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Orofacial Cysts at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana  [PDF]
Alexander Acheampong Oti, Peter Donkor, Osei Owusu-Afriyie
Surgical Science (SS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2013.41011
Abstract:

Background: Information about orofacial cysts from African populations is scarce and there are only a few studies available regarding the prevalence of these lesions in the West African sub-region. The purpose of the present study is to determine the distribution and prevalence of all histologically diagnosed orofacial cysts in Kumasi, Ghana. Aim: To determine prevalence, sex, age and anatomic distribution of orofacial cyst seen at the oral and maxillofacial unit in Komfo Anokye Teaching hospital (KATH). Method: This is a retrospective study, which examined histologically diagnosed lesions including orofacial cysts. The study duration was from 1999 to 2010 September inclusive. Results: There were 37 odontogenic cysts constuting 6.5%, of all orofacial lesions. There were 18 non-odontogenic cysts i.e. 3.1% of all lesions diagnosed during the study period. The odontogenic cysts comprised 19 (51.4%) developmental cysts and 18 (48.6%) inflammatory cysts. Male-to-female ratio for the orofacial cysts was 1:1 and the mean age was 36.7 years. Conclusion: There is low prevalence of the odontogenic cysts, which is consistent with findings from other African studies. Although radicular cysts accounted for the majority of orofacial cysts in this study, the prevalence of radicular cysts is low compared to reports from developed countries.

Salivary Gland Tumours at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana  [PDF]
Alexander Acheampong Oti, Peter Donkor, Solomon Obiri-Yeboah, Osei Afriyie-Owusu
Surgical Science (SS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2013.42026
Abstract:

In African studies on salivary gland tumours, there are considerable epidemiological differences in different parts of the continent. There is no study of salivary gland tumours from the second largest hospital in Ghana, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Aim: This study was to look at the prevalence and demographic distribution of salivary gland tumours at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH). Method: Histopathologically diagnosed salivary gland tumours of consecutive patients were evaluated. The study duration was from 1999 to 2010 October. Result: The total number of salivary gland tumours were 121. Male to female ratio was 1.75:1. Out of the total of 34 salivary malignancies seen, male to female ratio was 1.8:1. Malignant tumour was 28.1% while 71.9% were benign. Mean age for malignancy was 53.5 years (SD = 9.7) and that for benign was 35.5 years (SD = 8.2). Conclusion: The commonest benign tumour of the parotid was Pleomorphic adenoma (48.3%) which is consistent with most of the African and western reports. Warthin’s tumour prevalence was higher than most of the studies from Africa.

RELEASE OF TONGUE-TIE IN NEONATES  [PDF]
V. Raveenthiran
Journal of Neonatal Surgery , 2012,
Abstract: Arguably, release of tongue tie is the oldest surgical procedure and it is perhaps older than circumcision. According to the Old Testament, the Lord released the tied tongue of Moses and made him speak well. Tongue-tie is pedantically known as ankyloglossia inferior minor. Simplicity of its treatment has earned this malady several etiological attributions such as difficulty of speech and breast feeding. All over the world, lactation consultants refer neonates for release of tongue tie as they believe it to be the cause of maternal nipple pain.Perhaps this is the only indication of tongue tie release in neonates.
Pregnant women's knowledge of and attitudes to HIV testing at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi
VN Addo
Ghana Medical Journal , 2005,
Abstract: A questionnaire survey on the knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and attitudes to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) in pregnancy of 334 antenatal attendants at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) was conducted. The survey showed that HIV/AIDS is recognized as a life-threatening condition and is mainly acquired through unprotected sexual intercourse with an infected partner, use of unsterile sharp instruments and blood transfusion. Knowledge about mother to child transmission (MTCT) was lacking. The majority of women who had done the test did so as a pre-requisite for church blessing of their marriage. VCT would be acceptable especially when anonymity is ensured and drug treatment is available for mother and child should the pregnant woman test positive for HIV.
Management of Thoracic Impalement Injury in Ghana: A Five-Year Experience at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital  [PDF]
Isaac Okyere, Samuel Gyasi Brenu, Perditer Okyere
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery (WJCS) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/wjcs.2019.99014
Abstract: Impalement injuries are rare and among the most spectacular and dramatic traumatic injuries especially of the chest. The survival of a patient with a thoracic impalement injury can be extremely rare. Herein we present and discuss our successes of the management of 7 rare cases of thoracic impalement injuries over a 5-year period from January 2014 to June 2019 at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi in Ghana. We discuss the presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of the seven cases encountered.
A Six-Year Review of Head and Neck Cancers at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana  [PDF]
Rita Larsen-Reindorf, Osei Owusu-Afriyie, Alexander Oti Acheampong, Isaac Boakye, Baffour Awuah
International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery (IJOHNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ijohns.2014.35050
Abstract: Background: In Ghana, information on the prevalence and pattern of Head and Neck Cancers (HNCA) is scarce. There are few publications based on specific sub-sites of the head and neck, however, literature on the prevalence and pattern of HNCA in general is lacking. The present study aimed to describe the pattern of HNCA among patients seen at the multidisciplinary HNCA clinic of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all consecutive patient records seen at the multidisciplinary clinic from 2004 to 2009. Results: There were 149 males and 103 females giving a male to female ratio of 1.45:1. The age range was 2 - 95 years with a mean of 48.1 years. The commonest type of HNCA in this review is cancers of the oral cavity (29.4%), followed by accessory sinuses (13.9%) and larynx (13.5%). Nasopharyngeal cancer affected young people, with 34.5% of affected patients aged between 10 and 19 years. The commonest histopathological type was squamous cell carcinoma (49.6%). Majority (47.6%) of patients presented at stage IV. Conclusion: The commonest HNCA is oral cancer. Majority of patients with HNCA are presenting late calling for public health education to raise awareness and promote early detection.
Advanced Abdominal Pregnancy: A Study of 13 Consecutive Cases seen in 1993 and 1994 at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
H.S. Opare-Addo, S. Deganus
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2000,
Abstract: Thirteen cases of advanced abdominal pregnancy (AAP) managed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana, over a two-year period (1993–1994) are presented. An incidence ratio of one advanced abdominal pregnancy to 1,320 deliveries occurred during this period. The ratio of advanced abdominal pregnancy to ectopic pregnancy was 1:43.7. The perinatal mortality rate and maternal case fatality rates were 69.6% and 15.3% respectively. Recurrent abdominal pains in the gravid patient with abnormal fetal lie and prior history of tubal pregnancy and/or previous abdominal surgery were significant findings in the cases reviewed. These findings should, therefore, always prompt lucid and elaborate ultrasound examination of a pregnancy to exclude abdominal pregnancy. (Afr J Reprod Health 2000; 4 [1]: 28-39) Key Words: Advanced abdominal pregnancy, Ghana, Komfo Anokye Hospital, maternal mortality
The range of abdominal surgical emergencies in children older than 1 year at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
FA Abantanga, B Nimako, M Amoah
Annals of African Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Background : Acute abdominal conditions are a common reason for emergency admission of children. Little is available in the literature about such conditions in our subregion, especially Ghana. Objective : The aim of this study was to investigate the range of emergency abdominal surgical conditions amongst children in the subregion, with particular reference to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. A prospective survey of all children older than 1 year undergoing an emergency abdominal surgery was carried out. Methods : Details of all children (except infants) operated for an acute surgical abdominal condition over a 5-year period were entered into a specially designed form, capturing patient characteristics, surgical causes of the emergency, operative procedure, complications, morbidity and mortality rates. Results : Nine hundred fifty-five children aged >1 year but <15 years were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 8.8 ± 3.2 years. The leading causes of surgical abdominal emergencies were typhoid perforation (TP) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), 68%; acute appendicitis, 16%; abdominal trauma and intestinal obstruction (including intussusception), 4.7% each; irreducible external hernias, 2.5%; primary peritonitis, 1.0%; gallbladder disease and gastric perforation, 0.8% each. Many children died from the TP group; case fatality for TP alone was 12.6%. The overall mortality was 9.7%. Morbidity was influenced by the presence of major peritoneal contamination, continuing peritonitis and surgical site infections (SSIs), which led to long hospital stay. Conclusions : In our hospital, TP of the GIT, acute appendicitis, intestinal obstruction, irreducible external hernias and primary peritonitis were the most common abdominal emergencies encountered in children after infancy. The high morbidity and mortality in TP is attributable to ignorance, poor sanitation and delay in reporting to hospital for treatment.
Management of contractures: A five-year experience at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi
EJK Adu
Ghana Medical Journal , 2011,
Abstract: Background: Contractures are common complications of wounds healing by secondary intention; some cases are idiopathic and a few are congenital. Contractures cause significant morbidity to patients. Objective: The study was undertaken to document the pattern, spectrum and management of patients with contractures of various types and aetiologies presenting at a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgical Unit in Ghana. Design: Prospective study from January 2004 to December 2008. Setting: Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi Patients and Methods: The age, sex, site, extent and cause of contracture was documented. The patients were examined and functional impairment recorded. A clinical photograph was taken. Patients requiring surgery had their contractures released and the defect repaired with an appropriate reconstructive technique. Patients with minimal functional impairment underwent physical therapy without surgery. Results: Sixty-eight patients comprising 44 males and 24 females were seen. Male to female ratio is 1.83:1. Their ages ranged from 0.66 to 60 years, mean age was 22.53 years. Seventy-six contractures were studied. Fifty-eight of the lesions were in the upper part of the body. Burns, infections and trauma were the main aetiological causes. Seventy-one surgical procedures were performed including release and flap repair (33), full thickness skin graft (23) and partial thickness skins graft and splinting (six). Conclusions: Thermal burns and soft tissue infections are the commonest causes of contractures presenting at KATH in Kumasi. These causes of contractures are preventable by early and adequate treatment of the acute conditions.
The range of abdominal surgical emergencies in children older than 1 year at the komfo anokye teaching hospital, Kumasi, Ghana  [cached]
Abantanga F,Nimako B,Amoah M
Annals of African Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Background : Acute abdominal conditions are a common reason for emergency admission of children. Little is available in the literature about such conditions in our subregion, especially Ghana. Objective : The aim of this study was to investigate the range of emergency abdominal surgical conditions amongst children in the subregion, with particular reference to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. A prospective survey of all children older than 1 year undergoing an emergency abdominal surgery was carried out. Methods : Details of all children (except infants) operated for an acute surgical abdominal condition over a 5-year period were entered into a specially designed form, capturing patient characteristics, surgical causes of the emergency, operative procedure, complications, morbidity and mortality rates. Results : Nine hundred fifty-five children aged > 1 year but < 15 years were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 8.8 ± 3.2 years. The leading causes of surgical abdominal emergencies were typhoid perforation (TP) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), 68%; acute appendicitis, 16%; abdominal trauma and intestinal obstruction (including intussusception), 4.7% each; irreducible external hernias, 2.5%; primary peritonitis, 1.0%; gallbladder disease and gastric perforation, 0.8% each. Many children died from the TP group; case fatality for TP alone was 12.6%. The overall mortality was 9.7%. Morbidity was influenced by the presence of major peritoneal contamination, continuing peritonitis and surgical site infections (SSIs), which led to long hospital stay. Conclusions : In our hospital, TP of the GIT, acute appendicitis, intestinal obstruction, irreducible external hernias and primary peritonitis were the most common abdominal emergencies encountered in children after infancy. The high morbidity and mortality in TP is attributable to ignorance, poor sanitation and delay in reporting to hospital for treatment.
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