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Ants Wax Manic: A Translation in Orature  [PDF]
Wanberg, Kyle
452o F : Revista de Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada , 2012,
Abstract: In this study I examine a translation of the oral Ant Songs from ‘Akimel ‘O‘odham (Pima) to English, emphasizing the way obstacles to translation transfigure how they are rendered as literary works. An analysis of their performance, language, cultural codes, and orality illuminate a highly ambiguous territory. The study of this and other translations of orature, including the difficulties they give rise to, can enrich our understanding of literature as well as translation.
English Orature, English Literature: the Case of Charms
Jonathan Roper
Folklore : Electronic Journal of Folklore , 2003,
Abstract: Traditional charms are a part of English orature; charms in literature are a part of English literature. This simple distinction does not, however, tell the whole story: charms, as is well known, are sometimes written down, rather than verbalized, in order to function as talismans; charms, no matter how traditionary, can feature motifs more commonly found in literature; and the transmission of charms may involve a written as well as an oral dimension (the most obvious example of this being the existence of spellbooks). On the other hand, charms in literature are not always purely literary: they may have a relationship with traditional verbal charms. At the very least, charms presumably existed in real life before they appeared in literature. This paper, which is not a full survey of charms in English literature, will examine some occurrences of supposed charms in literary texts and compare and contrast these items with the generic characteristics of the genuine article.
Cultural Roots for Computing:The Case of African Diasporic Orature and Computational Narrative in the GRIOT System  [cached]
D. Fox Harrell
Fibreculture Journal , 2008,
Abstract: Cultural practices and values are implicitly built into all computational systems. However, it is not common to develop systems with explicit critical engagement with, and foundations in, cultural practices and values aside from those traditionally privileged in discourse surrounding computing practices. I assert that engaging commonly excluded cultural values and practices can potentially spur computational innovation, and can invigorate expressive computational production. In particular, diverse ways of representing and manipulating semantic content and distinctive relationships between humans and our (digital) artifacts can form the basis for new technical and expressive computing practices. This idea is developed using the example of the GRIOT system. GRIOT is a platform for implementing interactive and generative computational narratives. Its underlying theoretical bases are in algebraic semantics from computer science, cognitive linguistics, and semiotics. Initial systems built in GRIOT enable generation of poetry in response to user input. GRIOT is deeply informed by African diasporic traditions of orature and socio-cultural engagement.
Orature and Morpholexical Deconstruction as Lexicographic Archaeological Sites: Some Implications for Dictionaries of African Languages1
Francis Matambirofa
Lexikos , 2011, DOI: 10.5788/11--838
Abstract: : This article takes a multidisciplinary approach to African lexicographic practice. It has as its primary premise the assumption that without words there can be no dictionaries to compile and discuss. Owing to this fact, the article focuses on a specific strategy for collecting words which belong in a special category of their own, namely archaic or obsolete words. Such words are important because of the need to mark them as such in any general purpose dictionary. Most, if not all dictionaries of African languages seem not to have this category, giving the misleading impression that there are no such words in African languages. Apart from digging up archaic or what we have also referred to as artefact words, the article also argues that the words have a substantial and intrinsic etymological value. Thus they can be used in specialised etymological dictionaries of African languages or even in standard general dictionaries. The multidisciplinary aspect resides in the methodology proposed for the recovery of archaic words. It is considered necessary that disciplines such as oral literature, oral history, historical linguistics and to a limited extent theoretical linguistics and computational linguistics, and, symbolically, archaeology and lexicography itself, be brought to bear on the subject of inquiry. The article is also an attempt at working out a method which African lexicographers can employ as an instrument to dig up artefact words for etymological and other such purposes. Hopefully the method can be refined further. Keywords: ORATURE, MORPHOLEXICAL, DECONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES, LEXICOGRAPHY, AFRICAN LANGUAGES, DICTIONARIES, DIACHRONIC, SYNCHRONIC, HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS, PROVERBS, RIDDLES, IDIOMS, ORAL TRADITIONS, MNEMONIC, ETYMOLOGY, ARCHAIC, SHONA, DEVERBATIVE NOUNS, VERB ROOT, SEMANTIC, ARTEFACT WORDS Opsomming: Mondelinge literatuur en morfoleksikale dekonstruksie as leksikografiese argeologiese terreine: 'n Aantal implikasies vir woordeboeke van Afrikatale. Hierdie artikel het 'n multidissiplin?re benadering tot die leksikografiese praktyk in Afrikatale. Dit het as prim?re uitgangspunt die veronderstelling dat dit sonder woorde onmoontlik is om woordeboeke op te stel en te bespreek. Op grond van hierdie feit fokus die artikel op 'n spesifieke strategie vir die versameling van woorde wat tot 'n kategorie van hul eie behoort, naamlik arga?ese of verouderde woorde. Sulke woorde is belangrik vanwe? die noodsaaklikheid om hulle as sulks te merk in enige woordeboek vir algemene gebruik. Die meeste, indien nie alle woordeboek
Dichter und Demiurg der Frauen Poet and Demiurge of Women  [cached]
Sabine Eickenrodt
querelles-net , 2000,
Abstract: Die Literaturwissenschaftlerin Elsbeth Dangel-Pelloquin untersucht Jean Pauls poetische Geschlechter-Werkstatt unter den Aspekten der empfindsamen Liebe im Hesperus, der Ehe im Siebenk s und der Elternschaft in der Erziehungsschrift Levana. Ihr Interesse gilt den erz hlerischen Repr sentationen von Weiblichkeit bei Jean Paul, denen mit dieser Studie erstmals eine Monographie gewidmet wird. Elsbeth Dangel-Pelloquin analyses the poetic workshop of gender seen from the angle of sentimental love in the novel of Hesperus, of marriage in Siebenk s and of parenthood in the educational text Levana. The author is specially interested in Jean Paul’s narrative femal representations. It is for the first time that a study has been dedicated to this problem.
Editorial Niger: Emerging literature and modern orature – voicing identity
Antoinette Tidjani Alou
Tydskrif vir letterkunde , 2005,
Abstract:
Sustaining the Heritage: Assessing the Aesthetics of Verbal Symbolisation and Signifaction in Idanre Orature  [PDF]
N. Akingbe,C.B. Ogunyemi,A. Akinkugbe
Venets : The Belogradchik Journal for Local History, Cultural Heritage and Folk Studies , 2012,
Abstract: This study shows how oral poetry permeates the culture and activities of Africans. In almost all African communities, there are poetic expressions such that poems are sung to express mother/father/child’s emotional state for and at every occasion. These include marriage, age grade celebration, departure or separation from one another, death, farming, hunting, trading and religious celebrations. The paper x-rays cultural configuration with the application of cultural theory to delineate societal transformation.
The archetipical image of the bird-demiurge in mythological concepts of finno-ugrs of volga region: the some anthropocosmic aspects
Doroshin B. A.
Sociosfera , 2010,
Abstract: Ornithomorphic mythological characters, connected with process of cosmogony and an archetype of Great Mother in mythological concepts of people of the Volga region are considered in this article. In semantic structure of their images the aspects locating concepts of these people about harmonious unity of the person and the nature come to light.
Orature and morpholexical deconstruction as lexicographic archaeological sites: some implications for dictionaries of African languages
F Matambirofa
Lexikos , 2001,
Abstract: This article takes a multidisciplinary approach to African lexicographic practice. It has as its primary premise the assumption that without words there can be no dictionaries to compile and discuss. Owing to this fact, the article focuses on a specific strategy for collecting words which belong in a special category of their own, namely archaic or obsolete words. Such words are important because of the need to mark them as such in any general purpose dictionary. Most, if not all dictionaries of African languages seem not to have this category, giving the misleading impression that there are no such words in African languages. Apart from digging up archaic or what we have also referred to as artefact words, the article also argues that the words have a substantial and intrinsic etymological value. Thus they can be used in specialised etymological dictionaries of African languages or even in standard general dictionaries. The multidisciplinary aspect resides in the methodology proposed for the recovery of archaic words. It is considered necessary that disciplines such as oral literature, oral history, historical linguistics and to a limited extent theoretical linguistics and computational linguistics, and, symbolically, archaeology and lexicography itself, be brought to bear on the subject of inquiry. The article is also an attempt at working out a method which African lexicographers can employ as an instrument to dig up artefact words for etymological and other such purposes. Hopefully the method can be refined further.
A intera??o naturante entre o demiurgo e o mundo, a quest?o dos "dois tipos de matéria" e a natureza da "implanta??o" da alma no corpo
Fernandes, Edrisi;
Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-512X2010000200015
Abstract: in his commentary on the timaeus proclus says that in some occasions plato speaks of a model (from which the world is created) that is identical to the demiurge while in other occasions he suggests that the model is distinct from the demiurge. here, identity and difference refer to the similarity with or dissimilarity from the intelligible one, identified with eternity (stability; fixedness). however, plato also speaks in the timaeus that the cosmos is pretty and its constructor (the demiurge) is good inasmuch as he fixed his sight in the perpetual model. if we ask what is produced when the demiurge fixed his sight in a model that it is not identical to himself, we find the reply in the timaeus: envy, defects, disorder, limitation regarding intelligence and the soul, incompleteness, ugliness, and imperfection. plotinus, on his turn, mentions (enneads, ii.4) the existence of two types of matter, intelligible and sensible. the intelligible or divine matter is equivalent to the "indefinite dyad", identified with the procession of the no?s. for plotinus, though the intelligible matter is eternal and invariant, its archê is constituted by difference and movement - conditions that prepare the naturation of sensible matter. for proclus, the soul, an unfolding of the no?s, mediates between the intellect, intelligible matter and sensible matter. many interpreters seem to have understood inteligible matter as the matter of the soul, and to explain the interaction between the intelligible and the sensible many theories have appeared regarding the constitution of intelligible matter and about the nature of the "vehicle" or "vehicles" that would be associated with the soul's "descent" and incarnation.
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