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2003,
Abstract: A feeding experiment was conducted to determine the performance, nutrient digestibility and egg quality of layers fed 0,50, 100 or 150 g/kg leaf meal of Lablab purpureus (lablab) Chemical analysis of lablab gave (g/kg) crude protein 234.0, ether extract 19.0, crude fibre 83.4, ash 116.0 and nitrogen free extracts 467.0. Feeding lablab at 100 and 150 g/kg significantly reduced feed intake and egg production while egg weight, feed conversion efficiency and body weight changes were not affected (p>0.05) by dietary treatments. Apparent nutrient digestibility of dry matter and crude protein decreased significantly (p<0.05) with lablab while ether extract was not significantly influenced. Internal and external egg quality values were comparable amongst dietary groups except for yolk colour, which was significantly higher (p<0.05) in layers fed lablab compared to those without. Diet and boiling had no significant effect (p>0.05) on the proportion of egg components but boiling effected a percentage reduction of 62, 56 and 52 in the egg yolk colour of 50, 100 and 150 g/kg lablab fed layers respectively. The persistence of the colour change after withdrawal of lablab ranged from 5 days (50 g/kg) to 15 days (150 g/kg). Based on egg quality, lack of mortality and similar biological efficiency, it may be possible to include lablab in layer diets up to 100 and 150 g/kg in situations of acute scarcity and/or high cost of grain and concentrates.
Response of Proximate Composition of Lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) Herbage to Phosphorus Application, Cutting Height and Age of Cutting
S.A. Ogedegbe,V.B. Ogunlela,E.C. Odion,O.O. Olufajo
Research Journal of Agronomy , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjagr.2011.20.27
Abstract: In order to evaluate the response of lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) proximate composition to phosphorus application, cutting height and age of cutting, field trials were conducted at Samaru, Nigeria in the 2006-2008 wet seasons. The treatments were composed of factorial combinations of 4 rates of phosphorus application (0, 12, 24 and 36 kg P ha-1), 2 cutting heights (10 and 20 cm) as the main plot and 4 cutting ages (6, 12, 18 weeks and at maturity) as the sub-plot a split plot design with three replications. The highest crude protein and crude fibre concentrations of lablab herbage were obtained at the 12 weeks and maturity stages of cutting, respectively and both parameters were enhanced by advanced age of cutting. Lablab ether extract concentration decreased as age of cutting increased and cutting age did not improve ether extract concentration. A phosphorus application rate of 12 kg P ha-1 produced the highest ether extract concentration in lablab herbage when age of cutting was 6 weeks. Crude protein concentration of lablab was highest at the 0 P application rate combined with cutting at 6 weeks age while crude fibre was highest when lablab received no phosphorus application and was cut at maturity. It is suggested that lablab herbage be fed prior to maturity in order to reduce minimize crude protein loss.
Growth and Growth Attributes of Lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) as Influenced by Phosphorus Application, Cutting Height and Age of Cutting
S.A. Ogedegbe,V.B. Ogunlela,E.C. Odion,O.O. Olufajo
Research Journal of Agronomy , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjagr.2011.10.19
Abstract: With a view to studying the response growth and growth attributes of lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) to phosphorus application, cutting height and cutting age field trials were conducted during the 2006-2008 wet seasons at Samaru, Nigeria. The treatments were composed of factorial combinations of four rates of phosphorus application (0, 12, 24 and 36 kg P ha-1), two cutting heights (10 and 20 cm) and four ages of cutting (6, 12, 18 weeks and at maturity) in a split plot design with three replications. Application of 12 kg P ha-1 increased lablab sward height slightly (4%) while applying 24 kg P ha-1 increased leaf area index by 10%, number of root nodules by 42% and nodule dry weight by 50% over the zero-P control. Cutting lablab to a 20 cm stubble produced significantly taller sward. The highest sward obtained by cutting fodder at 18 weeks, a treatment that also produced the fastest relative regeneration rate. A combination of 36 kg P ha-1 and 20 cm cutting height produced the highest sward. The highest number of root nodules was obtained when lablab was given 24 kg P ha-1 and cut to a stubble height of 10 cm. Intensive management of lablab growth should be carried out within 12 WAS for the overall benefit of the crop. Cutting or grazing treatment either of which may prolong the vegetative stage of lablab is also required to manage its leaf area index for better crop growth.
Agronomic Performance and Sensory Evaluation of Lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) Accessions for Human Consumption in Uganda
Peace Kankwatsa, Robert Muzira
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1104481
Abstract:
Lablab (Lablab purpureus) germplasm was evaluated to identify high grain yielding and palatable accessions that were suitable for human consumption in Uganda. A preference analysis was done to identify accessions that had a high probability of being accepted by farmers. Accessions 29399, 29400, 29803, 30701, 31364, CQ3620, Q5427, Q6988, 52518B, Q6880B, 31364, CQ3621 and Lablab Uganda had high yields, which partly resulted from their high tolerance of the prevailing stresses (diseases, pests and low soil moisture). Accessions 29400, Lablab Uganda, Njahi. 29399, 36019, Q5427, Q6988, 30701 and 31364 scored highly based on the sensory attributes. Accessions Lablab Uganda, Njahi, 29400 and Q69887 were the most accepted for adoption by farmers based on their high agronomic performance. Lablab Uganda, Njahi, 29400 and Q69887 had the most preferred palatability characteristics for human consumption.
Utilization of Arachis hypogea (Groundnut) and Lablab purpureus (lablab) Forage Meal Fed Sole or Mixed by Growing Rabbits
T. Iyeghe-Erakpotobor, G.
Tropicultura , 2012,
Abstract: Thirty-six crossbred growing rabbits were used to evaluate performance of rabbits on sole and mixed forage meals in a 3 x 2 factorial experiment consisting three treatments made of Arachis hypogea (groundnut, GFM), Lablab purpureus (lablab, LFM) forage meals and 50:50 mixture of both forage meals (GLFM), and two sex groups (males and females) in a completely randomized design. Both forages were harvested, chopped and milled before inclusion at 50% rate into the concentrate diet to make complete diets and offered at 125 g/rabbit/day in earthen feeders in the morning at 08.00 hr. Results obtained indicated that forage type did not affect final weight of rabbits. Feed intake and weight gain respectively were similar for GFM (75.26 ± 4.18, 6.02 ± 1.18 g/day), LFM (78.91 ± 3.50, 7.86 ± 0.99 g/day) and GLFM (74.35 ± 3.54, 7.53 ± 1.00 g/day). Feed cost and feed cost/kg gain were also similar for all the forage types. Male and female rabbits had similar final weight, feed intake, weight gain, feed cost and feed cost/kg gain. While weight gain was higher on GFM (7.95 ± 1.29 g/day) and LFM (7.37 ± 1.39 g/day) than GLFM (5.25 ± 1.29 g/day) for male rabbits, for female rabbits, weight gain was similar on GLFM (9.81 ± 1.53 g/day) and LFM (8.33 ± 1.39 g/day) and lower on GFM (4.09 ± 1.97 g/day). Saving/kg gain for male rabbits fed GFM and LFM was $ 0.64-0.81 than GLFM while it was $ 0.91-1.35 for female rabbits fed LFM and GLFM than GFM.
Mineral Content of Lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) Herbage as Influenced by Phosphorus Application, Cutting Height and Age of Cutting at Samaru, Nigeria  [PDF]
S.A. Ogedegbe,V.B. Ogunlela,O.O. Olufajo,E.C. Odion
Asian Journal of Crop Science , 2012,
Abstract: As a result of the critical importance of herbage quality and danger of poor mineral nutrition of forage legumes that affect livestock feeds in Nigeria, this investigation was conducted. The experiment entailed field trials at Samaru, Nigeria over three wet seasons to evaluate the response of mineral composition of lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet) herbage to phosphorus application and cutting treatments. The treatments were composed of factorial combinations of four rates of phosphorus application (0, 12, 24 and 36 kg P ha-1), two cutting heights (10 and 20 cm) as the main plot and four cutting ages (6, 12, 18 weeks and at maturity) as the sub-plot a in split plot design with three replications. Cutting lablab to a 10 cm stubble produced significantly higher calcium and phosphorus concentrations in the dry herbage than cutting to 20 cm. The Ca:P ratio in the herbage increased as age of cutting increased but cutting height did not influence this parameter. A phosphorus application rate of 12 kg P ha-1 produced the highest ash concentration in lablab herbage under a 12-week cutting regime. However, the highest phosphorus concentration of lablab herbage was produced with a zero phosphorus application rate under a cutting height of 10 cm. Under the first herbage cut, ash content increased significantly with age of cutting. It is beneficial to feed lablab herbage to livestock before crop attains physiological maturity. The nutritive value of the herbage determines the most appropriate time to feed lablab herbage to livestock.
Evaluation of the Mineral Nutrients and Organic Food Contents of the Seeds of Lablab purpureus, Leucaena leucocephala and Mucuna utilis for Domestic Consumption and Industrial Utilization  [PDF]
D.A. Alabi,A.A. Alausa
World Journal of Agricultural Sciences , 2006,
Abstract: Investigations were carried out on the mineral nutrients and organic food contents of seeds of three fodder Lablab purpureus, Leucaena leucocephala and Mucuna utilis for domestic consumption and industrial utilization. Leucaena leucocephala seeds contained the highest amount of lipids crude protein carbohydrates and ash contents. Lablab purpureus contained the lowest amount of lipid crude protein crude fibre and ash content. The seeds of Mucuna utilis has the highest fibre content. Seeds of L. leucocephala have highest mineral nutrient contents, which includes N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. However the seeds of L. purpureus contained P, Cu and Mg in higher quantities than the seeds of M. utilis of the three seeds, L. leucocephala seeds contained the highest saponification value, least iodine and acid contents. Seeds of L. leucocephala were found to be good for consumption and the oil can be used industrially for soap making.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.