oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Diagnostics of dry eye  [PDF]
Stankovi?-Babi? Gordana,Gligorijevi? Jasmina,Zlatanovi? Gordana
Medicinski Pregled , 2011, DOI: 10.2298/mpns1102068s
Abstract: Introduction. Dry eye is a multi-factorial disease of tears and ocular surface resulting in symptoms of discomforts, vision disabilities, unstable tear film and possible damage to the ocular surface. The final diagnosis of dry eye results from collecting various data obtained in the course of several diagnostic procedures. Dry eye - diagnostic methods. Diagnosis of dry eye involves performing a series of clinical methods and laboratory tests. This paper presents some of the procedures used in the diagnosis of dry eye. Biomicroscopy of the eye with objective tests to check the tear film (Schirmer I, rose bengal, time break up precorneal tear film), verification of corneal sensitivity and impression cytology of the conjunctiva, are the optimum dry eye diagnostic routine procedures. Conclusion. The combination of clinical and histopathological methods of examination of the anterior ocular surface is the basis for a quality and precise diagnosis of dry eye.
Hospital epidemiology of dry eye  [cached]
Khurana A,Choudhary R,Ahluwalia B,Gupta S
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1991,
Abstract: One hundred consecutive cases of dry eye were studied to comment upon its epidemiological aspects. The incidence of dry eye amongst ophthalmic outpatients was 0.46% with a male:female ratio of 1:1.22. Fifty seven percent of the patients were above 50 years of age. The incidence was higher amongst outdoor workers and people from rural areas with poor socioeconomic status. The influence of hot and dry climate and nutritional status on dry eye incidence is discussed.
DRY EYE SYNDROME
TAHIR MUMTAZ MALIK
The Professional Medical Journal , 2009,
Abstract: Objective: To determine the frequency of dry eye syndrome in adult patients. Study Design: A descriptive study. Setting: Eye Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Period: From June 2004 to December 2004. Patients and methods: A total of hundred patients were randomly selected from the daily OPD at eye department, MH Rawalpindi. They were tested for the presence of dry eye syndrome by Rose Bengal staining, Schirmer tear strip measurements and Tear film break up time. Results: A total of 67 males and 33 females were recruited. Out of these 10 males and 6 females were found to be having dry eye syndrome. Mean patient age was 34.3±1.3years (range 20–60 years). Conclusion: The frequency of dry eye syndrome in adult patients attending the eye clinic of Military Hospital Rawalpindi is 16%.
Review of hydroxypropyl cellulose ophthalmic inserts for treatment of dry eye  [cached]
Nguyen T,Latkany R
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011,
Abstract: Theresa Nguyen, Robert LatkanyDry Center, Physician Eyecare of New York, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Dry eye syndrome is a prevalent disease that affects visual acuity, activities of daily living, and quality of life. A number of contributory factors affect the severity of dry eye syndrome, including autoimmune disease, environmental surroundings, contact lens use, hormonal changes, anatomical features, chronic inflammation, infections, and iatrogenic factors, such as medications or surgery. Symptoms may include intermittent or constant blurry vision, discomfort, burning, foreign body sensation, hyperemia, dryness, and photophobia. The severity of dry eye syndrome can range from very mild disease to extremely severe cases with vision-threatening consequences. A variety of dry eye treatment modalities exist to address the different causes, symptoms, and consequences of ocular surface disease, including artificial tears, lubricating gels, ophthalmic inserts, anti-inflammatory drops, and surgical procedures. In this paper, an assortment of literature pertaining to the treatment of dry eye syndrome, in particular hydroxypropyl cellulose ophthalmic inserts, is reviewed. These inserts can be used effectively as monotherapy, or in conjunction with other therapies, and should be considered in the treatment of dry eye syndrome.Keywords: hydroxypropyl cellulose ophthalmic inserts, dry eye, punctal occlusion, ocular surface disease
Impact of dry eye on work productivity  [cached]
Yamada M,Mizuno Y,Shigeyasu C
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research , 2012,
Abstract: Masakazu Yamada, Yoshinobu Mizuno, Chika ShigeyasuNational Institute of Sensory Organs, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dry eye on work productivity of office workers, especially in terms of presenteeism.Methods: A total of 396 individuals aged ≥20 years (258 men and 138 women, mean age 43.4 ± 13.0 years) were recruited through an online survey. Data from 355 responders who did not have missing values were included in the analysis. They were classified into the following four groups according to the diagnostic status and subjective symptoms of dry eye: a definite dry eye group; a marginal dry eye group; a self-reported dry eye group; and a control group. The impact of dry eye on work productivity was evaluated using the Japanese version of the Work Limitations Questionnaire. The cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye and the economic benefits of providing treatment for dry eye were also assessed.Results: The degree of work performance loss was 5.65% in the definite dry eye group, 4.37% in the marginal dry eye group, 6.06% in the self-reported dry eye group, and 4.27% in the control group. Productivity in the self-reported dry eye group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). The annual cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye was estimated to be USD 741 per person.Conclusion: Dry eye impairs work performance among office workers, which may lead to a substantial loss to industry. Management of symptoms of dry eye by providing treatment may contribute to improvement in work productivity.Keywords: burden of disease, dry eye, presenteeism, quality of life
Impact of dry eye on work productivity
Yamada M, Mizuno Y, Shigeyasu C
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S36352
Abstract: ct of dry eye on work productivity Original Research (1324) Total Article Views Authors: Yamada M, Mizuno Y, Shigeyasu C Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 307 - 312 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S36352 Received: 25 July 2012 Accepted: 11 September 2012 Published: 10 October 2012 Masakazu Yamada, Yoshinobu Mizuno, Chika Shigeyasu National Institute of Sensory Organs, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dry eye on work productivity of office workers, especially in terms of presenteeism. Methods: A total of 396 individuals aged ≥20 years (258 men and 138 women, mean age 43.4 ± 13.0 years) were recruited through an online survey. Data from 355 responders who did not have missing values were included in the analysis. They were classified into the following four groups according to the diagnostic status and subjective symptoms of dry eye: a definite dry eye group; a marginal dry eye group; a self-reported dry eye group; and a control group. The impact of dry eye on work productivity was evaluated using the Japanese version of the Work Limitations Questionnaire. The cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye and the economic benefits of providing treatment for dry eye were also assessed. Results: The degree of work performance loss was 5.65% in the definite dry eye group, 4.37% in the marginal dry eye group, 6.06% in the self-reported dry eye group, and 4.27% in the control group. Productivity in the self-reported dry eye group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). The annual cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye was estimated to be USD 741 per person. Conclusion: Dry eye impairs work performance among office workers, which may lead to a substantial loss to industry. Management of symptoms of dry eye by providing treatment may contribute to improvement in work productivity.
Therapeutical approach to dry eye syndrome
Stankovi?-Babi? Gordana,Zlatanovi? Gordana,?or?evi?-Joci? Jasmina,Ceki? Sonja
Medicinski Pregled , 2010, DOI: 10.2298/mpns1012793s
Abstract: Introduction. Dry eye disease or dysfunctional tear syndrome is among the most frequently established diagnoses in ophthalmology. It can be defined as a disorder of the tear film resulting in changes in the ocular surface. Mechanisms in development of dry eye disease. There are many factors causing dry eye and they can be related to deficiency in any of the components of the tear film. It has been suggested that dry eye is an inflammatory disorder that affects the ocular surface and lacrimal gland. Inflammation is the most important mechanism of corneal and conjunctival cell damage, which is responsible for the symptoms and signs of ocular surface pathology. Hormonal imbalance (particularly androgens), neural dysfunction, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and loss of immune homeostasis of the lacrimal gland and ocular surface could be possible mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dry eye disease. Discussion. The aim of this paper was to review the advances in the pathogenesis and management of the dry eye disease. The appropriate dry eye treatment presupposes knowledge of all existing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapeutic modalities. The mainstay of therapy is still artificial tears, with anti-inflammatory therapy and punctual occlusion therapy as second and third line therapies.
The challenge of dry eye diagnosis  [cached]
Giacomo Savini,Pinita Prabhawasat,Takashi Kojima,Martin Grueterich
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2008,
Abstract: Giacomo Savini1, Pinita Prabhawasat2, Takashi Kojima3, Martin Grueterich4, Edgar Espana5, Eiki Goto61Centro Salus, Bologna, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand; 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig–Maximilians University, Munich, Germany; 5Department of Ophthalmology, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, USA; 6Department of Ophthalmology, School of Dental Medicine, Tsurumi University, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, JapanAbstract: The currently available methods for the diagnosis of dry eye are still far from being perfect for a variety of reasons. This review attempts to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional tests (such as Schirmer’s test, break-up time and ocular surface staining) and innovative noninvasive procedures, including tear meniscus height measurement, corneal topography, functional visual acuity, tear interferometry, tear evaporimetry and tear osmolarity assessment.
The Role of Medications in Causing Dry Eye  [PDF]
Frederick T. Fraunfelder,James J. Sciubba,William D. Mathers
Journal of Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/285851
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to review the possible role of polypharmacy in causing dry eye disease (DED), reflecting the complex interactions and complications associated with the use of multiple systemic and topical ocular medications. The pharmacological, physiological, anatomical, and histological mechanisms causing dry mouth differ little from those causing dry eye. Oral polypharmacy is the most common cause of dry mouth, but has not been investigated as a cause of dry eye. Topical ocular polypharmacy has been shown to cause DED. Information on drugs that likely cause or aggravate DED and the controversial role of preservatives in topical ocular medications are examined. Systemic or topical ocular medications and preservatives used in topical ocular drugs may cause dry eye through the drug's therapeutic action, ocular surface effects, or preservatives, and the effects probably are additive. Long-term use of topical ocular medications, especially those containing preservatives such as BAK, may play an important role in DED and the role of polypharmacy needs further study. We review possible ways to decrease the risk of medication-related dry eye.
The Role of Medications in Causing Dry Eye  [PDF]
Frederick T. Fraunfelder,James J. Sciubba,William D. Mathers
Journal of Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/285851
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to review the possible role of polypharmacy in causing dry eye disease (DED), reflecting the complex interactions and complications associated with the use of multiple systemic and topical ocular medications. The pharmacological, physiological, anatomical, and histological mechanisms causing dry mouth differ little from those causing dry eye. Oral polypharmacy is the most common cause of dry mouth, but has not been investigated as a cause of dry eye. Topical ocular polypharmacy has been shown to cause DED. Information on drugs that likely cause or aggravate DED and the controversial role of preservatives in topical ocular medications are examined. Systemic or topical ocular medications and preservatives used in topical ocular drugs may cause dry eye through the drug's therapeutic action, ocular surface effects, or preservatives, and the effects probably are additive. Long-term use of topical ocular medications, especially those containing preservatives such as BAK, may play an important role in DED and the role of polypharmacy needs further study. We review possible ways to decrease the risk of medication-related dry eye. 1. Introduction In this paper, three researchers with different primary research interests (ocular toxicology FTF, dry mouth JJS, and dry eye WDM) examine several hypotheses concerning medications and their possible roles in causing DED. Hypothesis-driven studies are especially difficult for dry eye since diagnosis of this disease relies in part on subjective testing. In the future, perhaps testing such as osmolarity [1], standardized meibomian gland tests [2, 3], Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography [4], and so forth will be incorporated into clinical practice and will provide a greater degree of repeatability and predictability than is currently available. Until these become available, the studies cited here are heavily dependent on subjective assessments, case reports, and summaries of expert committees or organizations. The data presented here may be speculative and lacking quantification, but may be conceptually useful until a more evidence-based understanding of dry eye is achieved. This paper is also an attempt to give the clinician some guidelines to assist in their clinical decision making. 2. Hypothesis 1: If a Systemic Medication Causes Dry Mouth, It May Also Cause or Aggravate Dry Eye The similarity between keeping the eye and mouth moist is striking. The autonomic nervous system and nerve supply and function are nearly identical. The primary secretory glands of the eye are the main and
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.