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Clinical appraisal of tafluprost in the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension  [cached]
Makoto Aihara
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: Makoto AiharaDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: An elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is one of the most important risk factors for the development of glaucoma, which causes progressive optic neuropathy. Lowering IOP is currently the only therapeutic approach to the treatment of glaucoma. Tafluprost, a novel prostaglandin analogue, was recently launched onto the market as an ocular hypotensive agent. Tafluprost is potent in its affinity for the prostanoid FP receptor and in its intraocular lowering efficacy. Moreover, it enhances the ocular hemodynamics and has neuroprotective effects. Clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy at decreasing intraocular pressure in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.Keywords: open-angle glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma, receptor affinity, intraocular pressure
Safety and tolerability of tafluprost in treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension  [cached]
Dorota Pozarowska
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: Dorota PozarowskaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Medical University, Lublin, PolandAbstract: Glaucoma is one of the most common neuropathies of the optic nerve. An elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a well documented risk factor for the development and progression of this disease. Until now, IOP reduction is the only well documented successful method of glaucoma treatment. Among the many hypotensive drugs, prostaglandin analogs are proved to be the most potent antiglaucoma agents, with very few systemic side effects. A new prostanoid FP receptor analog, tafluprost, has been introduced into the medical treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Many studies have shown that it is an efficient IOP-lowering drug, and that it is safe and well tolerated. A preservative-free tafluprost formulation is as potent as a preserved one, but it has fewer and milder toxic effects on the eye.Keywords: tafluprost, prostaglandins, pharmacokinetics, safety, toxic effects, preservatives
Clinical appraisal of tafluprost in the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension
Makoto Aihara
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S6368
Abstract: ical appraisal of tafluprost in the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension Review (5410) Total Article Views Authors: Makoto Aihara Published Date March 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 163 - 170 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S6368 Makoto Aihara Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: An elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is one of the most important risk factors for the development of glaucoma, which causes progressive optic neuropathy. Lowering IOP is currently the only therapeutic approach to the treatment of glaucoma. Tafluprost, a novel prostaglandin analogue, was recently launched onto the market as an ocular hypotensive agent. Tafluprost is potent in its affinity for the prostanoid FP receptor and in its intraocular lowering efficacy. Moreover, it enhances the ocular hemodynamics and has neuroprotective effects. Clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy at decreasing intraocular pressure in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
Safety and tolerability of tafluprost in treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension
Dorota Pozarowska
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S6369
Abstract: fety and tolerability of tafluprost in treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension Review (4453) Total Article Views Authors: Dorota Pozarowska Published Date October 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1229 - 1236 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S6369 Dorota Pozarowska Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University, Lublin, Poland Abstract: Glaucoma is one of the most common neuropathies of the optic nerve. An elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a well documented risk factor for the development and progression of this disease. Until now, IOP reduction is the only well documented successful method of glaucoma treatment. Among the many hypotensive drugs, prostaglandin analogs are proved to be the most potent antiglaucoma agents, with very few systemic side effects. A new prostanoid FP receptor analog, tafluprost, has been introduced into the medical treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Many studies have shown that it is an efficient IOP-lowering drug, and that it is safe and well tolerated. A preservative-free tafluprost formulation is as potent as a preserved one, but it has fewer and milder toxic effects on the eye.
Diurnal IOP-lowering efficacy and safety of travoprost 0.004% compared with tafluprost 0.0015% in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension
Dietmar Schnober, Günter Hofmann, Hubert Maier, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S13720
Abstract: rnal IOP-lowering efficacy and safety of travoprost 0.004% compared with tafluprost 0.0015% in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension Original Research (4674) Total Article Views Authors: Dietmar Schnober, Günter Hofmann, Hubert Maier, et al Published Date December 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1459 - 1463 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S13720 Dietmar Schnober1, Günter Hofmann2, Hubert Maier3, Maria-Luise Scherzer4, Abayomi B Ogundele5, Mark C Jasek5 1Private practices, Werdohl, 2Schweinfurt, 3Gerolzhofen, 4Regenstauf, Germany; 5Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, TX, USA Purpose: To compare the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy and safety of travoprost 0.004% and tafluprost 0.0015% administered to patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Methods: This was a randomized, double-masked, active-controlled, crossover design trial, in which patients were randomized to either travoprost or tafluprost monotherapy administered once daily in the evening for six weeks and then crossed over to the alternative treatment for another six weeks. Diurnal IOP was measured (8 am to 8 pm, every two hours) and a solicited symptom survey was administered at the end of both six-week periods, as was conjunctival hyperemia and visual acuity assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and adverse event solicitation. Results: Fifty-one patients were randomized and 48 patients completed the study. The 12-hour mean diurnal IOP was significantly lower with travoprost therapy than with tafluprost therapy (P = 0.01), and a significantly lower IOP was also reported for travoprost at five of the seven individual time points (P < 0.05). Neither therapy produced a significant increase from baseline in any of the individual patient-reported symptom scores, except for hyperemia (P ≤ 0.01), which was increased with both treatments. Investigator-observed hyperemia was also increased from baseline with both therapies (P < 0.01), although the increase with travoprost therapy was significantly smaller than with tafluprost (P < 0.01). No additional safety concerns were noted from slit-lamp biomicroscopy or visual acuity results, and no difference was noted in patient-reported tolerability of the two medications. Conclusion: Travoprost 0.004% monotherapy produced lower diurnal IOP than tafluprost 0.0015% in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension and exhibited a similar safety profile.
Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of preservative-free tafluprost in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma
Ermi SS
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S24248
Abstract: ential pharmacology and clinical utility of preservative-free tafluprost in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma Review (2055) Total Article Views Authors: Ermi SS Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 673 - 678 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S24248 Received: 15 March 2012 Accepted: 03 April 2012 Published: 07 May 2012 Sitki Samet Ermi Faculty of Medicine, Balikesir University, Tip Fakültesi, agis Kampüsü, Balikesir, Turkey Abstract: Glaucoma is a chronic disease requiring lifelong treatment. Discomfort due to medications may affect patients' quality of life and may cause poor compliance, which leads to poor intraocular pressure control. To minimize the side effects of long-term treatment, preparations with lower benzalkonium chloride concentrations, preservative-free preparations and alternative preservatives have been developed and reported to have a lower rate of side effects. Tafluprost, launched on the ophthalmic market in 2008, is a new 16-phenoxy analogue of prostaglandin F2α, clinically used as an ocular hypotensive agent for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The safety and intraocular pressure-lowering efficacy of tafluprost has been demonstrated in various preclinical and clinical studies.
Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of preservative-free tafluprost in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma  [cached]
Ermi? SS
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Sitki Samet Ermi Faculty of Medicine, Balikesir University, Tip Fakültesi, agis Kampüsü, Balikesir, TurkeyAbstract: Glaucoma is a chronic disease requiring lifelong treatment. Discomfort due to medications may affect patients' quality of life and may cause poor compliance, which leads to poor intraocular pressure control. To minimize the side effects of long-term treatment, preparations with lower benzalkonium chloride concentrations, preservative-free preparations and alternative preservatives have been developed and reported to have a lower rate of side effects. Tafluprost, launched on the ophthalmic market in 2008, is a new 16-phenoxy analogue of prostaglandin F2α, clinically used as an ocular hypotensive agent for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The safety and intraocular pressure-lowering efficacy of tafluprost has been demonstrated in various preclinical and clinical studies.Keywords: tafluprost, AFP 168, glaucoma, intraocular pressure, preservative
Tafluprost once daily for treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in patients with open-angle glaucoma  [cached]
Liu Y,Mao W
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Yang Liu, Weiming MaoDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, North Texas Eye Research Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TXAbstract: Glaucoma is a leading cause of visual loss worldwide. Current antiglaucoma therapy focuses on lowering intraocular pressure to a safe level. In recent years, prostaglandin analogs have become the first-line agents for treating open angle glaucoma. Tafluprost, which was first reported in 2003, is a novel prostaglandin analog, and has been shown to be a potent ocular hypotensive agent in a number of preclinical and clinical studies. Also, its unique preservative-free formulation helps to decrease preservative-associated ocular disorders and improve patient compliance. In this review, studies from 2003 to 2012 focusing on the structure, metabolism, efficacy, and safety of tafluprost are summarized. These studies suggested that application of tafluprost once daily is a safe and effective treatment for patients with open angle glaucoma.Keywords: tafluprost, prostaglandin analog, glaucoma, intraocular pressure, preservative-free formulation
Tafluprost once daily for treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in patients with open-angle glaucoma
Liu Y, Mao W
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S30951
Abstract: fluprost once daily for treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in patients with open-angle glaucoma Review (1747) Total Article Views Authors: Liu Y, Mao W Published Date December 2012 Volume 2013:7 Pages 7 - 14 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S30951 Received: 11 October 2012 Accepted: 20 November 2012 Published: 21 December 2012 Yang Liu, Weiming Mao Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, North Texas Eye Research Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX Abstract: Glaucoma is a leading cause of visual loss worldwide. Current antiglaucoma therapy focuses on lowering intraocular pressure to a safe level. In recent years, prostaglandin analogs have become the first-line agents for treating open angle glaucoma. Tafluprost, which was first reported in 2003, is a novel prostaglandin analog, and has been shown to be a potent ocular hypotensive agent in a number of preclinical and clinical studies. Also, its unique preservative-free formulation helps to decrease preservative-associated ocular disorders and improve patient compliance. In this review, studies from 2003 to 2012 focusing on the structure, metabolism, efficacy, and safety of tafluprost are summarized. These studies suggested that application of tafluprost once daily is a safe and effective treatment for patients with open angle glaucoma.
Effects of preservative-free tafluprost on tear film osmolarity, tolerability, and intraocular pressure in previously treated patients with open-angle glaucoma  [cached]
Janulevi?ien? I,Derka? I,Grybauskiene L,Paulauskait? R
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Ingrida Januleviciene, Irmante Derkac, Lina Grybauskiene, Ruta Paulauskaite, Ruta Gromnickaite, Loreta KuzmieneEye Clinic of Kaunas Medical Academy of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, LithuaniaPurpose: To compare the effects on tolerability, tear osmolarity, and intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect of switching from benzalkonium chloride (BAK) containing prostaglandin analog (PGA) latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost.Patients and methods: Thirty patients with open-angle glaucoma (N = 60 eyes), 26 women (87%) and four men (13%) aged 64.1 (SD 14.1) years, showing abnormal values of tear osmolarity, corneal fluorescein staining, tear film break-up time (TBUT), or subjective discomfort with current latanoprost treatment were included. After tear osmolarity (TearLab Osmolarity System), TBUT, corneal fluorescein staining, and baseline IOP (Goldmann tonometer) measurements and the completion of Ocular Surface Disease Index and Ocular Surface Symptoms in Glaucoma Scale questionnaires, patients were assigned to preservative-free tafluprost treatment. Measurements were repeated 2, 6 and 12 weeks after change of medication.Results: No statistically significant differences in IOP were observed 2, 6, and 12 weeks after switching to preservative-free tafluprost. Mean IOP at baseline was 16.4 mmHg (SD 2.9), after 2 weeks 16.2 mmHg (2.8), after 6 weeks 16.2 (2.6), and after 12 weeks 16.3 mmHg (2.3). Mean tear osmolarity decreased significantly from 315.7 mOsm/L (SD 15.1) at baseline to 308.0 ± 14.4 mOsm/L (P = 0.002), 301.7 ± 14.5 mOsm/L (P < 0.001), and 302.0 ± 9.9 mOsm/L (P < 0.001) 2, 6, and 12 weeks after changing medication to preservative-free tafluprost, respectively. Tear osmolarity was lower in 37 eyes (61.7%) after 2 weeks, in 46 eyes (76.7%) after 6 weeks, and in 49 eyes (81.7%) after 12 weeks (P < 0.005; t-test). At baseline corneal fluorescein staining was observed in 43 eyes (71.7%), after 2 weeks in 34 eyes (56.7%), after 6 weeks in 12 eyes (20.0%), and after 12 weeks in 7 eyes (11.7%) (P < 0.005; McNemar test). Mean TBUT increased from 3.7 seconds (SD 1.1) at baseline to 4.1 seconds (SD 1.0) at week 2, 5.2 seconds (SD 1.5) at week 6, and 6.5 seconds (SD 1.5) at week 12 (P < 0.001; t-test). The number of patients expressing discomfort with latanoprost diminished from 30 (100%) at baseline, to 19 (63.3%) after week 2, and to 11 (36.6%) (P < 0.05; McNemar test) after 12 weeks.Conclusion: Preservative-free tafluprost is better tolerated than BAK-containing latanoprost, showing lower tear osmolarity levels while maintaining eff
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