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Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen  [PDF]
Melanie Swan
Journal of Personalized Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/jpm2030093
Abstract: The concepts of health and health care are moving towards the notion of personalized preventive health maintenance and away from an exclusive focus on the cure of disease. This is against the backdrop of contemporary public health challenges that include increasing costs, worsening outcomes, ‘diabesity’ epidemics, and anticipated physician shortages. Personalized preventive medicine could be critical to solving public health challenges at their causal root. This paper sets forth a vision and plan for the realization of preventive medicine by 2050 and examines efforts already underway such as participatory health initiatives, the era of big health data, and qualitative shifts in mindset.
An Examination of the Adverse Effects of Consumer Loans  [cached]
Confidence W. Amadi
International Journal of Business and Management , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ijbm.v7n3p22
Abstract: The dramatic increase in the consumer debt burden and consumer bankruptcies are indications that restrictions should be imposed on the availability of consumer unsecured loans. Financial services firms treat consumer unsecured loans as if they are evaluating business loans. They treat the pool of loan applicants as if they are a pool of insurance applicants Consumers on the other hand see the easy credit as an opportunity to abandon fiscal responsibility and depend on borrowing to meet their consumption needs. The explosion of the real estate market helped support this obsession with debt-financed consumption. This paper discusses the negative effect of consumer debt for consumption and argues that credit card return to its original intent as a convenient means of payment; that all non-investment consumer loans be severely restricted due to its disparaging harmful effect to the segment of the society that can least afford it.
Current Challenge in Consumer Health Informatics: Bridging the Gap between Access to Information and Information Understanding
Laurence Alpay, John Verhoef, Bo Xie, Dov Te’eni and J.H.M. Zwetsloot-Schonk
Biomedical Informatics Insights , 2012,
Abstract: The number of health-related websites has proliferated over the past few years. Health information consumers confront a myriad of health related resources on the internet that have varying levels of quality and are not always easy to comprehend. There is thus a need to help health information consumers to bridge the gap between access to information and information understanding—i.e. to help consumers understand health related web-based resources so that they can act upon it. At the same time health information consumers are becoming not only more involved in their own health care but also more information technology minded. One way to address this issue is to provide consumers with tailored information that is contextualized and personalized e.g. directly relevant and easily comprehensible to the person’s own health situation. This paper presents a current trend in Consumer Health Informatics which focuses on theory-based design and development of contextualized and personalized tools to allow the evolving consumer with varying backgrounds and interests to use online health information efficiently. The proposed approach uses a theoretical framework of communication in order to support the consumer’s capacity to understand health-related web-based resources.
Current Challenge in Consumer Health Informatics: Bridging the Gap between Access to Information and Information Understanding
Laurence Alpay,John Verhoef,Bo Xie,Dov Te’eni
Biomedical Informatics Insights , 2009,
Abstract: The number of health-related websites has proliferated over the past few years. Health information consumers confront a myriad of health related resources on the internet that have varying levels of quality and are not always easy to comprehend. There is thus a need to help health information consumers to bridge the gap between access to information and information understanding—i.e. to help consumers understand health related web-based resources so that they can act upon it. At the same time health information consumers are becoming not only more involved in their own health care but also more information technology minded. One way to address this issue is to provide consumers with tailored information that is contextualized and personalized e.g. directly relevant and easily comprehensible to the person’s own health situation. This paper presents a current trend in Consumer Health Informatics which focuses on theory-based design and development of contextualized and personalized tools to allow the evolving consumer with varying backgrounds and interests to use online health information efficiently. The proposed approach uses a theoretical framework of communication in order to support the consumer’s capacity to understand health-related web-based resources.
Internet Resources of Consumer Health Information Studies  [PDF]
Yu-Tzuon Chou,Chine-Yu Lin
Journal of Library and Information Studies , 2004,
Abstract: Health and medical care has always been an important issue. Recently, there has been a rapid increase in consumer health awareness. Therefore, Consumer Health Information has been vastlyemphasized, which results in the development of associated websites. According to an investigation in Taiwan, there are 1,820 different health and medical related websites in 2002. However, due to the lack of regulations, some of these websites’ information contents may be faulty and may confuse users or potentially be harmful. The purpose of this article is to advise consumers how to differentiate between correct and incorrect information in the Health Information websites. The present study analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of some Taiwan’s consumer health websites by comparing their structures, contents and other information with those provided by "the Top Ten Most Useful Health Information Websites" of the USA. [Article content in Chinese]
Personalized Health Care as a Pathway for the Adoption of Genomic Medicine  [PDF]
Robin Burnette,Leigh Ann Simmons,Ralph Snyderman
Journal of Personalized Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/jpm2040232
Abstract: While the full promise of genomic medicine may be many years in the future, personalized health care (PHC) can begin solving important health care needs now and provide a framework for the adoption of genomic technologies as they are validated. PHC is a strategic approach to medicine that is individualized, predictive, preventive, and involves intense patient engagement. There is great need for more effective models of care as nearly half of Medicare patients age 65 and older have three or more preventable chronic conditions and account for 89% of Medicare’s growing expenditures. With its focus on reactive care, the current health care system is not designed to effectively prevent disease nor manage patients with multiple chronic conditions. PHC may be a solution for improving care for this population and therefore has been adopted as the delivery platform along with a new personalized health plan tool for 230 multi-morbid, homebound Medicare recipients in Durham, North Carolina who have been high utilizers of health care resources. PHC integrates available personalized health technologies, standards of care, and personalized health planning to serve as a model for rational health care delivery. Importantly, the PHC model of care will serve as a market for emerging predictive and personalized technologies to foster genomic medicine.
Translation in Data Mining to Advance Personalized Medicine for Health Equity  [PDF]
Estela A. Estape, Mary Helen Mays, Elizabeth A. Sternke
Intelligent Information Management (IIM) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/iim.2016.81002
Abstract: Personalized medicine is the development of “tailored” therapies that reflect traditional medical approaches with the incorporation of the patient’s unique genetic profile and the environmental basis of the disease. These individualized strategies encompass disease prevention and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. Today’s healthcare workforce is faced with the availability of massive amounts of patient- and disease-related data. When mined effectively, these data will help produce more efficient and effective diagnoses and treatment, leading to better prognoses for patients at both the individual?and population level. Designing preventive and therapeutic interventions for those patients who will benefit most while minimizing side effects and controlling healthcare costs requires bringing diverse data sources together in an analytic paradigm. A resource to clinicians in the development and application of personalized medicine is largely facilitated, perhaps even driven, by the analysis of “big data”. For example, the availability of clinical data warehouses is a significant resource for clinicians in practicing personalized medicine. These “big data” repositories can be queried by clinicians, using specific questions, with data used to gain an understanding of challenges in patient care and treatment. Health informaticians are critical partners to data analytics including the use of technological infrastructures and predictive data mining strategies to access data from multiple sources, assisting clinicians’ interpretation of data and development of personalized, targeted therapy recommendations. In this paper, we look at the concept of personalized medicine, offering perspectives in four important, influencing topics: 1) the availability of “big data” and the role of biomedical informatics in personalized medicine, 2) the need for interdisciplinary teams in the development and evaluation of personalized therapeutic approaches, and 3) the impact of electronic medical record systems and clinical data warehouses on the field of personalized medicine. In closing, we present our fourth perspective, an overview to some of the ethical concerns related to personalized medicine and health equity.
CONSUMER HEALTH INFORMATICS: ETHICS, EVALUATION AND STANDARDS
Berner,Eta S; Singh Sandhu,Amarinder; Goodman,Kenneth W;
Acta bioethica , 2005, DOI: 10.4067/S1726-569X2005000200004
Abstract: this article discusses the ethical issues involved in consumer health informatics -specifically those issues surrounding the provision of medical information for patients on the world wide web. the discussion includes concerns and suggestions relating to: quality control and error avoidance, internet governance and web site responsibility, and intellectual property and control. these issues are argued to be of exceptional importance in the developing world, including latin america and the caribbean
Consumer satisfaction with community mental health care in Durban  [cached]
Renée Almeida,Oluyinka Adejumo
Health SA Gesondheid , 2004, DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v9i1.151
Abstract: This study presents a consumer evaluation of the delivery and aspects of services provided at three community run mental health centres with the aim of using this information to improve the services in future for quality assurance. Opsomming Hierdie studie handel oor 'n verbruikersevaluering van die lewering van dienste en aspekte daarvan wat aan die drie gemeenskapsonder-houdende geestesgesondheidsentra gelewer is met die doel om hierdie inligting te gebruik om die dienste in die toekoms vir kwaliteits-versekering te verbeter. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.
An Altered Treatment Plan Based on Direct to Consumer (DTC) Genetic Testing: Personalized Medicine from the Patient/Pin-cushion Perspective  [PDF]
Jessica D. Tenenbaum,Andra James,Kristin Paulyson-Nu?ez
Journal of Personalized Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/jpm2040192
Abstract: Direct to consumer (DTC) genomic services facilitate the personalized and participatory aspects of “P4” medicine, but raise questions regarding use of genomic data in providing predictive and preventive healthcare. We illustrate the issues involved by describing a pregnancy management case in which a treatment plan was modified based on a DTC result. A woman whose personal and family history were otherwise unremarkable for thromboembolism learned through DTC testing about the presence of a prothrombin (factor 2) gene mutation (rs1799963). Twice daily injections of enoxaparin were recommended throughout pregnancy for this patient who, without prior knowledge of this mutation, would not have been offered such therapy. Moreover, genetically based medical guidelines are a moving target, and treatment of thrombophilic conditions in asymptomatic patients is controversial. We address the state of the art in actionable personalized medicine with respect to clotting disorders in pregnancy, as well as other factors at play— economics, patient preference, and clinical decision support. We also discuss what steps are needed to increase the utility of genomic data in personalized medicine by collecting information and converting it into actionable knowledge.
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