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Aspergilloma in sarcoidosis  [cached]
Hede Jagruti,Bahot Rahul,Shah J
Lung India , 2009,
Abstract: This is a case report of a 48-year-old man, followed up for nearly 30 years who initially developed sarcoidosis at the age of 18 that went into remission after 8 years of treatment. Ten years later, he developed sputum-positive tuberculosis and was cured with anti-tubercular treatment. Following this, there was progression of sarcoidosis to stage IV fibrocystic disease. Ten years later, he had massive hemoptysis during which time, aspergilloma was detected in a sarcoid cystic cavity.
Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with coexistant aspergilloma: a case report
Izidor Kern, Anton Lopert
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-4-309
Abstract: We present the case of a 56-year-old Caucasian man who worked as a farmer, with infiltrates in the right lower and middle lung lobes, partial consolidation of the middle lobe and with previous diagnosis of chronic obstructive bronchitis. Evaluation of our patient led to the diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with coexistent aspergilloma in the right lower lobe. He was treated with oral methylprednisolone and itraconazole. At the five-year follow-up he is without any sign of recurrence.Aspergillus infection after the inhalation of spores in the form of a hypersensitivity reaction and saprophytic colonization can be coexistent.Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a complex hypersensitivity reaction in patients with asthma, which occurs when bronchi are colonized by the fungus Aspergillus, most often Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease is characterized by type I and type III hypersensitivity reactions. The incidence may be as high as 6% of patients with asthma [1]. Repeated episodes of bronchial obstruction, inflammation and mucoid impaction can lead to bronchiectasis, fibrosis and respiratory compromise.Aspergilloma is a saprophytic growth of fungus, usually A. fumigatus, in the lumen of an existing cavity, which does not invade the tissue. Fungus ball formation has been observed in an old tuberculosis cavity, bronchiectasis, abscess or in a congenital cyst.We present a case of the coexistence of ABPA and aspergilloma. A patient with ABPA developed a cavitary pulmonary lesion with characteristic radiological appearances of aspergilloma. The management and time sequence of the ABPA and aspergilloma occurrences are discussed.A 56-year-old Caucasian Slovenian man, who worked as a farmer and was a non-smoker, was treated for bronchopneumonia in the right upper lobe in 1970 and 1974. The infiltrate resolved after antibiotic therapy with penicillin. He also had symptoms of chronic bronchitis, but he did not require therapy.In 1996, our patient
Aspergilloma formation in cavitary sarcoidosis
Panjabi, Chandramani;Sahay, Sandeep;Shah, Ashok;
Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S1806-37132009000500015
Abstract: pulmonary cavitation is rather uncommon in patients with sarcoidosis, and aspergilloma is even more uncommon in such cases. here, we present the case of a 63-year-old female patient with cavitary lung disease who had been under treatment for tb for 9 months. a diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis was established based on the fiberoptic bronchoscopy finding of noncaseating granuloma. treatment with corticosteroids led to a dramatic improvement in symptoms. while under treatment for sarcoidosis, the patient developed an aspergilloma. she presented immediate skin test reactivity to aspergillus fumigatus, as well as positivity for a. fumigatus serum precipitins. this is the first reported case of aspergilloma formation in a patient with cavitary sarcoidosis in india.
Cerebral Aspergilloma in an immunocompetent patient  [PDF]
Ravi S,Bushan J V,Reddy K,Chandrashekar K
Calicut Medical Journal , 2007,
Abstract: Intracranial fungal infections are being identified more frequently due to the increased incidenceof acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, better radiological investigations, moresensitive microbiological techniques, and better critical care of moribund patients. Generalawareness of the possibility of fungal infection has also increased. It may present in severalforms: meningitis, mycotic aneurysms, infarcts and the tumoral form (aspergilloma). We report arare case of a immunocompetent patient with cerebral aspergilloma.
Prolapsed Intraocular Aspergilloma Masquerading as Malignant Melanoma  [cached]
Bajaj Mandeep,Pushker Neelam,Kulkarni Amol,Kashyap Seema
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 2003,
Abstract: We describe an aspergilloma that masqueraded as an intraocular malignant melanoma in an elderly male patient.
HUMAN PARAGONIMIASIS IN AFRICA
NA Aka, K Adoubryn, D Rondelaud, G Dreyfuss
Annals of African Medicine , 2008,
Abstract: An up-to-date review on human paragonimiasis in Africa was carried out to determine the current geographical distribution of human cases and analyze the animal reservoir, snails and crustaceans which intervene in the local life cycle of Paragonimus species. Two countries, i.e., Cameroon and Nigeria, were mainly affected by this disease, while the distribution of human cases in the other eight states of the intertropical zone was scattered. Infected patients were currently few in number and two Paragonimus species: P. africanus and P. uterobilateralis, were found. The animal reservoir is mainly constituted by crab-eating mammals. The identity of the host snail remains doubtful and was either a prosobranch, or a land snail. Seven crab species belonging to Callinectes, Liberonautes and Sudanonautes genera are able to harbour paragonimid metacercariae. Due to the current low prevalence of human paragonimiasis recorded in Africa and the high cost of wide-scale screenings for this disease, training of technicians in anti-tuberculosis centers would be the most realistic attitude to detect mycobacteria and/or Paragonimus eggs during the same sputum examination
Human paragonimiasis in Africa  [cached]
Aka N′Da,Adoubryn Koffi,Rondelaud Daniel,Dreyfuss Gilles
Annals of African Medicine , 2008,
Abstract: An up-to-date review on human paragonimiasis in Africa was carried out to determine the current geographical distribution of human cases and analyze the animal reservoir, snails and crustaceans which intervene in the local life cycle of Paragonimus species. Two countries, i.e., Cameroon and Nigeria, were mainly affected by this disease, while the distribution of human cases in the other eight states of the intertropical zone was scattered. Infected patients were currently few in number and two Paragonimus species: P. africanus and P. uterobilateralis, were found. The animal reservoir is mainly constituted by crab-eating mammals. The identity of the host snail remains doubtful and was either a prosobranch, or a land snail. Seven crab species belonging to Callinectes, Liberonautes and Sudanonautes genera are able to harbour paragonimid metacercariae. Due to the current low prevalence of human paragonimiasis recorded in Africa and the high cost of wide-scale screenings for this disease, training of technicians in anti-tuberculosis centers would be the most realistic attitude to detect mycobacteria and/or Paragonimus eggs during the same sputum examination.
Aspergilloma in a Pulmonary Hydatid  [PDF]
Nikhil Tiwari, Ramesh Kaushik, Gaurav Kumar, Gautam Ganguly, Shabaz Hasnain
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery (WJCS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/wjcs.2013.33020
Abstract: Aspergilloma infection in the lung can occur in preexisting cavities and is usually seen after tuberculosis, pulmonary infarction and bronchestasis. Occassionally aspergilloma has been reported within a hydatid cyst. We describe a patient with aspergilloma formed within cyst hydatid. The primary symptom in this patient was recurrent hemoptysis. In this 42-year-old male, the diagnosis was established by HRCT chest. Treatment consisted of postero-lateral thoracotomy with a bilobectomy of lower and middle lobe. Aspergilloma is an unusual complication of hydatid cyst and results from the deterioration of local defence against opportunistic infections.
Uncommon presentation of pulmonary aspergilloma
Baradkar V,Mathur M,Kumar S
Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology , 2009,
Abstract: Cases of pulmonary aspergilloma without any predisposing factors are rarely reported. Clinical presentation varies from case to case. Here, we report a case of pulmonary aspergilloma in a 60-year-old male patient who was admitted to the Intensive Respiratory Care Unit with spontaneous pneumothorax. The patient had a history of dyspnea on exertion since 9 months and mild haemoptysis since the last 6 months. A computerised tomographic scan of the lungs showed a lesion in the left main bronchus along with obstructive emphysema of the right lung, moderate pneumothorax and mediastinal emphysema. Bronchoscopy was performed and the biopsy samples were processed for histopathological examination and culture on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar, which yielded growth of Aspergillus flavus. Repeat sputum samples also yielded the growth of A. flavus . The patient responded to intravenous liposomaamphotericin B and intercostal drainage.
Aspergilloma in combination with adenocarcinoma of the lung
Mohamed Smahi, Mounia Serraj, Yassine Ouadnouni, Laila Chbani, Kaoutar Znati, Afaf Amarti
World Journal of Surgical Oncology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7819-9-27
Abstract: In Morocco, pulmonary aspergilloma is most commonly diagnosed in a patient with a healed tuberculous cavity. It rarely affects healthy people with an intact immune response, but those with preexisting structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Aspergillosis can remain asymptomatic or present with hemoptysis, which can be life-threatening [1]. In this report, we describe a fortuitous discovery of unsuspected lung adenocarcinoma in surgical resection performed for aspergilloma of the right upper lobe.A 60 -year-old man, with social history included a 25 packs/year smoking habit, who was otherwise healthy, presented with history of cough productive with some episodes of small hemoptysis for 7 weeks. There was no history of chest pain, shortness of breath, fever or chills, and he denied any history of weight loss. On physical examination, he appeared healthy with normal findings. Chest radiography revealed a cavitary lesion with "air crescent sign" characteristic of an intracavitary mycetoma (Figure 1), and on CT, there was a cavitary lesion on horseback on the segments of the right upper lung lobe, with a central heterogeneous rounded density, changing position with the patient's movements evoking an aspergilloma (Figure 2). No lesion was detected on fiberoptic bronchoscopy and biopsies were negative. His antifungal serum antibodies were non reactive. CT guided needle aspiration biopsy of the lesion was performed and showed a large number of fungal hyphae of Aspergillus.Preoperative pulmonary function tests gave normal results. On thoracotomy, a soft mass was palpable in the right upper lobe. Right upper lobectomy was performed. This revealed the presence of an unsuspected 30 mm differentiated and infiltrated lung adenocarcinoma surrounding the 45 mm cavity containing the aspergilloma (Figure 3). Peribronchial and interbronchial nodes were disease free. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery. The final h
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