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The vegitation of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park  [cached]
B. R. Roberts
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1969, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v12i1.744
Abstract: The vegitation of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park
An Annotated Check List of the Birds of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park
R.A. Earle,A.B. Lawson
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1988, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v31i1.495
Abstract: This paper presents a check list of 159 bird species occuring in the Golden Gate Higlands National Park and lists another 14 species needing confirmation Temporal distribution of the species on a monthly basis was obtained during one year, between April 1983 and March 1984. Brief discussion on present status and breeding is given where possible.
A provisional check list of the reptiles and amphibians of Golden Gate Highlands National Park  [cached]
M.F. Bates
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1991, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v34i2.431
Abstract: A provisional check list of 26 reptile and amphibian species (8 frog, 8 lizard and 10 snake species) occurring in Golden Gate Highlands National Park is presented. The list does not reflect the results of an intensive survey, but is a record of specimens collected in the park and preserved at the National Museum, Bloemfontein.
Additions to the bird list of the Addo Elephant National Park  [cached]
B. Every,W.C. Marais,G.P. Bligh
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1985, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v28i1.541
Abstract: Liversidge (1965,Koedoe 8:41-67) lists 120 species of birds as occuring in the Addo Elephant National Park.
An annotated check list of the birds of Qwaqwa National Park  [cached]
D.H. De Swardt,D.J. van Niekerk
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1996, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v39i1.285
Abstract: This paper presents a check list of 179 bird species occuring in the Qwaqwa National Park which borders the eastern part of Golden Gate Highlands National Park. Data on the distribution, status, habitat preferences and breeding were obtained during several visits between December 1992 and March 1995. The following habitats were preferred: grassland, montane grassland, woodland, rocky hillsides, mountain slopes and riverine areas with Phragmites reedbeds. The conservation of waterbirds, raptors and other localised species such as Orangebreasted Rockjumper, Palecrowned Cisticola, Mountain Pipit and Gurney's Sugarbird is important as these species occur in specialised habitats.
Freshwater fishes of Golden Gate Highlands National Park
I.A. Russell,P.H. Skelton
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2005, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v48i1.168
Abstract: The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park. A total of 1778 fish specimens from three species were collected during surveys carried out in the Little Caledon River during 2002. The chubbyhead barb Barbus anoplus was the only indigenous species recorded, and comprised 99.5 of the total catch. Two of the three recorded species were alien {Cypnnus carpio, Oncorhynchus mykiss}. A further nine indigenous species could potentially occur within the park, though are unlikely to be permanent residents. Barriers formed by instream impoundments may prevent temporary immigration of indigenous fishes, but also limit the further spread of alien species in the park's rivers.
Food preferences of oribi Ourebia ourebi in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park  [cached]
B.K Reilly,G.K Theron,J du P Bothma
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1990, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v33i1.452
Abstract: During a two-year study on the ecology of oribi Ourebia ourebi (Zimmermann, 1783) in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, plant species fed on by oribi were noted. The oribi fed on a total of 22 plant species. Feeding preference categories were assigned according to the degree of use of different plant species, based on direct observation and on a preference rating. The oribi in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park showed a seasonal variation in feeding preferences, utilising several species of forbs primarily during the summer and a marked dif-ference between per cent frequency utilisation of plant species and actual preference rating according to availability of species and for certain plant parts, e.g. for Sporobolus centrifugus.
Geology of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park  [cached]
G.H. Groenewald
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1986, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v29i1.529
Abstract: The Golden Gate Highlands National Park is underlain by stratigraphic units belonging to the upper part of the Karoo Sequence. These units include part of the Beaufort Group and the Molteno, Elliot, Clarens and Drakensberg Formations. Dolerite dykes and sills are intruded into the succession while recent alluvium and scree cover the valley floors and mountain slopes. The Beaufort Group is represented by red mudstone and light brown fine-grained feldspathic sandstone of the Tarkastad Subgroup. The Molteno Formation consists of medium- to coarse-grained trough cross-bedded sandstone, while the Elliot Formation comprises a thick succession of red mudstone, siltstone and interlayered fine- to medium-grained, light yellow-brown sandstone. The most characteristic feature of the park is the yellowish sandstone cliffs of the Clarens Formation. Cave formation is caused by exudation, differential weathering due to different degrees of carbonate cementation and undercutting of the sandstone. The highest peaks are capped by numerous layers of amygdaloidal and massive varieties of basaltic lava of the Drakensberg Formation. A possible volcanic pipe occurs in the eastern part of the park. The Elliot and Clarens Formations are rich in vertebrate fossil remains, especially Massospondylus sp. Remains of Notochampsa sp., Pachygenelus monus, Clarencea gracilis, Lanasaurus scalpridens and a cluster of unidentified dinosaur eggs have also been found. The formations underlying the Golden Gate Highlands National Park were formed during the Late Triassic Epoch and the Jurassic Period (roughly 150 to 230 million years ago). The strata in the park show very little structural deformation and the only obvious structures are faults which are intruded by dolerite.
Sandstone geomorphology of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa, in a global context  [cached]
Stefan W. Grab,Andrew S. Goudie,Heather A. Viles,Nicola Webb
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2011, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v53i1.985
Abstract: The Golden Gate Highlands National Park (GGHNP) is well known for its impressive sandstone formations. While previous geoscience research in the park has focused on geology, palaeontology, slope forms and the prominent lichen weathering, remarkably little has been written on the diversity and possible origins of sandstone phenomena in the region. The objectives of this study were (1) to present a geomorphological map of prominent and interesting landforms for particular portions of the park and (2) to document the variety of macro- and microscale sandstone formations observed. During field work, we undertook global positioning system measurements to map landforms and, in addition, measured the dimensions of several landform types. A Schmidt hammer was used to conduct rock hardness tests at a variety of localities and lithologies for comparative purposes. We indentified and mapped 27 macro- and microscale sandstone landforms, of which 17 are described in detail. It is demonstrated that for the most part, the landforms are a likely product of surface lithological reactions to a regional climate characterised by pronounced multitemporal temperature and moisture shifts, recently and in the past. However, many of the geomorphological processes producing landforms are controlled by microclimates set up by factors such as macro- and microtopography. Conservation implications: The GGHNP is best known for its geological, geomorphological and palaeontological heritage. This paper highlights the diversity of sandstone geomorphological phenomena, many of them rare and ‘unique’ to the region. Not only are these landforms of aesthetic interest to tourists, but they also provide microhabitats for biota. Thus, conservation of biota requires associated conservation of geo-environments where they are established. How to cite this article: Grab, S.W., Goudie, A.S., Viles, H.A. & Webb, N., 2011, ‘Sandstone geomorphology of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa, in a global context’, Koedoe 53(1), Art. #985, 14 pages. DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v53i1.985
Arboreal Coleoptera Associated with Leucosidea sericea (Rosaceae) at the Golden Gate Highlands National Park  [cached]
Schalk Louw
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1988, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v31i1.484
Abstract: An analysis was made of arboreal Coleoptera on Leucosidea sericea from the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the north-eastern Orange Free State, Republic of South Africa. Five sites were selected from which samples were taken, using a beating technique, at equal intensity, during 13 consecutive months. A total of 117 species representing 35 families were recorded and allocated to four guilds, namely phytophages (47 species), predators (44 species), scavengers (16 species) and tourists (10 species). This diversity is attributed to the structural complexity and range of the host plant. The scarcity of a large number of these species is primarily ascribed to a high seasonal turnover rate. Species diversity and numbers of individuals were found to vary between the different study sites and are attributed to the growth stage and condition of the host plant, as well as the effect of sun and shade on activity cycles and the choice of feeding levels.
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