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Study of Anxiety and Style Control Parenting
Fereshteh Ghaljaei,Behzad Narouie,Mahin Naderifar,Mohammad Ghasemi-Rad,Hamideh Hanafi-Bojd
Research Journal of Biological Sciences , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjbsci.2012.234.237
Abstract: Strong, desirable and mutual relationship between parents and child is necessary so that nurses can achieve their duties and delivery of care to the child. This relationship should be identified in context of family (Style control parenting) in order for the nurses to maintain those parts of family relationship related to nursing duties. Anyhow, the actions should be planned in a manner that be well-adjusted with children' morale and help to decrease child's anxiety. The present descriptive correlation study aims to determine the relationship of behavioral models of parent with their children s anxiety (370 students in age 13-15) in 10 governmental girl guidance schools, Dist. 6 of Tehran city. The tools were questionnaires planned for students and parents consisting demographic characteristics, physiologic symptoms of anxiety, Spiel Berger Anxiety Test for parents and Reynolds and Richmond Anxiety Tests for students. The amount of anxiety among these groups was analyzed using Chi-square Test and Fisher Exact Test in SPSS statistical software. Results showed that the amount of anxiety among students was 33% with the most anxiety (92%) among adolescents who evaluated their parents' behavior as autocratic (p = 0.001) and the least anxiety (7.6%) in adolescents who had democratic parents (p = 0.003). These findings shows that there is statistically significant relationship between anxiety and style control parenting (p<0.05), (df = 2). Style control parenting plays an important role in children s anxiety, therefore health care providers can be effective in decreasing children' anxiety by teaching style control parenting.
Commentary: Emotional Problems and Depression among Children and Adolescents in Today’s Society  [PDF]
Clarissa Agee Shavers
Open Journal of Depression (OJD) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojd.2014.32012
Abstract: Clinical diagnoses of emotional problems and depression are serious global health care issues among children and adolescents in today’s society. Global estimates of the prevalence of childhood and adolescent emotional problems and depression have been found to be growing worldwide. Anxiety and mood disorders are very common emotional problems or disorders identified among this population. Similarly, major depressive disorder (MDD) is now considered one of the most common diagnoses among children and adolescents with the first depressive episode generally identified in late childhood or early adolescence. Likewise, co-morbid disorders including emotional problems have been found to significantly impact the psycho-social-emotional and mental health status of children and adolescents. Routine screening and assessment for emotional problems and depression among children and adolescents has been recommended for Health Care Providers (HCP’s) in clinical settings. However, many children and adolescents are not routinely screened and unfortunately this results in missed or under-diagnosing. For these reasons, raising the awareness of HCP’s in clinical practice regarding these issues may significantly improve routine screening, early detection, and treatment efforts among children and adolescents. A synopsis of the current literature including implications for clinical practice, research, and evidence-based intervention is discussed.
Infantile spasms (West syndrome): update and resources for pediatricians and providers to share with parents
James W Wheless, Patricia A Gibson, Kari Rosbeck, Maria Hardin, Christine O’Dell, Vicky Whittemore, John M Pellock
BMC Pediatrics , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2431-12-108
Abstract: Treatment guidelines, consensus reports, and original research studies are reviewed to provide an update regarding the diagnosis and treatment of infants with IS. Web sites were searched for educational and supportive resource content relevant to providers and families of patients with IS.Early detection of IS and pediatrician referral to a pediatric neurologist for further evaluation and initiation of treatment may improve prognosis. Family education and the establishment of a multidisciplinary continuum of care are important components of care for the majority of patients with IS. The focus of the continuum of care varies across diagnosis, initiation of treatment, and short- and long-term needs. Several on-line educational and supportive resources for families and caregivers of patients with IS were identified.Given the possibility of poor developmental outcomes in IS, including the emergence of other seizure disorders and cognitive and developmental problems, early recognition, referral, and treatment of IS are important for optimal patient outcomes. Dissemination of and access to educational and supportive resources for families and caregivers across the lifespan of the child with IS is an urgent need. Pediatric health care providers are well positioned to address these needs.Infantile spasms (IS; West syndrome) is a severe form of epilepsy of early infancy [1]. Although IS was first described over 160?years ago [1], its diagnosis, evaluation, and management continue to pose many challenges to health care professionals and affected families. Educating pediatricians and general pediatric health care providers about IS may be especially important as a recent IS working group (ISWG) of pediatric neurologists reviewed the literature and determined that early recognition of IS and prompt treatment are mandatory and may improve developmental and cognitive outcomes in some patients [2]. IS presents with myoclonic-tonic seizures (spasms) that may be characterized by fle
Shared medical appointments for children and adolescents with type I diabetes: perspectives and experiences of patients, parents, and health care providers
Mejino A,Noordman J,van Dulmen S
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics , 2012,
Abstract: Arlene Mejino,1 Janneke Noordman,1 Sandra van Dulmen1–31Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Primary and Community Care, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 3Department of Health Science, Buskerud University College, Drammen, NorwayAims: This study examined the perspectives and experiences of patients, parents, and health care providers with shared medical appointments (SMAs) for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Specifically studied were reasons to attend SMAs, perceived differences between SMAs and individual medical appointments, patient-valued health care aspects, and providers' performance.Methods: Fifty-two patients, 8 parents, and 36 health care providers participated. Perspectives on SMAs were assessed with questionnaires and an online focus group. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: Health care providers had work-related reasons to conduct SMAs. Patients and parents primarily valued the presence of other patients during SMAs. According to health care providers and patients, a higher or similar amount of information was discussed during SMAs as opposed to individual appointments, respectively. SMAs did contain more discussion about lifestyle. Most consultation aspects considered important by the patients were performed by their health care providers. Patient satisfaction with SMAs did tend to decrease after 3 months. Parents were somewhat more critical about SMAs.Conclusions: Health care providers, patients, and parents were generally positive about SMAs. Future studies should examine the impact of the presence of parents and different health care providers during SMAs, and that of differences in patient age, type of insulin treatment, and disease-related problems.Keywords: child, adolescent, diabetes mellitus type 1, pediatrics, shared medical appointment
Handling the transition of adolescents with diabetes: participant observations and interviews with care providers in paediatric and adult diabetes outpatient clinics  [cached]
Carina Sparud Lundin,Ella Danielson,Ingbritt ?hrn
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2007,
Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how care providers handle the transition process from paediatric to adult diabetes outpatient clinic and to describe their perception of adolescents' needs during this process. Methods: Participant observations of patient visits to nurses and physicians and 10 semi-structured interviews with care providers in two paediatric and two adult clinics in Sweden were carried out. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method developed in the grounded theory tradition. Results: The integrated framework developed in the analysis consists of subcategories, process categories and a core phenomenon. The preparation phase showed in this study that preparing transition requires modified strategies. The transition phase implied transferring responsibility and changing care relations while the evaluation phase revealed that care providers are creating mutual understanding through appraisal. All categories are related to the generated core phenomenon: enabling integration through professional meetings. The way care providers construct meeting arenas has a crucial impact on the possibility to bridge uncertainty, insufficient knowledge, routines and strategies. Conclusions: The way participating clinics handle transition greatly influences the process. Professional meetings appeared to be of vital importance to enable the building of bridges between paediatric and adult diabetes care in this study.
Shared medical appointments for children and adolescents with type I diabetes: perspectives and experiences of patients, parents, and health care providers
Mejino A, Noordman J, van Dulmen S
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S32417
Abstract: red medical appointments for children and adolescents with type I diabetes: perspectives and experiences of patients, parents, and health care providers Original Research (1590) Total Article Views Authors: Mejino A, Noordman J, van Dulmen S Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 75 - 83 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S32417 Received: 30 March 2012 Accepted: 04 May 2012 Published: 15 June 2012 Arlene Mejino,1 Janneke Noordman,1 Sandra van Dulmen1–3 1Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Primary and Community Care, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 3Department of Health Science, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway Aims: This study examined the perspectives and experiences of patients, parents, and health care providers with shared medical appointments (SMAs) for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Specifically studied were reasons to attend SMAs, perceived differences between SMAs and individual medical appointments, patient-valued health care aspects, and providers' performance. Methods: Fifty-two patients, 8 parents, and 36 health care providers participated. Perspectives on SMAs were assessed with questionnaires and an online focus group. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Health care providers had work-related reasons to conduct SMAs. Patients and parents primarily valued the presence of other patients during SMAs. According to health care providers and patients, a higher or similar amount of information was discussed during SMAs as opposed to individual appointments, respectively. SMAs did contain more discussion about lifestyle. Most consultation aspects considered important by the patients were performed by their health care providers. Patient satisfaction with SMAs did tend to decrease after 3 months. Parents were somewhat more critical about SMAs. Conclusions: Health care providers, patients, and parents were generally positive about SMAs. Future studies should examine the impact of the presence of parents and different health care providers during SMAs, and that of differences in patient age, type of insulin treatment, and disease-related problems.
Research into the Empathic Skills and the Anxiety Level of Adolescents
A. K. Akyol
Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: In this research, it was aimed to determine the empathic skills and the anxiety levels of adolescents and to find out whether gender caused differences in empathic skills and anxiety levels. A total of 388 adolescents attending second-year at high schools participated in the study. A "General Information Form" was used to obtain some information about the adolescents, the Empathetic Skills Scale-Form B was used to determine their empathic skills and the "State and Trait Anxiety Inventory" was used to assess their anxiety level. The data were tested analyzed by means of SPSS. The findings were tested by a t-test for independent samples and Pearson Correlation Coefficients. Statistical differences were set at p< 0.05. The results revealed that there is a significant differences in the trait anxiety levels of adolescents by gender (p< 0.05), however; there is no significant differences among gender and empathic skills and the state anxiety levels of adolescents (p>0.05). Additionally, the research was, also, cited that there is no meaningful correlation among the empathic skills and the state and trait anxiety levels of adolescents.
Attachment patterns and anxiety in adolescents suffering from mixed disorders of conduct and emotions [Wzory przywi zania i l k u adolescentów z diagnoz zaburzeń zachowania i emocji]  [PDF]
Iniewicz, Grzegorz,Dziekan, Karolina,Wi?niewska, Dominika,Czuszkiewicz, Agnieszka
Psychiatria Polska , 2011,
Abstract: Aim. The paper presents results of research concerning attachment patterns and anxiety in adolescents suffering from mixed disorders of conduct and emotions.Method. Both clinical and control group completed the Parental Bonding Instrument and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The first questionnaire measures parental style as perceived by the child, it consists of two scales: care and control. The second one the temporary condition of “state anxiety” and the more general and long-standing quality of “trait anxiety”.Results. The study revealed that adolescents from the clinical group perceive their parents as less protective than the control. Adolescents from the clinical group revealed also a higher level of anxiety, both as a state and as a trait.Conclusions. The basic conclusion is that there are differences between groups in family functioning – adolescents from the clinical group received less protection from parents, which may influence their behaviours aimed at providing them more safety.
ANXIETY IN ADOLESCENTS & SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS OF FAMILY  [PDF]
CHETANA V.DONGLIKAR
Indian Streams Research Journal , 2013,
Abstract: To study the role of Socio-Economic factors in increasing anxiety level of adolescents, a study was conducted among the adolescents of Nanded district With an Objective – “To study the Role of Socio-Economic Factors of Family in Arousing Anxiety of Adolescents.” Sample was selected by Stratified Random Sampling method among 265 girls and 262 boys from 16 to 18 years age group belonging to three income groups. Assessment of anxiety level in adolescents was carried out with the help I.P.A.T. Anxiety scale, by Samuel.E.Krug. For the convenience of adolescents Hindi version of this test was used revised by Dr.S.D.Kapoor. The obtained data was examined with the help of scoring key and was statistically co-related with socio-economic factors of adolescents. Results indicate that, 1)Family income was significantly co-related with 5% level in boys with apprehension (0.249**) and tension (0.256**) and with 1% level with same norms i.e. apprehension (0511*) and tension (0.521*) in girls.2) Family income was also significantly co-related with low self control in boys (0274*) and girls (0.277*) with1% level.3) Specially in boys it was found that father's education was significantly co-related with apprehension (0.255*) at 1% level.4) When anxiety norms of both girls and boys were studied through the test of variance i.e. one way ANOVA no significant difference was found. Scores for the norms like emotional instability, apprehension and tension were found with more percent in boys than girls. Whereas scores of indirect factors related to anxiety were found more in girls along with low self control and suspicion.
What are the Mental Health Needs of Adolescents in Rural South Australia? The Perceptions of Human Service Providers  [PDF]
Ms Marijeta Kurtin,Dr Christopher Barton,Professor Anthony Winefield,Dr Jane Edwards
Australasian Medical Journal , 2009,
Abstract: BACKGROUND:Up to 20% of Australian adolescents experience the burden of having a mental health problem. Priorresearch has suggested that inhabitants of rural areas are at particular risk of mental healthmorbidity due to their location. The current study sought to investigate how ‘rurality’ influences themental health of adolescents in rural South Australia, and to explore the perceptions of the mentalhealth needs of adolescents as described by service providers in rural South Australia.METHODS:Four focus group discussions and 14 interviews were conducted with 38 human (allied health) serviceproviders in the Eyre Peninsula, Spencer Gulf, Limestone Coast and Greater Green Triangle regions ofSouth Australia. Semi-structured telephone interviews were also conducted with three Victorianhuman service providers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify emergentthemes.RESULTS:Ninety codes were developed and subsequently categorised into five major themes: Community andSociety Factors; Youth Issues, Indigeneity; Service Delivery and Utilisation; and Occupational Factors.Significant gaps in mental health service delivery were identified. Better utilisation of currentresources was identified as a greater concern than the absence of resources per se.CONCLUSIONS:This study provided a unique opportunity for rural allied and primary health care service providers todiscuss adolescent mental health issues in their communities and as part of their work. The datagenerated by these discussions identified areas where practice could be improved.
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