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One-year outcome of Senning operation in children with transposition of the great vessels
Shahmohammadi A,Mortezaian H,Alipour MR
Tehran University Medical Journal , 2011,
Abstract: "nBackground: Nowadays, the treatment of choice for anatomical correction of transposition of great arteries is arterial switch but some children are not good candidates for this operation. In these cases atrial switch or Senning procedure is an accepted method, thus outcome of this procedure needs to be better delineated."n "nMethods: This prospective study included 65 patients that underwent Senning operation in Shahid Rajaee Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2002 to 2009 and were followed-up for one year."n "nResults: The early and late mortality rates were 16.9% and 1.5%, respectively. 51.8% of early deaths were due to simple Senning procedure, 38.9% due to a Senning with the closure of ventricular septal defect, with or without the repair of pulmonary artery stenosis, 9.3% related to palliative Senning and one late death due to simple Senning. The most common arrhythmia was accelerated junctional rhythm (18.5%). 15% of cases had Senning pathway obstruction and 1.7% had baffle leaks. Regardless of the mortalities, three patients (5.7%) had significant tricuspid regurgitation. Right ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 13.3% of the cases, primarily in Senning with ventricular septal defect closure (37.5%). One case (1.9%) had visible cyanosis and three (5.7%) had exertional dyspnea but 94.3% of cases remained in functional class I."n "nConclusion: Since the majority of deaths following Senning procedure occur during the first month, especially on the second day post-operatively, assiduity during early post-operative period is crucial. Tricuspid regurgitation or right ventricular systolic dysfunction was not detected in most patients, suggesting optimistic prognosis for these patients.
Serial exercise testing in children, adolescents and young adults with Senning repair for transposition of the great arteries  [cached]
Buys Roselien,Budts Werner,Reybrouck Tony,Gewillig Marc
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2261-12-88
Abstract: Background Patients with Senning repair for complete transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) show an impaired exercise tolerance. Our aim was to investigate changes in exercise capacity in children, adolescents and adults with Senning operation. Methods Peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), oxygen pulse and heart rate were assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPET) and compared to normal values. Rates of change were calculated by linear regression analysis. Right ventricular (RV) function was assessed by echocardiography. Results Thirty-four patients (22 male) performed 3.5 (range 3–6) CPET with an interval of ≥ 6 months. Mean age at first assessment was 16.4 ± 4.27 years. Follow-up period averaged 6.8 ± 2 years. Exercise capacity was reduced (p<0.0005) and the decline of peak VO2 ( 1.3 ± 3.7 %/year; p=0.015) and peak oxygen pulse ( 1.4 ± 3.0 %/year; p=0.011) was larger than normal, especially before adulthood and in female patients (p<0.01). During adulthood, RV contractility changes were significantly correlated with the decline of peak oxygen pulse (r= 0.504; p=0.047). Conclusions In patients with Senning operation for d-TGA, peak VO2 and peak oxygen pulse decrease faster with age compared to healthy controls. This decline is most obvious during childhood and adolescence, and suggests the inability to increase stroke volume to the same extent as healthy peers during growth. Peak VO2 and peak oxygen pulse remain relatively stable during early adulthood. However, when RV contractility decreases, a faster decline in peak oxygen pulse is observed.
Follow-up of our patients with transposition of the great arteries and arterial switch operation; comparison of simple and complex transposition cases  [cached]
Osman Akdeniz,Canan Ayabakan,Uygar Y?rüker,Kür?ad Tokel
Anadolu Kardiyoloji Dergisi , 2011,
Abstract: Objective: 1. Follow-up data of patients with simple transposition of great arteries (TGA) and TGA with ventricular septal defect (VSD), who had arterial switch operation (ASO) are compared. 2. Factors affecting mortality and morbidity after ASO are described.Methods: Seventy-six patients, who had an ASO between April 2007 and August 2010 were studied retrospectively. The patients with intact ventricular septum (IVS) (n=36) were in Group1, and those with VSD (n=40) in Group 2. The pre and postoperative clinical and echocardiographic variables and intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes were compared among groups using Mann-Whitney U, Pearson correlation and logistic regression tests.Results: The mean age at operation was 44.1 days, weight was 3.6±0.98 kg. Patients were followed for 15.5±11.21 months. The aortic cross-clamp (AoCC) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times were higher in patients with VSD (p=0.001, p=0.004). Patients in Group 1 had longer inotropic agent infusion (p=0.001). Length of stay in ICU was similar in two groups (p>0.05). There was no correlation between the length of stay in ICU and age, weight, CPB time, AoCC time. Aortic regurgitation was more frequent in Group 2 (p=0.02). During follow-up, 12 patients died (15.7%), and 8 patients had a revision operation (10.5%) (diaphragmatic plication in 4, pulmonary artery reconstruction in 1, recoarctation operation in 3 patients). Mortality was similar in groups (p>0.05).Conclusion: Arterial switch operation provides anatomical correction in TGA. Appropriate timing and good perioperative planning facilitates low morbidity and mortality in patients with VSD as in patients with simple TGA.
Accessory mitral valve tissue causing severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in a post-Senning patient with transposition of the great arteries
Prashanth Panduranga,Thomas Eapen,Salim Al-Maskari,Abdullah Al-Farqani
Heart International , 2011, DOI: 10.4081/hi.2011.e6
Abstract: Accessory mitral valve tissue is a rare congenital anomaly associated with congenital cardiac defects and is usually detected in the first decade of life. We describe the case of an 18-year old post-Senning asymptomatic patient who was found to have accessory mitral valve tissue on transthoracic echocardiography producing severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction.
Noninvasive Assessment of Autonomic Cardiovascular Function in Patients after Arterial Switch Operation for Transposition of the Great Arteries  [PDF]
Joanna Hlebowicz, Maja Rooth, Sandra Lindstedt, Johan Holm, Ulf Thilén
Surgical Science (SS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2015.63020
Abstract:

Background: Children born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) must undergo corrective surgery for survival, arterial switch being the standard surgical procedure. The sympathetic innervation of the heart may be damaged during the operation. This study was designed to determine whether adults who were born with TGA and who had arterial switch operation (ASO) in infancy exhibit denervation of the heart, measured as heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiography (ECG). Methods: Nine patients with transposition of the great arteries (four men and five women; mean age 26 ± 1 years) who underwent the ASO at a mean age of 85 ± 35 days, and nine healthy adults (five men and five women; mean age 26 ± 2) were included in the study. Cardiac autonomic nerve function was determined by the variation in RR intervals during maximal deep breathing, monitored by continuous ECG. The mean values were calculated for each group from six inspirations (I) and expirations (E), and the E:I ratios were calculated. Results: The E:I ratio did not differ between patients with an arterial switch and healthy controls (P= 0.161). Two patients had signs of denervation of the heart up to 30 years after the arterial switch operation. Conclusions: Reinnervation of the heartmay take place in patients who have undergone the ASO in infancy, and these patients would not necessarily suffer from autonomic dysfunction. The HRV, measured by ECG, has the potential to identify arterially switched patients at risk of developing silent myocardial ischemia.

Midterm results after arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries: a single centre experience  [cached]
Popov Aron Frederik,Tirilomis Theodor,Giesler Michael,Oguz Coskun Kasim
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8090-7-83
Abstract: Background The arterial switch operation (ASO) has become the surgical approach of choice for d-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). There is, however an increased incidence of midterm and longterm adverse sequelae in some survivors. In order to evaluate operative risk and midterm outcome in this population, we reviewed patients who underwent ASO for TGA at our centre. Methods In this retrospective study 52 consecutive patients with TGA who underwent ASO between 04/1991 and 12/1999 were included. To analyze the predictors for mortality and adverse events (coronary stenoses, distortion of the pulmonary arteries, dilatation of the neoaortic root, and aortic regurgitation), a multivariate analysis was performed. The follow-up time was ranged from 1–10 years (mean 5 years, cumulative 260 patient-years). Results All over mortality rate was 15.4% and was only observed in the early postoperative period till 1994. The predictors for poor operative survival were low APGAR-score, older age at surgery, and necessity of associated surgical procedures. Late re-operations were necessary in 6 patients (13.6%) and included a pulmonary artery patch enlargement due to supravalvular stenosis (n = 3), coronary revascularisation due to coronary stenosis in a coronary anatomy type E, aortic valve replacement due to neoaortic valve regurgitation (n = 2), and patch-plasty of a pulmonary vein due to obstruction (n = 1). The dilatation of neoaortic root was not observed in the follow up. Conclusions ASO remains the procedure of choice for TGA with acceptable early and late outcome in terms of overall survival and freedom of reoperation. Although ASO is often complex and may be associated with morbidity, most patients survived without major complications even in a small centre.
Transposition of the great arteries
Paula Martins, Eduardo Castela
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1750-1172-3-27
Abstract: The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography, which also provides the morphological details required for future surgical management. Prenatal diagnosis by foetal echocardiography is possible and desirable, as it may improve the early neonatal management and reduce morbidity and mortality. Differential diagnosis includes other causes of central neonatal cyanosis. Palliative treatment with prostaglandin E1 and balloon atrial septostomy are usually required soon after birth. Surgical correction is performed at a later stage. Usually, the Jatene arterial switch operation is the procedure of choice. Whenever this operation is not feasible, adequate alternative surgical approach should be implemented. With the advent of newer and improved surgical techniques and post operative intensive care, the long-term survival is approximately 90% at 15 years of age. However, the exercise performance, cognitive function and quality of life may be impaired.Transposition of the great arteries; physiologically uncorrected transposition; complete transposition; atrioventricular concordance with ventriculoarterial discordance. The European paediatric cardiac code for this disease is 01.05.01.The transposition of the great arteries was first described by Mathew Baillie in 1797, in the second edition of the book "The Morbid Anatomy of Some of the Most Important Parts of the Human Body". However, the term transposition was only applied in 1814, by Farre, meaning that aorta and pulmonary trunk were placed (positio) across (trans) the ventricular septum.In fact, this congenital cardiac malformation is characterised by atrioventricular concordance and ventriculoarterial discordance. In other words, the morphological right atrium is connected to the morphological right ventricle which gives rise entirely to or most of the aorta; the morphological left atrium is connected to the morphological left ventricle from where the pulmonary trunk emerges [1].The term congenitally corrected transposition
Myocardial cell damage related to arterial switch operation in neonates with transposition of the great arteries
HH H?vels-Gürich, JF Vazquez-Jimenez, A Silvestri, K Schumacher, S Kreitz, J Duchateau, BJ Messmer, G von Bernuth, M-C Seghaye
Critical Care , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/cc1009
Abstract: Sixty-three neonates (age 2-28 [8.1 ± 4.6] days), who were operated on under combined deep hypothermic (15°C) circulatory arrest and low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), were studied. Inclusion criteria were transposition of the great arteries with or without ventricular septal defect (VSD) that was suitable for arterial switch operation (VSD-; n = 53), and if necessary additional VSD closure (VSD+; n = 10). Patients were differentiated clinically into two groups by presence or absence of MD within 24 h after surgery. MD was defined as myocardial ischaemia after coronary reperfusion and/or myocardial hypocontractility as assessed by echocardiography. MD was related to clinical outcome parameters and to perioperative release of cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) and production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8.MD was observed in 11 patients (17.5%). Two patients died early after surgery from myocardial infarction, and two died late after surgery (6.3%). CPB and cross-clamping, but not deep hypothermic circulatory arrest times, were correlated with MD; MD was more frequent in the VSD+ than in the VSD- group because of longer support times. Coronary status and age at surgery were not related to MD. Patients with MD had more frequently impaired cardiac, respiratory and renal functions. cTnT, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 were significantly elevated at the end of CPB, and 4 and 24 h after surgery, as compared with preoperative values in both groups. Postoperative cTnT, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 concentrations were significantly higher in MD patients than in the others. Multivariable analysis of independent risk factors for MD revealed interleukin-6 4 h after surgery to be significant (P = 0.04; odds ratio 1.24 [95% confidence interval 1.01-1.52] per 10 pg/ml). The cutoff point for prediction of MD was set at 500 pg/ml (specificity 95.4%, sensitivity 72.7%).Cardiac operations in neonates induce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interelukin-6 and interleuki
The Difficulties in Determining Time of the Operation in the Total Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries with Severe Left AV Valve Regurgitation: Case Report
Erden ? et al.
Konuralp Tip Dergisi , 2010,
Abstract: Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA) is characterized by discordance between the atria and ventricles, as well as between the ventricles and the great arteries. As a result, the morphologic right ventricle lies to the left of the morphologic left ventricle and becomes the systemic ventricle. The morphologic right ventricle gives rise to the aorta, which is anterior of the pulmonary artery. As a result of discordance at both the atrioventricular (AV) and the great vessel level, physiologic blood flow remains normal. It was shown that the decreased RV functions are related with increased mortality rates in long term follow up. Most of these patients have RV failure due to abnormal pressure load of systemic RV, imbalance between O2 supply and myocardial demand and development of systemic AV valvular regurgitation in most of the patients. Therefore, the most important and difficult point in the follow up of these patients is evaluation of RV functions and degree of systemic AV valve regurgitation. In this review, we discussed the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients in the light of a typical TGA case.
Palliation for transposition of great arteries
VO Adegboye, SI Omokhodion, O Ogunkunle, AI Brimmo, OA Adepo
Nigerian Journal of Surgical Research , 2003,
Abstract: Background: At the University College Hospital Ibadan we have no facility for total surgical correction of transportation of the great arteries (TGA). This prospective study reviews the palliative procedures we have used in the management of TGA. Method: Patients with the diagnosis of TGA were evaluated for morphological type. The choice of palliative procedure was made in some of the patients with morphological type in mind. No fixed criteria were used for allocating patients to Blalock-Hanlon (B-H), atrial septectomy while pulmonary banding (PB) and Blalock-Taussig (B-T) shunt have definite indications. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients with TGA were palliated. The ages of these patients ranged between 3 to 11 months (6.8 ± 2.4 months), there were 8 males to 6 females (1.3:1). Six patients had B-H atrial septectomy and 2(33.3%) died within 48 hours, 4 patients had B-T shunt and there were no mortality, 4 patients had PB and 2 (50.0%) died within 72 hours. The overall operative mortality was 28.6%. All the 10 survivors had improvement of their clinical features and fall in packed cell volume during the period of follow-up, which lasted 5 to 13 months (mean 9.3 ± 1.2 months). All patients had delayed wound healing. Conclusion: Appropriate and timely palliative surgery has a place in patients with TGA as an interim care. Key Words: Palliative surgery, transposition, great arteries Nigerian Journal of Surgical Research Vol.5(1&2) 2003: 129-133
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