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An Inflationary Scenario Taking into Account of Possible Dark Energy Effects in the Early Universe  [PDF]
Zhe Chang,Ming-Hua Li,Sai Wang,Xin Li
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1140/epjc/s10052-012-1915-3
Abstract: We investigate the possible effect of cosmological-constant type dark energy during the inflation period of the early universe. This is accommodated by a new dispersion relation in de Sitter space. The modified inflation model of a minimally-coupled scalar field is still able to yield an observation-compatible scale-invariant primordial spectrum, simultaneously having potential to generate a spectrum with lower power at large scales. A qualitative match to the WMAP 7-year data is presented. We obtain an $\Omega_\Lambda$ of the same order of that in the $\Lambda$-CDM model. Possible relations between the de Sitter scenario and the Doubly Special Relativity(DSR) are also discussed.
Baryogenesis from dark matter in an inflationary universe
Feng, Wan-Zhe;Mazumdar, Anupam;Nath, Pran
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2013,
Abstract: We consider the possibility that in an inflationary universe, the inflaton field decays purely into the dark sector creating asymmetric dark matter at the end of inflation. This asymmetry is subsequently transmuted into leptons and baryons. We consider this possibility in the framework of a generic inflation model, and compute the amount of asymmetric dark matter created from the out of equilibrium decays of the inflaton with CP violating Yukawa couplings. The dark matter asymmetry is then transferred to the visible sector by the asymmetry transfer equation and generates an excess of $B-L$. Baryogenesis occurs via sphaleron processes which conserve $B-L$ but violate $B+L$. A mechanism for the annihilation of the symmetric component of dark matter is also discussed. The model leads to multi-component dark matter consisting of both bosonic and fermionic components.
Dark Matter and Energy in the Universe  [PDF]
Michael S. Turner
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1238/Physica.Topical.085a00210
Abstract: For the first time, we have a plausible and complete accounting of matter and energy in the Universe. Expressed a fraction of the critical density it goes like this: neutrinos, between 0.3% and 15%; stars, between 0.3% and 0.6%; baryons (total), 5% +/- 0.5%; matter (total), 40% +/- 10%; smooth, dark energy, 80% +/- 20%; totaling to the critical density (within the errors). This accounting is consistent with the inflationary prediction of a flat Universe and defines three dark-matter problems: Where are the dark baryons? What is the nonbaryonic dark matter? What is the nature of the dark energy? The leading candidate for the (optically) dark baryons is diffuse hot gas; the leading candidates for the nonbaryonic dark matter are slowly moving elementary particles left over from the earliest moments (cold dark matter), such as axions or neutralinos; the leading candidates for the dark energy involve fundamental physics and include a cosmological constant (vacuum energy), a rolling scalar field (quintessence), and a network of light, frustrated topological defects.
Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe  [PDF]
Michael S. Turner
Physics , 1998,
Abstract: For the first time, we have a plausible, complete accounting of matter and energy in the Universe. Expressed a fraction of the critical density it goes like this: neutrinos, between 0.3% and 15%; stars, 0.5%; baryons (total), 5%; matter (total), 40%; smooth, dark energy, 60%; adding up to the critical density. This accounting is consistent with the inflationary prediction of a flat Universe and defines three dark-matter problems: Where are the dark baryons? What is the nonbaryonic dark matter? What is the nature of the dark energy? The leading candidate for the (optically) dark baryons is diffuse hot gas; the leading candidates for the nonbaryonic dark matter are slowly moving elementary particles left over from the earliest moments (cold dark matter), such as axions or neutralinos; the leading candidates for the dark energy involve fundamental physics and include a cosmological constant (vacuum energy), a rolling scalar field (quintessence), and light, frustrated topological defects.
Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe  [PDF]
BC Paul
BIBECHANA , 2014, DOI: 10.3126/bibechana.v11i0.10374
Abstract: Cosmological and astronomical observations predict that the present Universe is passing through an accelerating phase of expansion. The Universe emerged out of an exponential phase in the very early Universe. The scalar field of the standard model of particle physics when used in cosmology admits such a phase of expansion known as inflation. The most favourable condition for inflation with scalar field to admit an Inflationary scenario is that the potential energy must dominate over the kinetic energy which one obtains with a flat potential. Thereafter the Universe enters into a matter dominated phase when the field oscillates at the minimum of the potential. But it is not possible to accommodate the present accelerating phase in the Einstein’s gravity. It is known from observational analysis that about 73 % matter is responsible for the late phase expansion and 23 % matter called Dark Matter is responsible for a stable galaxy. We discuss here the relevant fields and theories that are useful for describing the late Universe.
Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe  [PDF]
Joshua Frieman,Michael Turner,Dragan Huterer
Physics , 2008, DOI: 10.1146/annurev.astro.46.060407.145243
Abstract: The discovery ten years ago that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating put in place the last major building block of the present cosmological model, in which the Universe is composed of 4% baryons, 20% dark matter, and 76% dark energy. At the same time, it posed one of the most profound mysteries in all of science, with deep connections to both astrophysics and particle physics. Cosmic acceleration could arise from the repulsive gravity of dark energy -- for example, the quantum energy of the vacuum -- or it may signal that General Relativity breaks down on cosmological scales and must be replaced. We review the present observational evidence for cosmic acceleration and what it has revealed about dark energy, discuss the various theoretical ideas that have been proposed to explain acceleration, and describe the key observational probes that will shed light on this enigma in the coming years.
From the Dark Matter Universe to the Dark Energy Universe  [PDF]
Burra G. Sidharth
Physics , 2008,
Abstract: Till the late nineties the accepted cosmological model was that of a Universe that had originated in the Big Bang and was now decelerating under the influence of as yet undetected dark matter, so that it would come to a halt and eventually collapse. In 1997 however, the author had put forward a contra model wherein the Universe was driven by dark energy, essentially the quantum zero point field, and was accelerating with a small cosmological constant. There were other deductions too, all in total agreement with observation. All this got confirmation in 1998 and subsequent observations have reconfirmed the findings.
The dark energy-dominated Universe  [PDF]
J. C. N. de Araujo
Physics , 2005, DOI: 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2004.12.004
Abstract: In this paper we investigate the epochs in which the Universe started accelerating and when it began to become dark energy-dominated (i.e., the dynamics of the expansion of the Universe dominated by the dark energy). We provide analytic expressions to calculate the redshifts of these epochs as a function of density parameters. Moreover, we review and discuss cosmological models with a dark energy component, which can have an interesting characteristic, namely, they never stop accelerating. This holds even if the Universe is at present time either flat, open, or closed. If the dark energy is the cosmological constant the Universe will eventually end up undergoing an exponentially expansion phase, and the total density parameter converging to $\Omega=1$. This is exactly what is considered in inflationary scenario to generate the initial conditions for the big bang. One can then argue that the Universe begun with an inflationary phase and will end up with another inflationary phase. Thus, it follows that in both the early and the late Universe $\Omega \to 1$. We also discuss the above issues in the context of the XCDM parametrization.
Inflationary Cosmology Connecting Dark Energy and Dark Matter
Chung, Daniel J. H.;Everett, Lisa L.;Matchev, Konstantin T.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2007, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.76.103530
Abstract: Kination dominated quintessence models of dark energy have the intriguing feature that the relic abundance of thermal cold dark matter can be significantly enhanced compared to the predictions from standard cosmology. Previous treatments of such models do not include a realistic embedding of inflationary initial conditions. We remedy this situation by constructing a viable inflationary model in which the inflaton and quintessence field are the same scalar degree of freedom. Kination domination is achieved after inflation through a strong push or "kick" of the inflaton, and sufficient reheating can be achieved depending on model parameters. This allows us to explore both model-dependent and model-independent cosmological predictions of this scenario. We find that measurements of the B-mode CMB polarization can rule out this class of scenarios almost model independently. We also discuss other experimentally accessible signatures for this class of models.
Dark Energy and the Fate of the Universe  [PDF]
Renata Kallosh,Andrei Linde
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1088/1475-7516/2003/02/002
Abstract: It is often assumed that in the course of the evolution of the universe, the dark energy either vanishes or becomes a positive constant. However, recently it was shown that in many models based on supergravity, the dark energy eventually becomes negative and the universe collapses within the time comparable to the present age of the universe. We will show that this conclusion is not limited to the models based on supergravity: In many models describing the present stage of acceleration of the universe, the dark energy eventually becomes negative, which triggers the collapse of the universe within the time t = 10^10-10^11 years. The theories of this type have certain distinguishing features that can be tested by cosmological observations.
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