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Hyaluronic acid gel fillers in the management of facial aging  [cached]
Fredric S Brandt,Alex Cazzaniga
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2008,
Abstract: Fredric S Brandt1, Alex Cazzaniga21Private Practice in Coral Gables, Florida, USA and Manhattan, NY, USA, and Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Research Institute, Coral Gables, Florida, USAAbstract: Time affects facial aging by producing cellular and anatomical changes resulting in the consequential loss of soft tissue volume. With the advent of new technologies, the physician has the opportunity of addressing these changes with the utilization of dermal fillers. Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are the most popular, non-permanent injectable materials available to physicians today for the correction of soft tissue defects of the face. This material provides an effective, non invasive, non surgical alternative for correction of the contour defects of the face due to its enormous ability to bind water and easiness of implantation. HA dermal fillers are safe and effective. The baby-boomer generation, and their desire of turning back the clock while enjoying an active lifestyle, has expanded the popularity of these fillers. In the US, there are currently eight HA dermal fillers approved for commercialization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This article reviews the innate properties of FDA-approved HA fillers and provides an insight on future HA products and their utilization for the management of the aging face.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, aging face, dermal filler, wrinkles, Restylane, Perlane, Juvéderm
Hyaluronic acid gel (Juvéderm™) preparations in the treatment of facial wrinkles and folds  [cached]
Inja Bogdan Allemann,Leslie Baumann
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2009,
Abstract: Inja Bogdan Allemann, Leslie BaumannUniversity of Miami Cosmetic Group, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami Heart Institute, Miami Beach, Florida, USAAbstract: Soft tissue augmentation with temporary dermal fillers is a continuously growing field, supported by the ongoing development and advances in technology and biocompatibility of the products marketed. The longer lasting, less immunogenic and thus more convenient hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are encompassing by far the biggest share of the temporary dermal filler market. Since the approval of the first HA filler, Restylane , there are at least 10 HA fillers that have been approved by the FDA. Not all of the approved HA fillers are available on the market, and many more are coming. The Juvéderm product line (Allergan, Irvine, CA), consisting of Juvéderm Plus and Juvéderm Ultra Plus, was approved by the FDA in 2006. Juvéderm is a bacterium-derived nonanimal stabilized HA. Juvéderm Ultra and Ultra Plus are smooth, malleable gels with a homologous consistency that use a new technology called “Hylacross technology”. They have a high concentration of cross-linked HAs, which accounts for its longevity. Juvéderm Ultra Plus is used for volumizing and correcting deeper folds, whereas Juvéderm Ultra is best for contouring and volumizing medium depth facial wrinkles and lip augmentation. Various studies have shown the superiority of the HA filler products compared with collagen fillers for duration, volume needed, and patient satisfaction. Restylane , Perlane , and Juvéderm are currently the most popular dermal fillers used in the United States.Keywords: hyaluronic acid gel, Juvéderm , facial wrinkles, facial folds
Use of hyaluronic acid fillers for the treatment of the aging face  [cached]
Michael H Gold
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2007,
Abstract: Michael H GoldGold Skin Care Center, Tennessee Clinical Research Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical School,Vanderbilt University Nursing School, Nashville, TN, USA; Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: Hyaluronic acid fillers have become popular soft tissue filler augmentation agents over the past several years. They have helped revolutionize the filler market with a number of new products available for use for our patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the characteristics of the HA fillers and to review each of the current products currently available for use in the US.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, fillers, soft tissue augmentation, expression lines, aging face, collagen
The evolving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview  [cached]
Muhn C,Rosen N,Solish N,Bertucci V
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2012,
Abstract: Channy Muhn,1 Nathan Rosen,1 Nowell Solish,2 Vince Bertucci,2 Mark Lupin,3 Alain Dansereau,4 Fred Weksberg,5 B Kent Remington,6 Arthur Swift71Division of Dermatology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2Division of Dermatology, New Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, 4Private Practice, Repentigny, Québec, 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 6Private Practice, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 7St Mary's Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Recent advancements, including more versatile facial fillers, refined injection techniques and the adoption of a global facial approach, have contributed to improved patient outcome and increased patient satisfaction. Nine Canadian specialists (eight dermatologists, one plastic surgeon) collaborated to develop an overview on volume restoration and contouring based on published literature and their collective clinical experience. The specialists concurred that optimal results in volume restoration and contouring depend on correcting deficiencies at various layers of the facial envelope. This includes creating a foundation for deep structural support in the supraperiosteal or submuscular plane; volume repletion of subcutaneous fat compartments; and the reestablishment of dermal and subdermal support to minimize cutaneous rhytids, grooves and furrows. It was also agreed that volume restoration and contouring using a global facial approach is essential to create a natural, youthful appearance in facial aesthetics. A comprehensive non-surgical approach should therefore incorporate combining fillers such as high-viscosity, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA) for structural support and hyaluronic acid (HA) for lines, grooves and furrows with neuromodulators, lasers and energy devices.Keywords: hyaluronic acid filler, volumizing, facial rejuvenation
The evolving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview
Muhn C, Rosen N, Solish N, Bertucci V, Lupin M, Dansereau A, Weksberg F, Remington BK, Swift A
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S30794
Abstract: lving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview Review (1938) Total Article Views Authors: Muhn C, Rosen N, Solish N, Bertucci V, Lupin M, Dansereau A, Weksberg F, Remington BK, Swift A Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 147 - 158 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S30794 Received: 11 February 2012 Accepted: 23 May 2012 Published: 05 October 2012 Channy Muhn,1 Nathan Rosen,1 Nowell Solish,2 Vince Bertucci,2 Mark Lupin,3 Alain Dansereau,4 Fred Weksberg,5 B Kent Remington,6 Arthur Swift7 1Division of Dermatology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2Division of Dermatology, New Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, 4Private Practice, Repentigny, Québec, 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 6Private Practice, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 7St Mary's Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada Abstract: Recent advancements, including more versatile facial fillers, refined injection techniques and the adoption of a global facial approach, have contributed to improved patient outcome and increased patient satisfaction. Nine Canadian specialists (eight dermatologists, one plastic surgeon) collaborated to develop an overview on volume restoration and contouring based on published literature and their collective clinical experience. The specialists concurred that optimal results in volume restoration and contouring depend on correcting deficiencies at various layers of the facial envelope. This includes creating a foundation for deep structural support in the supraperiosteal or submuscular plane; volume repletion of subcutaneous fat compartments; and the reestablishment of dermal and subdermal support to minimize cutaneous rhytids, grooves and furrows. It was also agreed that volume restoration and contouring using a global facial approach is essential to create a natural, youthful appearance in facial aesthetics. A comprehensive non-surgical approach should therefore incorporate combining fillers such as high-viscosity, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA) for structural support and hyaluronic acid (HA) for lines, grooves and furrows with neuromodulators, lasers and energy devices.
Soft tissue augmentation - Use of hyaluronic acid as dermal filler
Vedamurthy Maya
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2004,
Abstract: Soft tissue augmentation has revolutionized the treatment of the aging face. It is a technique in which a substance is injected under the skin. The concept of utilizing materials for soft tissue augmentation actually began around 1950 with the use of fluid silicone. Today we have a large armamentarium of implant materials to delay the tell tale signs of aging. Filling has replaced conventional surgery in facial rejuvenation. In this article, the emphasis will be on hyaluronic acid as this substance is easily available in India and ranks among the most widely used dermal fillers.
Soft tissue augmentation - Use of hyaluronic acid as dermal filler  [cached]
Vedamurthy Maya
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2004,
Abstract: Soft tissue augmentation has revolutionized the treatment of the aging face. It is a technique in which a substance is injected under the skin. The concept of utilizing materials for soft tissue augmentation actually began around 1950 with the use of fluid silicone. Today we have a large armamentarium of implant materials to delay the tell tale signs of aging. Filling has replaced conventional surgery in facial rejuvenation. In this article, the emphasis will be on hyaluronic acid as this substance is easily available in India and ranks among the most widely used dermal fillers.
A Placebo-Controlled Study Demonstrates the Long-Lasting Anti-Aging Benefits of a Cream Containing Retinol, DihydroxyMethylChromone (DMC) and Hyaluronic Acid  [PDF]
Thierry Oddos, Romain Roure, James Leyden, Valérie Bruère, Christiane Bertin
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications (JCDSA) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2012.22012
Abstract: Retinol is an ingredient used in cosmetic products for reducing the appearance of the signs of aging and photo-damage. Currently, most of these products contain 0.1% of retinol. However, at this concentration, some irritation can occur. We have evaluated in vitro and in a clinical study the potential efficacy of a combination of actives to improve the facial skin aging signs while using low concentration of retinol. We demonstrated, in vitro, that a chromone derivative, 5,7-di-hydroxy-2-methyl chromone (DMC), is able to enhance the collagen synthesis in culture of normal human dermal fibroblasts. The enhancement of retinol anti-wrinkle efficacy by DMC was confirmed in a small scale clinical trial. Specifically, a product associating low concentration of retinol (0.04%) and DMC (0.1%) in combination with low molecular weight hyaluronic acid fragments (50,000 Dalton of average molecular weight) has been applied topically for 8 weeks. Clinical results show significant improvement of various signs of facial skin aging such as wrinkles, pigmentary spots, tone unevenness, dullness and the overall photo-damage score. Improvements were still visible 4 weeks after the cessation of the test product application. This study demonstrates that significant lasting improvement of facial skin aging can be obtained with well tolerated low concentration of retinol when adequately formulated with other anti-aging ingredients.
Use of cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose for soft-tissue augmentation: preliminary clinical studies  [cached]
Mauro Leonardis,Andrea Palange,Rodrigo FV Dornelles,et al
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2010,
Abstract: Mauro Leonardis1, Andrea Palange2, Rodrigo FV Dornelles3, Felipe Hund41Department of Plastic Surgery, Salvator Mundi International Hospital, Roma, Italy; 2Department of Aesthetic Medicine, Fisiobios, Roma, Italy; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Núcleo de Plástica Avan ada, S o Paulo, SP, Brazil; 4Department of Plastic Surgery, Consultorio de Cirurgia Plastica, Criciuma, SC, BrazilPurpose: The continual search for new products for soft-tissue augmentation has in recent years led to the introduction of long lasting alternatives to hyaluronic acids and collagen that are composed of other polymers able to improve clinical persistence over time. This is the first report in which sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) has been chemically treated by the cross-linking process and thus used as a hydrogel for soft-tissue augmentation through injection with thin needles. The study evaluates, from a clinical point of view, the behavior of cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel used in the aesthetic field and its side effects so as to check the safety and performance of the polymer following intradermal injections.Patients and methods: This work shows the preliminary results of an ongoing clinical study conducted between 2006 and 2009, performed on 84 healthy volunteers (62 females, 22 males) aged between 18 and 72 years, for the treatment of 168 nasolabial folds, 45 perioral wrinkles, and 39 lip volume.Results: Study results show an excellent correction of facial defects. Tolerance and aesthetic quality of the correction obtained indicate considerable safety features and absence of side effects. From a clinical point of view, hydrogel is gradually absorbed into the injection site without migration issues.Conclusion: Cross-linked CMC hydrogel proves to be an ideal agent for soft tissue augmentation with regard to safety and ease of application. It did not cause infection, extrusion, migration, or adverse reactions in the patients who have been followed for two years. Delayed aesthetic results on facial wrinkles were very satisfactory.Keywords: dermal fillers, facial aging, cosmetic, hyaluronic acid, facial wrinkles, facial fold
The Neglected Importance of Sleep on the Formation and Aggravation of Facial Wrinkles and Their Prevention  [PDF]
Borut Poljsak, Aleksandar Godic, Andrej Starc, Raja Dahmane
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications (JCDSA) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2016.63012
Abstract: The duration of sleep and the position of the face while resting on a pillow have a negative impact on the facial skin appearance and may lead to the formation of sleep wrinkles. Sleep lines occur when there is repetitive, long-term tension on the facial skin, which pushes or pulls the skin in a direction that is perpendicular to the direction of the muscles of the face. These lines tend to be more vertically oriented than expression lines and can be found on the forehead, around the eyebrows, the eyes, the cheeks, the chin, and the nasolabial folds. Our studies revealed that the average reduction of wrinkles in total investigated area of the face (expressed as the density of wrinkle per surface skin) was approximately 12% after 28 days of sleep on a specially-designed pillow. The specially designed anti-wrinkle pillows eliminate the pressure on the cheeks, the eyes and the mouth during sleep. Many such pillows have been designed to reduce the aging process and to encourage users to sleep in specific positions. Evidence supporting the claim that a special pillow prevents wrinkles was presented. Nevertheless, prolonged human studies are required to further elucidate the role of sleeping on appearance of facial wrinkles.
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