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The Improvement of Leadership Development in the Healthcare Sector: A Case Study in Japanese Hospitals  [PDF]
Neville Greening
Open Journal of Leadership (OJL) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ojl.2019.82003
Abstract: The healthcare industry faces unique challenges that set it apart from other types of industries. Healthcare leaders and staff experience high environmental complexities that require a unique combination of leadership skills and knowledge. Leadership is increasingly emerging as a significant strategic business imperative for medical organizations, in their attempt to adapt to and anticipate dynamics to keep up with market trends (Wheelen, Hunger, Hoffman, & Bamford, 2017). As front-line healthcare providers, doctors, and nurses require essential leadership and managerial skills to carry out their duties efficiently. Harden & Laidlaw (2017) postulate that effective communication in the healthcare sector is an essential tool for providing all stakeholders with clarity and satisfaction, while ineffective communication can lead to patient dissatisfaction, confusion, anxiety, or illness. The contemplated research examines the above through an analysis of leadership development and performance management in the healthcare sector. The primary objective of this research is to address the core competencies that a healthcare leader should develop and to build a new model or framework for leadership development in the Japanese healthcare industry.
The Patchwork Text Assessment – An Integral Component of Constructive Alignment Curriculum Methodology to Support Healthcare Leadership Development
Leigh J. A.,Rutherford J.,Wild J.,Cappleman J.
Journal of Education and Training Studies , 2013, DOI: 10.11114/jets.v1i1.83
Abstract: Background: A responsive and innovative postgraduate programme curriculum that produces an effective and competent multi professional healthcare leader whom can lead within the United Kingdom (UK) and international healthcare context offers a promising approach to contributing towards the challenging global healthcare agenda Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of utilising constructive alignment curricular methodology incorporating the Patchwork Text Assessment on the healthcare leadership development of UK and international postgraduate students Design: Case study design, incorporating Kirkpatrick's Five Levels of Evaluation Model Settings and Participants: 12 post graduate students (multi-professional, UK and international) studying on a healthcare leadership and management programme at one UK University in the North West of England. Methods: Rretrieval of the critical commentary produced and submitted by students as part of the Patchwork Text Assessment process Data Analysis: Thematic content analysis approach Results: Four key themes emerged demonstrating how the success of constructive alignment and the Patchwork Text Assessment in promoting deep learning for UK and international postgraduate healthcare leadership students is underpinned by principles of good practice and these include: a) Curriculum planners incorporating work based learning activities into the generated learning activities b) Curriculum planners creating the best learning environment so the student can achieve the learning activities c) Providing the learning activities that reflect the real world of healthcare leadership d) Providing students with opportunities to contextualise theory and practice through relevant patchwork activity and learning activities e) Equipping students with the transferable postgraduate skills (through learning activities and patch working) to embark on a journey of lifelong learning and continuous professional development f) Targeting the postgraduate programme /module intended learning outcomes and assessment patches against contemporary leadership qualities frameworks g) Providing students with opportunities to reflect in multi- professional groups that remain constant in terms of facilitator and supervisor h) Creating the learning opportunities for students to apply their learning to their own healthcare organisation
Charge Nurse Perspectives on Frontline Leadership in Acute Care Environments  [PDF]
Rose O. Sherman,Ruth Schwarzkopf,Anna J. Kiger
ISRN Nursing , 2011, DOI: 10.5402/2011/164052
Abstract: A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed. 1. Introduction The recent Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health [1] includes a recommendation that nurses should be prepared and enabled to lead change to advance healthcare in the United States. It is noted in the report that strong leadership at every level is critical if the vision of a transformed health care system is to be realized, and nurses are to participate as full partners with physicians and other health professionals. In the current environment, nurses are often placed in leadership situations without the needed competencies and skills to meet these challenges and other important organizational imperatives. This is especially true for professional nurses who are asked to assume frontline leadership roles such as that of charge nurse. With rising patient acuity, decreased lengths of stay, staffing shortages, pay for performance measures and new technologies, the context of health care environments has significantly changed, and these roles have become more complex. Porter-O’Grady and Malloch [2] have noted that the demands of leadership change as the world changes. Stepping back and reconsidering the skill sets and competencies that leaders need is an important exercise in planning for the future. The nurse executive leadership of Tenet Healthcare, who has responsibility for 49 acute care facilities and one long-term care facility in the United States, has committed to a journey to develop frontline nurse leaders. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today’s acute care environment. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings
The Leadership Gap: Ensuring Effective Healthcare Leadership Requires Inclusion of Women at the Top  [PDF]
Kathryn J. McDonagh, Paula Bobrowski, Mary Ann Keogh Hoss, Nancy M. Paris, Margaret Schulte
Open Journal of Leadership (OJL) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojl.2014.32003
Abstract:

This paper argues that successful transformation of the healthcare system requires inclusion of women at the top. Women are missing in top leadership roles in healthcare at a time when the US healthcare system faces daunting challenges. There is a documented need for diverse leadership teams with transformational leadership skills to successfully lead organizations, yet women who comprise three fourths of the healthcare workforce are sparsely represented in board rooms and in the senior executive suite. Through a review the literature the authors explain why this leadership gap persists and recommend strategies to increase gender diversity in leadership ranks of the healthcare industry. Studies from other business sectors are also examined for application in healthcare. A lack of focus on female career development and succession planning, often based on persistent stereotypes about women leaders is a major deterrent to advancing women in top leadership positions. A compelling case is made for immediate remediation of this issue and implementing strategies to fill the leadership gap with talented women leaders. There is a demand to increase the number of women in top leadership positions in healthcare to assist in overcoming the current crises facing the industry.

Educational Leadership for E-Learning in the Healthcare Workplace  [cached]
Dorothy (Willy) Fahlman
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning , 2012,
Abstract: Effective educational leadership can make a difference in the resolution of complex issues that impact today’s demand-driven educational marketplace. The ongoing professional and skill development needs of human health resources may be best managed through distributed strategic leadership blended with servant leadership. Together these two approaches may offer the critical bridge for effective educational leadership for e-learning within the healthcare workplace.
What Makes an “Effective” Leader: The Application of Leadership  [cached]
Charles E. Notar,Carol S. Uline,Charlotte King Eady
International Education Studies , 2008, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v1n3p25
Abstract: This article is based on the premise that leadership is leadership, whatever the profession. A number of “leaders” from various enterprises are discussed to determine the basic tenets of leadership. The nine tenets of leadership are: (1) Think and Act Strategically. (2) Understand and Demonstrate the Elements of Teams and Teamwork. (3) Master Small Group Decision Making. (4) Clearly Define Roles and Relationships. (5) Establish and Abide by a Leader-Subordinate Partnership. (6) Implement Systematic Evaluation of Policy. (7) Allocate Leader Time/Energy Appropriately. (8) Set Clear Rules and Procedures for Meetings.(9) Learn and Develop Continuously as a Leader.
A Critical Review of Leadership Research Development  [cached]
Jun Liu,Xiaoyu Liu
International Journal of Business and Management , 2009,
Abstract: Leadership research has gone through several phases of development in the past 80 years or so. The paper identifies the major theories in each phase, and investigates the strengths and weaknesses of the research. Among those theories, transformational/charismatic leadership and leader-member exchange (LMX) are heavily discussed. The paper also discusses the future trend of research in leadership areas.
A triad of pastoral leadership for congregational health and well-being: Leader, manager and servant in a shared and equipping ministry
MJ Manala
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2010,
Abstract: That ministry is to be given back to the laity is a laudable proposition. However, the level of development in many township and village communities is still such that a strong leadership and management facilitation role is demanded of the pastor. In such contexts, the pastor is also the only one who is always available for church tasks. The point of departure of this article was that the pastor is primarily a facilitator who assumes the tasks of a leader, a manager and a servant. The Trinitarian office of Christ is taken as model. Christian leadership, as discussed from a systems perspective, is seen as enabling rather than hegemonic. The pastor fulfils the seven leadership functions in order to equip the saints for their Christian service. Church management is redefined as a process which takes place in meaningful collaboration with others, over against the objectification found in conventional definitions which focus on ‘getting things done through people’. This article discussed servant leadership and service provision as the central purpose of Christian leadership.
A triad of pastoral leadership for congregational health and well-being: Leader, manager and servant in a shared and equipping ministry  [cached]
Matsobane J. Manala
HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/hts.v66i2.875
Abstract: That ministry is to be given back to the laity is a laudable proposition. However, the level of development in many township and village communities is still such that a strong leadership and management facilitation role is demanded of the pastor. In such contexts, the pastor is also the only one who is always available for church tasks. The point of departure of this article was that the pastor is primarily a facilitator who assumes the tasks of a leader, a manager and a servant. The Trinitarian office of Christ is taken as model. Christian leadership, as discussed from a systems perspective, is seen as enabling rather than hegemonic. The pastor fulfils the seven leadership functions in order to equip the saints for their Christian service. Church management is redefined as a process which takes place in meaningful collaboration with others, over against the objectification found in conventional definitions which focus on ‘getting things done through people’. This article discussed servant leadership and service provision as the central purpose of Christian leadership. How to cite this article: Manala, M.J., 2010, ‘A triad of pastoral leadership for congregational health and well-being: Leader, manager and servant in a shared and equipping ministry’, HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies 66(2), Art. #875, 6 pages. DOI: 10.4102/hts.v66i2.875
Exemplary leadership and exemplary teams: Unleashing future defence leadership potential  [cached]
Solly Mollo
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies , 2012, DOI: 10.5787/31-1-148
Abstract: A perusal of leadership literature reflects the relatively vast amount of readily available information about leader development, all lumped under the generic heading of 'leadership training.' Yet, according to the present leadership-training debate, training is but one aspect of leader development. And from this we may deduce that much important work remains to be done on leader-development issues. Particularly so, as leader development is the imperative ingredient if organisations are to maximise the performance of human beings in pursuit of organisational goals.
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