oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Emerging dermatological and systemic applications of ustekinumab: beyond its clinical use in psoriasis
Kapoor S
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S32149
Abstract: Emerging dermatological and systemic applications of ustekinumab: beyond its clinical use in psoriasis Letter (1892) Total Article Views Authors: Kapoor S Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 59 - 60 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S32149 Received: 23 March 2012 Accepted: 23 March 2012 Published: 21 June 2012 Shailendra Kapoor Richmond, VA,USA I read with great interest the paper by Uhlenhake and Mehregan in a recent issue of your journal.1 The article is highly thought-provoking. Interestingly, the past few years have seen increased use of ustekinumab in clinical applications other than psoriasis. View the original article by Uhlenhake and Mehregan. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Morgellons disease: Analysis of a population with clinically confirmed microscopic subcutaneous fibers of unknown etiology Ustekinumab: differential use in psoriasis Investigation of Borrelia burgdorferi genotypes in Australia obtained from erythema migrans tissue Efficacy of chlorhexidine gluconate ointment (Oronine H ) for experimentally-induced comedones Interest of corrective makeup in the management of patients in dermatology Condyloma-like squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva: report of two midline cases Zinc ascorbate has superoxide dismutase-like activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Emerging technologies for the detection of melanoma: achieving better outcomes A phosphatidylcholine hyaluronic acid chitin–nanofibrils complex for a fast skin remodeling and a rejuvenating look Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease
Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments  [PDF]
William J Gray,Evan Scannapieco
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/768/2/174
Abstract: Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, $Z \approx 0.1 Z_\odot $ filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, $Z=10^{-3} Z_\odot$ filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.
Evolution, interaction and collisions of vortex filaments  [PDF]
Valeria Banica,Evelyne Miot
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: Several progresses have been done very recently on models for the dynamics of one or more vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. In this article we survey the recent and previous results in this topic. We also present some new situations of filaments collapse.
Morgellons disease, illuminating an undefined illness: a case series
William T Harvey, Robert C Bransfield, Dana E Mercer, Andrew J Wright, Rebecca M Ricchi, Mary M Leitao
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2009, DOI: 10.4076/1752-1947-3-8243
Abstract: Clinical information was collected from 25 of 30 consecutive self-defined patients with Morgellons disease consisting of laboratory data, medical history and physical examination findings. Abnormalities were quantified and grouped by system, then compared and summarized, but the numbers were too small for more complex mathematical analysis. The quantification of physical and laboratory abnormalities allowed at least the creation of a practical clinical boundary, separating probable Morgellons from non-Morgellons patients. All the 25 patients studied meet the most commonly used DP definitions.These data suggest Morgellons disease can be characterized as a physical human illness with an often-related delusional component in adults. All medical histories support that behavioral aberrancies onset only after physical symptoms. The identified abnormalities include both immune deficiency and chronic inflammatory markers that correlate strongly with immune cytokine excess. The review of 251 current NLM DP references leads us to the possibility that Morgellons disease and DP are grossly truncated labels of the same illness but with the reversal of the cause-effect order. Further, the patients' data suggest that both illnesses have an infectious origin.The term "Morgellons disease" first publicly appeared on the Internet in 2002. The "index" case was the first modern case to which that label was appended: a sick child whose physical signs and symptoms were collectively unrecognized as an entity at local and regional medical facilities. As the child's illness persisted without recognition or resolution, the unaffected parent sought similar illness descriptions from historic medical references, eventually settling on "The Morgellons", a label given to childhood cases described in France in 1674 by Sir Thomas Browne [1]. His description was limited to its dermal components: hair-like extrusions and sensations of movement. Ettmuller, a physician, produced the only known drawings
Lateral downflows in sunspot penumbral filaments and their temporal evolution  [PDF]
S. Esteban Pozuelo,L. R. Bellot Rubio,J. de la Cruz Rodriguez
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/803/2/93
Abstract: We study the temporal evolution of downflows observed at the lateral edges of penumbral filaments in a sunspot located very close to the disk center. Our analysis is based on a sequence of nearly diffraction-limited scans of the Fe I 617.3 nm line taken with the CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. We compute Dopplergrams from the observed intensity profiles using line bisectors and filter the resulting velocity maps for subsonic oscillations. Lateral downflows appear everywhere in the center-side penumbra as small, weak patches of redshifts next to or along the edges of blueshifted flow channels. These patches have an intermittent life and undergo mergings and fragmentations quite frequently. The lateral downflows move together with the hosting filaments and react to their shape variations, very much resembling the evolution of granular convection in the quiet Sun. There is a good relation between brightness and velocity of the flow structures in the center-side penumbra, with downflows being darker than upflows on average, which is again reminiscent of quiet Sun convection. These results point to the existence of overturning convection in sunspot penumbrae, with elongated cells forming filaments where the flow is upward but very inclined, and weak lateral downward flows. In general, the circular polarization profiles emerging from the lateral downflows do not show sign reversals, although sometimes we detect three-lobed profiles which are suggestive of opposite magnetic polarities in the pixel.
Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease  [cached]
Middelveen MJ,Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2011,
Abstract: Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B StrickerInternational Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.Keywords: Digital dermatitis, Morgellons disease, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes
Biochemical, Biophysical and Mechanical Characterization of Decellularized Dermal Implants  [PDF]
Frederick H. Silver, Dale DeVore, Ruchit Shah
Materials Sciences and Applications (MSA) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/msa.2017.812064
Abstract: Allografts have been used in a variety of applications to augment as well as replace tissues throughout the body. A number of steps are involved in selection, harvesting, processing and testing of dermal allografts. Grafts can be obtained that are: free of antibodies to viruses and low in viral titers. Cellular material can be eliminated from the tissue and the product becomes almost exclusively a collagen fiber network. The purpose of this paper is to examine the changes in collagen structure and properties that occur during processing of decellularized dermis. The results indicate that collagen fiber swelling occurs during processing although the product preserves the native collagen banding pattern at the fibrillar structural level. Fiber swelling and decreased collagen deformability of processed dermis, may lead to stress concentration at the implant-tissue interface and up-regulation of mechanotransduction. This may lead to premature mechanical failure due to creation of a chronic inflammatory condition at the implant-tissue interface. It is suggested that all dermal allografts be oriented such that Langer’s lines of the implant match those of the host tissue, and that wound closure by suturing be done under conditions that preserve the normal tension in skin in order to minimize implant-interfacial failure.
Modelling the chemical evolution of star forming filaments  [PDF]
D. Seifried,S. Walch
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. 2014). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate and find chemical and physical results in accordance with observations and other recent numerical work.
Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ, Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S26183
Abstract: ment formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease Perspectives (16534) Total Article Views Authors: Middelveen MJ, Stricker RB Published Date November 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 167 - 177 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S26183 Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared.
Generation and Characterization of Multipotent Stem Cells from Established Dermal Cultures  [PDF]
Rebecca P. Hill, Karl Gledhill, Aaron Gardner, Claire A. Higgins, Heather Crawford, Clifford Lawrence, Christopher J. Hutchison, William A. Owens, Bo Kara, S. Elizabeth James, Colin A. B. Jahoda
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050742
Abstract: Human multipotent skin derived precursor cells (SKPs) are traditionally sourced from dissociated dermal tissues; therefore, donor availability may become limiting. Here we demonstrate that both normal and diseased adult human dermal fibroblasts (DF) pre-cultured in conventional monolayers are capable of forming SKPs (termed m-SKPs). Moreover, we show that these m-SKPs can be passaged and that cryopreservation of original fibroblast monolayer cultures does not reduce m-SKP yield; however, extensive monolayer passaging does. Like SKPs generated from dissociated dermis, these m-SKPs expressed nestin, fibronectin and versican at the protein level. At the transcriptional level, m-SKPs derived from normal adult human DF, expressed neural crest stem cell markers such as p75NTR, embryonic stem cell markers such as Nanog and the mesenchymal stem cell marker Dermo-1. Furthermore, appropriate stimuli induced m-SKPs to differentiate down either mesenchymal or neural lineages resulting in lipid accumulation, calcification and S100β or β-III tubulin expression (with multiple processes). m-SKP yield was greater from neonatal foreskin cultures compared to those from adult DF cultures; however, the former showed a greater decrease in m-SKP forming capacity after extensive monolayer passaging. m-SKP yield was greater from adult DF cultures expressing more alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). In turn, elevated αSMA expression correlated with cells originating from specimens isolated from biopsies containing more terminal hair follicles; however, αSMA expression was lost upon m-SKP formation. Others have shown that dissociated human hair follicle dermal papilla (DP) are a highly enriched source of SKPs. However, conversely and unexpectedly, monolayer cultured human hair follicle DP cells failed to form m-SKPs whereas those from the murine vibrissae follicles did. Collectively, these findings reveal the potential for using expanded DF cultures to produce SKPs, the heterogeneity of SKP forming potential of skin from distinct anatomical locations and ages, and question the progenitor status of human hair follicle DP cells.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.