oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
A Case of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Oculomotor Nerve Palsy
?zlem Kay?m YILDIZ,Hatice SE?MEN,Ertu?rul BOLAYIR,Ahmet Suat TOPAKTA?
Journal of Neurological Sciences , 2009,
Abstract: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus may rarely be complicated with ocular motor nerve palsies. The exact mechanism of the palsies is unclear. The present report describes a case of herpes zoster ophthalmicus complicated with an oculomotor nerve palsy. A 85-year-old woman who had suffered from right herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed ipsilateral oculomotor nerve involvement 12 days later. The patient was treated with acyclovir and prednisolone. We report the case with a brief review of the ophthalmoplegia associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus.
Herpes zoster ophthalmicus with total ophthalmoplegia
Talwar S,Srivastava V
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1990,
Abstract: A case of unilateral herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is reported with ipsilateral involvement of III, IV and VI cranial nerves which led to extra ocular muscles palsy presenting as total ophthalmopegia along with ptosis, cycloplegia and dilated non reactive pupil.
Ocular manifestations in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus  [PDF]
LR Puri,GB Shrestha,DN Shah,M Chaudhary,A Thakar
Nepalese Journal of Ophthalmology , 2011, DOI: 10.3126/nepjoph.v3i2.5271
Abstract: Background: Ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) may lead to substantial visual disability, severe post-herpetic neuralgia and rarely fatal cerebral complications. Aim : To identify the pattern of ocular manifestation in herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Materials and methods : A cross-sectional descriptive study was under taken including the clinically diagnosed cases of HZO. All of them underwent a complete ophthalmological evaluation. Results: Sixty-eight cases of HZO were examined, of which 37 (54.4 %) were male and 31 (45.6%) female. The mean age was 48.7 ± 18.5 years. Most of the patients (64.7 %) were above the age of 40 years. 77.94 % of the patients had some form of ocular involvement. Pain (77.9 %) was the commonest ocular complaint. In young patients less than 35 years, HIV was the most common risk factor (19.3 %).Visual status was good in the majority (73.5 %) of patients at presentation. Lid and adnexal findings (45.8 %) were most common ocular involvement followed by conjunctivitis (41.1 %). Corneal complication was seen in 38.2 % of cases, uveitis in 19.1 % and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and secondary glaucoma each in 5.8 %. Conclusion : Eyelid and ocular adnexal involvement is most commonly found in patients with herpes zoster ophthalmicus followed by corneal complication and uveitis. There needs to be awareness of ocular involvement, which can be sight threatening, among the HZO patients and other medical departments and an increased emphasis on regular ophthalmic examination. Key words: herpes virus, herpes zoster, conjunctivitis, keratitis DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/nepjoph.v3i2.5271 Nepal J Ophthalmol 2011; 3(2): 165-171
Orbital Apex Syndrome in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus
Hatice Arda,Ertugrul Mirza,Koray Gumus,Ayse Oner,Sarper Karakucuk,Ender S rakaya
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/854503
Abstract: Orbital apex syndrome is a rare manifestation of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus. Herein we report on a case of orbital apex syndrome secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus. A 75 year-old male complained of vision loss, conjunctival hyperemia and proptosis on the left eye, was referred to our clinic. Visual acuity was 5/10 Snellen lines and he had conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis, minimal nuclear cataract and proptosis on the left eye. A diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was demonstrated firstly. The patient received oral and topical corticosteroids, antiinflammatory and antibiotic agents. On day 2, vesiculopustular lesions were observed, Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus was diagnosed and corticosteroid treatment stopped, oral acyclovir treatment initiated. Two days later, total ophthalmoplegia, ptosis and significant visual loss were observed on the left. The diagnosis of orbital apex syndrome was considered and the patient commenced on an intravenous acyclovir treatment. After the improvement of acute symptoms, a tapering dose of oral cortisone treatment initiated to accelarate the recovery of ophthalmoplegia. At 5-month follow-up, ptosis and ocular motility showed improvement. VA did not significantly improve because of cataract and choroidal detachment on the left. We conclude that ophthalmoplegia secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus responds favourably to intravenous acyclovir and steroids.
Orbital Apex Syndrome in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus  [PDF]
Hatice Arda,Ertugrul Mirza,Koray Gumus,Ayse Oner,Sarper Karakucuk,Ender S?rakaya
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/854503
Abstract: Orbital apex syndrome is a rare manifestation of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus. Herein we report on a case of orbital apex syndrome secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus. A 75 year-old male complained of vision loss, conjunctival hyperemia and proptosis on the left eye, was referred to our clinic. Visual acuity was 5/10 Snellen lines and he had conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis, minimal nuclear cataract and proptosis on the left eye. A diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was demonstrated firstly. The patient received oral and topical corticosteroids, antiinflammatory and antibiotic agents. On day 2, vesiculopustular lesions were observed, Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus was diagnosed and corticosteroid treatment stopped, oral acyclovir treatment initiated. Two days later, total ophthalmoplegia, ptosis and significant visual loss were observed on the left. The diagnosis of orbital apex syndrome was considered and the patient commenced on an intravenous acyclovir treatment. After the improvement of acute symptoms, a tapering dose of oral cortisone treatment initiated to accelarate the recovery of ophthalmoplegia. At 5-month follow-up, ptosis and ocular motility showed improvement. VA did not significantly improve because of cataract and choroidal detachment on the left. We conclude that ophthalmoplegia secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus responds favourably to intravenous acyclovir and steroids. 1. Introduction Herpes zoster is a localized disease characterised by unilateral radicular pain and a vesicular eruption caused by varicella zoster virus which is a human neurotropic DNA virus [1, 2]. Orbital involvement with HZO includes keratoconjunctivitis, anterior uveitis, acute retinal necrosis, acute phthisis bulbi, central retinal artery occlusion, optic neuritis, orbital pseudotumor, and partial or complete paralysis of ocular motility [3–6]. The extraocular muscle palsies occur in 3.5–10.1% of patients with ophthalmic zoster; these are transient, self-limited, and usually seen in the elderly [4, 5, 7, 8]. The orbital apex syndrome (OAS) is defined by the association of visual loss, ophthalmoplegia, blepharoptosis, proptosis, and anesthesia of the upper eyelid and forehead. It is a rare manifestation of HZO [9]. In this study we report on a case of orbital apex syndrome secondary to HZO. 2. Case Report A 75-year-old male referred to the eye clinic of Erciyes University Medical Faculty with the complaint of vision loss and conjunctival hyperemia of the left eye. He had a history of trauma to his left eye four days ago. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the
Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus  [cached]
Mustafa Burak Sayhan,Eylem Sezenler,?smail Hakk? Nalbur,G?k?e Ya?c?
Akademik Acil T?p Olgu Sunumlar? Dergisi (AKATOS) , 2012,
Abstract: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common diagnosis in the emergency department, but herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a rare form of shingles that typically presents with prodromal symptoms followed by a rash distributed along the V1-V2 dermatomes. Classically, HZO begins with flu-like symptoms including fever, myalgia and malaise for approximately one week. In the current case, we describe a woman who presented to our medical center with a headache and rash on the right forehead. HZO is a potentially serious reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. The differential diagnosis of HZO is an important task for emergency physicians because of its rapid onset and severity.
Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus in HIV/AIDS
Boateng Wiafe MD MSc
Community Eye Health Journal , 2003,
Abstract: Herpes zoster is a common infection caused by the human herpes virus 3, the same virus that causes chickenpox. It is a member of herpes viridae, the same family as the herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when a latent varicella zoster virus in the trigeminal ganglia involving the ophthalmic division of the nerve is reactivated. Of the three divisions of the fifth cranial nerve, the ophthalmic is involved 20 times more frequently than the other divisions.
Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Oculomotor Nerve Palsy
Viroj WIWANITKIT
Journal of Neurological Sciences , 2010,
Abstract: Editor, I read the recent publication on a case of herpes zoster ophthalmicus with oculomotor nerve palsy by Yildiz et al with a great interest(4). As Yildiz et al noted, this is a rare neurological complication of herpes zoster(4). Haargaard et al proposed that “Central nervous system involvement after varicella zoster virus infection is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening, complication. (2)” This complication is usually acute(1) and the early antiviral treatment is not proved useful on the prevention(3). There is still no present recommended effective mean for prevention and treatment of this condition. Further research to assess the pathogenesis and natural history of oculomotor nerve palsy in herpes zoster ophthalmicus is recommended.
An Acute Case of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus with Ophthalmoplegia
Wasim Hakim,Rosalie Sherman,Tamer Rezk,Kanwar Pannu
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/953910
Abstract: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) with oculomotor nerve involvement is rare, even rarer as an acute presentation rather than sequelae of HZO. In this paper we present a case of cutaneous HZO in which our patient's initial presentation was one of complete ophthalmoplegia.
Orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus  [cached]
Kurimoto T,Tonari M,Ishizaki N,Monta M
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2011,
Abstract: Takuji Kurimoto1, Masahiro Tonari1, Norihiko Ishizaki1, Mitsuhiro Monta2, Saori Hirata2, Hidehiro Oku1, Jun Sugasawa1, Tsunehiko Ikeda11Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Shitennoji Hospital, Osaka, JapanAbstract: We report our findings for a patient with orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Our patient was initially admitted to a neighborhood hospital because of nausea and loss of appetite of 10 days' duration. The day after hospitalization, she developed skin vesicles along the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with severe lid swelling and conjunctival injection. On suspicion of meningoencephalitis caused by varicella zoster virus, antiviral therapy with vidarabine and betamethasone was started. Seventeen days later, complete ptosis and ophthalmoplegia developed in the right eye. The light reflex in the right eye was absent and anisocoria was present, with the right pupil larger than the left. Fat-suppressed enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance images showed high intensity areas in the muscle cone, cavernous sinus, and orbital optic nerve sheath. Our patient was diagnosed with orbital apex syndrome, and because of skin vesicles in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, the orbital apex syndrome was considered to be caused by herpes zoster ophthalmicus. After the patient was transferred to our hospital, prednisolone 60 mg and vidarabine antiviral therapy was started, and fever and headaches disappeared five days later. The ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis, but not the anisocoria, gradually resolved during tapering of oral therapy. From the clinical findings and course, the cause of the orbital apex syndrome was most likely invasion of the orbital apex and cavernous sinus by the herpes virus through the trigeminal nerve ganglia.Keywords: varicella zoster virus, orbital apex syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complete ophthalmoplegia
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.