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Geological Guide to Selected Areas of the Kruger National Park
J.W. Bristow,R. Sweeney,F.J. Venter
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1986, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v29i1.530
Abstract: The Kruger National Park (KNP) contains a considerable variety of rock types, ranging from Archaean granitoids to Recent sedimentary deposits. Some 3 500 million years of geological history is represented in an approximately 85 km east-west section at the southern area of the Kruger National Park. Older rocks are typically found in the western half of the KNP and to the east rock units become progressively younger. Some of the more important rock types found in the KNP include greenstones of the Barberton Mountain Land (approximately 3 500 million years old), granitoid rocks of the Nelspruit Batholith (approximately 3 200 million years old), syenitic intrusions associated with the Phalaborwa Complex (approximately 2 050 million years old), Soutpansberg volcanics and sediments (approximately 1 750 million years old), Timbavati Gabbros (approximately 1 450 million years old?), Karoo sediments and Lebombo volcanics (approximately 200 - 170 million years old) and Cretaceous to Recent sedimentary deposits which are best developed in the eastern region of the park.
The General Geology of the Kruger National Park  [cached]
I.C. Schutte
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1986, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v29i1.517
Abstract: Geological units and new data gathered during regional mapping of the Kruger National Park are summarised. A simplified geological map is presented in conjunction with this paper. A large number of new geological formations have been recognised in the course of this regional mapping and new names have been proposed for these units. Some of these names have not yet been officially recognised by the South African Committee for Stratigraphy (SACS). On-going work by the Geological Survey and other organisations is likely to lead to further additions to and refinement of the data presented in this paper. The Goudplaats and Makhutswi Gneisses are the oldest rocks known in the park. They form the sialic basement of the various greenstone belts represented by the Murchison and Barberton sequences. The age relations of the Orpen Gneiss* have not yet been established. Tonalitic and trondjemitic gneisses constitute the first phase of intrusion of the Nelspruit Granite Suite. The Shamiriri, Macetse* and Baderoukwe Granites, and the Cunning Moor Tonalite* intrudes rocks of Swazian age during the succeeding Randian Erathem. At the commencement of the Mokolian Erathem syenite of the Phalaborwa Complex intruded the Makhutswi Gneiss. Subsequently extrusion of lavas and deposition of sediments of the Soutpansberg Group of Mokolian age took place in a fault-bounded trough in the northern part of the park. Diabase intruded the Group in the form of sills. Pre-Karoo dykes of various ages occur throughout the area. The Timbavati Gabbro represents the youngest Pre-Karoo intrusion. The Late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic Karoo Sequence extends from north to south along the eastern edge of the park and consists of sedimentary rocks overlain by basalt and rhyolite. The last phase of Karoo volcanism is represented by granophyre, gabbro and microgranite. The sedimentary Malvernia Formation of Cretaceous age unconformably overlies the basalt in the northern part of the park. Quarternary surficial deposits blanket the older rocks in places. * Not yet approved by SACS.
Ants of the Kruger National Park
A. J. Prins
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1965, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v8i1.790
Abstract: Ants of the Kruger National Park
The vegetation and floristics of the Nkhuhlu Exclosures, Kruger National Park  [cached]
Frances Siebert,Holger C. Eckhardt
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2008, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v50i1.138
Abstract: The need to conduct research on the impact of elephant on the environment prompted the construction of exclosures along two of the most important rivers in the Kruger National Park. Scientific research on these exclosures along the Sabie and Letaba rivers addresses how patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the riparian zone are affected by fire, flood and herbivory. To further assist this research programme, a vegetation survey was conducted at the Nkhuhlu exclosure site along the Sabie River to classify and map the vegetation of the area. This will provide baseline data to assess future changes in vegetation and floristic patterns due to small-scale environmental factors created by the presence/absence of herbivory and fire. Phytosociological data were analysed to identify plant communities and subsequent mapping units. Five plant communities, ten sub-communities and four variants were recognised and described in relation to prevailing soil forms. Differences in species richness, diversity and community structure of the plant communities are clearly articulated.
The freshwater molluscs of the Kruger National Park  [cached]
G. Oberholzer,J. A. Van Eeden
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1967, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v10i1.762
Abstract: The freshwater molluscs of the Kruger National Park
Scarabaeidae from the Kruger National Park  [cached]
M. C. Ferreira
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1967, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v10i1.770
Abstract: Scarabaeidae from the Kruger National Park
The freshwater fished of the Kruger National Park  [cached]
Ph.D, U. de V. Pienaar
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1968, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v11i1.761
Abstract: The freshwater fished of the Kruger National Park
The vegetation and floristics of the Letaba exclosures, Kruger National Park, South Africa  [cached]
Frances Siebert,Holger C. Eckhardt,Stefan J. Siebert
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v52i1.777
Abstract: The construction of exclosures along two of the most important rivers in the Kruger National Park was done to investigate how patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the riparian zone is affected by fire, flood and herbivory. To assist this research programme, vegetation surveys were conducted within exclosures along the Letaba River to classify and map the vegetation of the area. The history and experimental design of the Letaba exclosures are similar to that of the Nkhuhlu exclosures along the Sabie River, which is directly related to questions surrounding elephant management. The main difference between the Nkhuhlu and Letaba exclosures is local heterogeneity, since the latter lies within the Mopaneveld, which is floristically and physiognomically much more homogenous than the vegetation of the southern Kruger National Park. Nevertheless, four plant communities, eight sub-communities and six variants were recognised and mapped for the Letaba exclosures. The vegetation description was done in relation to prevailing soil forms, differences in species richness, diversity and community structure, and therefore should serve as a basis for further detailed and broad-based botanical studies. Vegetation mapping was done to sub-community level and, where possible, to variant level. As expected in Mopaneveld vegetation, the plant communities could broadly be related to soil types, although smaller-scale variations correspond to soil moisture availability because the Mopaneveld is considered ‘event-driven’, especially in the herbaceous layer. Conservation implications: Floristic surveying and vegetation mapping of a long-term monitoring site, such as the Letaba exclosures, is seen as a baseline inventory to assist natural resource management. Linking mapping units to biodiversity strengthens the understanding needed to maintain biodiversity in all its natural facets and fluxes. How to cite this article: Siebert, F., Eckhardt, H.C. & Siebert, S.J., 2010, ‘The vegetation and floristics of the Letaba exclosures, Kruger National Park, South Africa’, Koedoe 52(1), Art. #777, 12 pages. DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v52i1.777
A report on Nematodes found in soil and root samples from the Kruger National Park
B.Sc, F. A. Van der Vegte,Ph.D., J. Heyns
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1963, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v6i1.820
Abstract: A report on Nematodes found in soil and root samples from the Kruger National Park
Landscapes of the Kruger National Park  [cached]
W. P. D Gertenbach
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1983, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v26i1.591
Abstract: Knowledge on the abiotic and biotic components of the Kruger National Park (KNP) system has increased to such an extent, that it was possible to zonate the KNP into landscapes. A landscape was defined as an area with a specific geomorphology, climate, soil and vegetation pattern together with the associated fauna. On this basis 35 landscapes were identified and described in terms of the components mentioned in the definition. The objective of classification is that future management should be based on these landscapes. Relevant management considerations may change, but the landscape a@ a basic functional unit should not be negotiable.
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