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Mandatory or Flexible: Whither Retirement Age Policy?
A Ibiwoye, AA Adeleke, U Ibekwe
KCA Journal of Business Management , 2011,
Abstract: The debate over whether to end mandatory retirement age policy in favor of flexible retirement policy has heightened. It is argued that it is wasteful to compel productive workers to retire at an arbitrary chronological age and that productivity should be the correct criterion for continued employment. This paper examines the preference between mandatory and flexible retirement age policies based on a survey conducted among workers in Lagos State, the former federal capital of Nigeria. It evaluates the impact of eliminating mandatory retirement age policy on the productivity of Nigerian workers. Particularly, the study investigates the influence of age, gender, income, and duration to retirement on workers’ preference for the type of retirement age policy. The study found that all the factors of interest influence employees’ preference for type of retirement plan and employees are indeed more disposed to flexible retirement. It also found that flexible policy will have a positive welfare effect as many employees can then take care of their extended span of dependants for a longer period and employee productivity will also be improved.
POLICY LESSONS FROM AN UNEXPECTED SOURCE  [cached]
Peter Vale
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies , 2011, DOI: 10.5787/36-2-54
Abstract: Joseph Stiglitz and Linda Bilmes. (2008), The Three Trillion Dollar War. The True Cost of the Iraq Conflict. London: Penguin. 311 pages. In April 2008, Paul Wolfowitz admitted that the US was “pretty much clueless on counterinsurgency” during the first year of the Iraq War. This confession says much about the ongoing war in that country. At that time, it will be remembered, Wolfowitz was the US Deputy Secretary for Defence and together with his boss, the then Secretary of Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, was a leading “Neo-Con” (Neo- Conservative) – as this ever more notorious thread of American foreign policy thinking has been called. Six years on – and well over a million Americans and Iraqis dead – the truth is, at last, seeping through about the invasion of Iraq, its immediate aftermath and the drawn-out war.
2008: The great crisis lessons for Hungarian economic policy  [cached]
Laszlo Gazdag
Perspectives of Innovations, Economics and Business , 2011,
Abstract: The trigger for the worldwide crisis that erupted in 2008 was the poorly conceived tax cutting scheme of US President George W. Bush between 2001 and 2003. These tax cuts which then totalled the equivalent of 15% of the USA’s GNP (USD 1.5 trillion) did not result in investments - as expected - but instead chose the ‘easier’ route of speculative capital. They manipulated the oil market, created significant capacities in the production of biofuels with low efficiency and substantial amounts of government funding, but most of all they exerted an influence on the mortgage loan market. The outcome of it all was irresponsible monetary expansion that generated severe fluctuations in the real economy, and it is this fluctuation that we are now experiencing as the current crisis. This chain of events contains important lessons for Hungarian economic policy that are well worth taking into consideration.
Swine flu: lessons we need to learn from our global experience
Peter Collignon
Emerging Health Threats Journal , 2011, DOI: 10.3402/ehtj.v4i0.7169
Abstract: There are important lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘Swine Flu’ pandemic. Before we call it a pandemic, we need to have appropriate trigger points that involve not only the spread of the virus but also its level of virulence. This was not done for H1N1 (swine flu). We need to ensure that we improve the techniques used in trying to decrease the spread of infection—both in the community and within our hospitals. This means improved infection control and hygiene, and the use of masks, alcohol hand rubs and so on. We also need to have a different approach to vaccines. Effective vaccines were produced only after the epidemic had passed and therefore had relatively little impact in preventing many infections. Mass population strategies involving vaccines and antivirals also misused large amounts of scarce medical resources.
“Whither Taiwanization?” State, Society and Cultural Production in the New Era
Yoshihisa Amae,Jens Damm
Journal of Current Chinese Affairs , 2011,
Abstract: Introduction to Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 1/2011: “Whither Taiwanization?”
Review: Policy lessons from an unexpected source
P Vale
Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies , 2008,
Abstract: In April 2008, Paul Wolfowitz admitted that the US was “pretty much clueless on counterinsurgency”2 during the first year of the Iraq War. This confession says much about the ongoing war in that country. At that time, it will be remembered, Wolfowitz was the US Deputy Secretary for Defence and together with his boss, the then Secretary of Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, was a leading “Neo-Con” (Neo- Conservative) – as this ever more notorious thread of American foreign policy thinking has been called. Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies Vol. 36 (2) 2008: pp. 99-112
Taboos and social contracts: Tools for ecosystem management – lessons from the Manambolomaty Lakes RAMSAR site, western Madagascar
Jeanneney Rabearivony,Eloi Fanameha,Jules Mampiandra,Russell Thorstrom
Madagascar Conservation & Development , 2008,
Abstract: Traditional taboos and social contracts played an importantrole in managing the Manambolomaty RAMSAR site. Taboosare defined as a prohibition imposed by social custom as aprotective measure’ and social contracts are – in conservationsense – a common agreement for achieving conservation,sustainable development and development of resourcesobjectives. The Manambolomaty Lakes RAMSAR site, District ofAntsalova in western Madagascar, is composed of four lakes(Soamalipo, Befotaka, Ankerika and Antsamaka) surroundedby the Tsimembo deciduous forest. The first three lakes withforest surrounding encompass 14,701 ha and are being managedby two local Associations: FIZAMI (FIkambanana ZanatanyAndranobe MIray) and FIFAMA (FIkambanana FAmpandrosoanaMamokatra Ankerika). The associations have used traditionaltaboos and social conventions to manage their local naturalresources by incorporating a GELOSE (GEstion Locale SEcurisée)management system to conserve biological diversity, maintainresource sustainability and socio - economic viability. This sitehas the highest concentration of the endemic and criticallyendangered Madagascar fish eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides),representing 10 % of the global population, and many otherspecies of different faunal groups are also in good conservationstatus such as Decken’s sifaka (Propithecus deckeni) andWestern lesser bamboo lemurs (Hapalemur occidentalis) andMadagascar flying fox (Pteropus rufus). Culturally, the site isknown as a unique source of the endemic tree Hazomalaniavoyroni (Hernandiaceae), which is used by the Sakalava peoplefor constructing coffins, and being buried in a coffin madeof this wood is a great honour for the Sakalava people. FromManambolomaty’s Lakes fish yields, estimated at 60 - 100 tonsper fishing season, FIZAMI and FIFAMA are one of the fewMalagasy Associations with active bank accounts supportedby management of their natural resources and associatedactivities. Their fisheries management system has increasedthe annual local revenue estimated at more than $ 1,562US / fisherman per season. The tax of fish sales to wholesalefish buyers forms 56 % of the two local Commune’s budgets. Thishas made the Community - Based Wetlands Conservation at theManambolomaty Lakes site well known in the conservation circles within Madagascar and has been modelled by other organizationsand associations. Consequently, the ManambolomatyLakes site is in the process of being added into the System ofProtected Areas of Madagascar (SAPM).
Taboos and social contracts: Tools for ecosystem management – lessons from the Manambolomaty Lakes RAMSAR site, western Madagascar
J Rabearivony, E Fanameha, J Mampiandra, R Thorstrom
Madagascar Conservation & Development , 2008,
Abstract: Traditional taboos and social contracts played an important role in managing the Manambolomaty RAMSAR site. Taboos are defined as a prohibition imposed by social custom as a protective measure’ and social contracts are – in conservation sense – a common agreement for achieving conservation, sustainable development and development of resources objectives. The Manambolomaty Lakes RAMSAR site, District of Antsalova in western Madagascar, is composed of four lakes (Soamalipo, Befotaka, Ankerika and Antsamaka) surrounded by the Tsimembo deciduous forest. The first three lakes with forest surrounding encompass 14,701 ha and are being managed by two local Associations: FIZAMI (FIkambanana Zanatany Andranobe MIray) and FIFAMA (FIkambanana FAmpandrosoana Mamokatra Ankerika). The associations have used traditional taboos and social conventions to manage their local natural resources by incorporating a GELOSE (GEstion Locale SEcurisée) management system to conserve biological diversity, maintain resource sustainability and socio - economic viability. This site has the highest concentration of the endemic and critically endangered Madagascar fish eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides), representing 10 % of the global population, and many other species of different faunal groups are also in good conservation status such as Decken’s sifaka (Propithecus deckeni) and Western lesser bamboo lemurs (Hapalemur occidentalis) and Madagascar flying fox (Pteropus rufus). Culturally, the site is known as a unique source of the endemic tree Hazomalania voyroni (Hernandiaceae), which is used by the Sakalava people for constructing coffins, and being buried in a coffin made of this wood is a great honour for the Sakalava people. From Manambolomaty’s Lakes fish yields, estimated at 60 - 100 tons per fishing season, FIZAMI and FIFAMA are one of the few Malagasy Associations with active bank accounts supported by management of their natural resources and associated activities. Their fisheries management system has increased the annual local revenue estimated at more than $ 1,562 US / fisherman per season. The tax of fish sales to wholesale fish buyers forms 56 % of the two local Commune’s budgets. This has made the Community - Based Wetlands Conservation at the Manambolomaty Lakes site well known in the conservation circles within Madagascar and has been modelled vy other organizations and associations. Consequently, the Manambolomaty Lakes site is in the process of being added into the System of Protected Areas of Madagascar (SAPM) (Figure 1).
Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America  [PDF]
Camilla H. Fox,Marc Bekoff
Animals , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/ani1010126
Abstract: Few animals provoke as wide a range of emotions as wolves. Some see wolves as icons of a lost wilderness; others see them as intruders. As the battle continues between wolf proponents and opponents, finding solutions that resolve conflicts while supporting the integrity of nature is challenging. In this essay we argue that we need to make room for wolves and other native carnivores who are re-colonizing areas from which they were extirpated. Strategies that foster coexistence are necessary and wildlife agencies must consider all stakeholders and invest adequate resources to inform the public about how to mitigate conflicts between people/domestic animals, and predators. Values and ethics must be woven into wildlife policy and management and we must be willing to ask difficult ethical questions and learn from past mistakes.
A Multisector Framework for Assessing Community-Based Forest Management: Lessons from Madagascar  [cached]
Daniela B. Raik,Daniel J. Decker
Ecology and Society , 2007,
Abstract: Community-based forest management has proliferated throughout Africa as national governments have decentralized the administration of public forestry. Community-based forestry has taken multiple forms, depending on the assortment of land-tenure systems, forest-use norms, wood demand, and social organization, among others factors. Nature, Wealth, and Power is an analytical framework that has been developed from experiences in natural resource management in Africa. In this paper, we amend the framework to People, Nature, Wealth, and Power (PNWP), and propose it as an analytical lens for community-based forest management initiatives. We use the PNWP framework to assess the responsiveness of contractual forest management in the Menabe region of Madagascar to the interests of local communities, the state forest agency, and conservation nongovernmental organizations. Findings indicate that members of each of the three groups hold some differing interests, which may result in conflict over time. Specifically, interests converge around the Nature and Wealth categories and diverge around the People and Power categories. Also, the contract mechanism for community-based forest management currently being implemented in Menabe does not account for the People and Wealth interests held by any of the three groups. More research is needed, but our inquiry indicates the PNWP framework holds promise for assessing community-based forest management initiatives.
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