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Europe had ten Adams
William Wells
Genome Biology , 2000, DOI: 10.1186/gb-spotlight-20001115-01
Abstract:
Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in leprosy
V Chewoolkar, T Bichile, LS Bichile
Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL , 2010,
Abstract: Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to mesenteric venous thrombosis as a part of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and later on succumbed. We thereby wish to highlight the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this potentially fatal condition in patients with infections. KEY WORDS: Antiphospholipid; Antibody; Catastrophic; Leprosy; Syndrome
CATASTROPHIC ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME IN LEPROSY
Dr. Vaibhav Chewoolkar,Dr. Tanmayee Bichile,Dr Lata S Bichile
Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL , 2010,
Abstract: Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to mesenteric venous thrombosis as a part of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and later on succumbed. We thereby wish to highlight the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this potentially fatal condition in patients with infections.
Catastrophic Cardiac Amyloidosis
Prashanth Panduranga,Mohammed Mukhaini
Cardiology Research and Practice , 2011, DOI: 10.4061/2011/479314
Abstract: We report a case of a 61-year-old patient presenting with cardiogenic shock. His echocardiogram suggested typical features of cardiac amyloidosis. This case demonstrates that cardiac amyloidosis can present acutely and may be catastrophic.
The allergic march
E Weinberg
Continuing Medical Education , 2010,
Abstract: The allergic march is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The former term is preferred as it is easier to understand by parents and patients when used during consultations in allergy practice. The common atopic conditions such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema are allergic conditions that occur in families and are associated with the production of specific IgE antibodies to food and environmental allergens.
Asteroids: Assessing Catastrophic Risks  [PDF]
Graciela Chichilnisky,Peter Eisenberger
Journal of Probability and Statistics , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/954750
Abstract: We evaluate two risk profiles: (i) global warming risks and (ii) collisions with asteroids that can cause the extinction of our species. The expected values computed for these two risks suggest that no action will be taken to avoid extinction. The result is somewhat counterintuitive, but it is typical of the results of using classic decision theory to evaluate catastrophic risks in the distant future, see the study by Posner (2004). We establish why expected value is insensitive to catastrophic risks see the study by Chichilnisky (1996), and use another criterion to evaluate risk based on axioms for choice under uncertainty that update the classic Von Neumann theory and require equal treatment for rare and frequent events. Optimizing according to the new criterion is shown to be equivalent to optimizing expected utility with a restriction on the worst outcome in the case of a catastrophe. The evaluation obtained from the new criterion seems more intuitively plausible, and suggests a more practical and realistic approach to catastrophic risks: optimizing expected value while minimizing losses in the case of a catastrophe. 1. Asteroids Sixty five million years ago, an asteroid crashed into earth. Global winds distributed the dust throughout the atmosphere, blocking sunlight, and many life forms that relied on the sun eventually perished. In a short period of time, experts believe, the mighty dinosaurs that dominated our planet went extinct. Realistically the same fate awaits us. Over of the species that have ever existed are now extinct [1, 2]. If our species survives long enough, we will be exposed to an asteroid and could suffer the same fate as the dinosaurs. The data suggests that asteroids of that caliber will hit our planet on average once every million years [2]. The last one was million years ago. Under current conditions, when the next one hits the earth, humans and many other species could go extinct. What should we do about this threat to our survival and others like it? And if the issue is serious, why is this issue getting so little attention whereas the less catastrophic threat of global warming is in the news almost daily? The purpose of this paper is to provide answers to these questions. We examine systematically how to deal with catastrophic risks such as asteroid impacts, which are small-probability events with enormous consequences, events that could threaten the survival of our species, and compare their treatment with risks like global warming that are more imminent and familiar but possibly less catastrophic. The task is not easy.
Household Catastrophic Health Expenditure
A Daneshkohan,M Karami,F Najafi,B Karami Matin
Iranian Journal of Public Health , 2011,
Abstract: Background: Fairness in financial contribution for health was determined by WHO (World Health Report, 2000) as the third goal of health systems which is measured by fairness in financial contribution index (FFCI). The aim of this study was to estimate FFCI and quantify extent of catastrophic household heath expenditures."nMethods: We conducted a descriptive study during May 2008. Subjects were chosen by "Systematic Random sampling" among residents of Maskan's population- based research center (Maskan Center) in Kermanshah, Iran. After complet-ing in-formed consent form, we collected data using a questionnaire by interview with head of family. In order to describing data and estimating FFCI, we used descriptive statistics and WHO methodology, respectively. Households with catastrophic expendi-tures and impoverished households were defined as those with health expenditures over 40% and 50% of their abil-ity to pay, respectively."nResults: The mean age of head of families was 48.96±12.86 years. From 189; 12.7% of household's heads were female. 75.1% of households were covered by at least one health insurance scheme. FFCI was 0.57. The proportion of house-holds fac-ing catastrophic health expenditures was 22.2% (95% CI=16.3%-28.1%)."nConclusion: The rate of FFCI among participants implied an inequality in health financing contribution. In addition, many of households (22.2%) faced catastrophic health expenditures while according to WHO estimation, the figure in the whole coun-try was 2% in 1999. Our study revealed the importance of protecting households against the costs of ill-health.
Catastrophic disruptions revisited  [PDF]
W. Benz,E. Asphaug
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1006/icar.1999.6204
Abstract: We use a smooth particle hydrodynamics method (SPH) to simulate colliding rocky and icy bodies from cm-scale to hundreds of km in diameter, in an effort to define self-consistently the threshold for catastrophic disruption. Unlike previous efforts, this analysis incorporates the combined effects of material strength (using a brittle fragmentation model) and self-gravitation, thereby providing results in the ``strength regime'' and the ``gravity regime'', and in between. In each case, the structural properties of the largest remnant are examined.
Precursors and prediction of catastrophic avalanches  [PDF]
Srutarshi Pradhan,Bikas K. Chakrabarti
Physics , 2006,
Abstract: In this work we review the precursors of catastrophic avalanches (global failures) in several failure models, namely (a) Fiber Bundle Model (FBM), (b) Random Fuse Model (RFM), (c) Sandpile Models and (d) Fractal Overlap Model. The precursor parameters identified here essentially reflect the growing correlations within such systems as they approach their respective failure points. As we show, often they help us to predict the global failure points in advance.
The Dark Side of Leadership: Catastrophic Failure
Michael Petty
Strategic Leadership Review , 2011,
Abstract: Recent history provides us with numerous examples of leadership and organizational failures caused by Black Swans or Predictable Surprises. With enhanced awareness and organizational capacity, leaders will be positioned to grow and sustain their organizations in the presence of catastrophic risk. Today’s leaders are responsible not only for providing a vision of the future and the plans to achieve it, but for protecting their organizations and their followers from catastrophic failures. The recognition and fulfillment of this responsibility is of critical importance to the long-term success and viability of global leaders and their organizations. This article discusses catastrophic failure and its impact on organizations. It builds on Nicholas Taleb’s concept of the Black Swan, Max Bazerman and Michael Watkins’ concept of Predictable Surprises and Jim Collins’ Stage Three Marker of Failure – Denial of Risk and Peril. The article concludes with proposed solutions to help prevent these catastrophic failures in the future.
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