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Educators’ Perceptions of Peer Harassment among Rural Day Secondary Schools Pupils in Gweru, Zimbabwe  [cached]
Nothabo Shoko
Asian Social Science , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ass.v8n13p80
Abstract: This study was carried out to explore educators’ perceptions of peer harassment among rural day secondary school pupils in Gweru, Zimbabwe. The study was based on the assumption that peer harassment among secondary school pupils is a problem that needs to be prevented and so educators were viewed as critical players in the prevention of the problem hence it was important to understand their perceptions. The study was based on a sample of fifty five educators drawn from five randomly selected rural day secondary schools in Gweru district. The fifty five educators included five school heads who were purposively selected, twenty four female teachers and twenty six male teachers. All the teachers were selected using stratified random sampling. The main findings of the study were that all the educators agreed that nasty jokes, hitting and kicking and social exclusion were forms of peer harassment experienced by their pupils at school. However, their understanding of the effects of peer harassment on the victims’ social development is underpinned by the different perceptions they have about the problem. While the majority of the educators perceived pupils who were subjected to such experiences by other pupils as having their human rights being violated, some of the educators thought that having pupils being subjected to such experiences was socially acceptable and it had positive benefits for the pupils’ socialization. The findings also revealed that there were diverging views when it came to the educators’ perceptions on spreading malicious rumors and sexual harassment among pupils. The divergence of views was based on gender divisions. While female educators perceived sexual harassment as a prevalent form of peer harassment among their pupils, male educators did not perceive it as being prevalent. Further variations in perceptions were also noted between teachers and school heads. While teachers thought peer harassment was a problem among pupils, three out of the five school heads thought teachers were viewing the dynamics of pupils’ interactional processes using concepts that were alien to the Zimbabwean culture. The study concluded that there was a worrying diversity of perceptions among educators which could lead to varied responses in handling issues of peer harassment among pupils. Based on these findings, the study recommends that extensive studies be carried out to establish other stakeholders’ perceptions of peer harassment so to enable authorities to come up with a shared conceptualization of the problem and so enhance the crafting of effective int
Validation of the Oxford- Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences  [cached]
Hassan Yaghoubi,Ali Mohammadzadeh
Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Background: The Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE) is a 104-item tool made based on the factor analysis of 15 available scales to measure schizotypy. This research aims to investigate the psychometric properties of Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences. Materials and Methods: Conducted as an ex-post facto survey, this study is a descriptive cross–sectional research. A sample of 482 patients was selected and assessed through stratified random sampling from different faculties of Shahid Madani University of Azarbaijan. Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis method by means of the Principal Component Analysis method.Results: Factor analysis using the Principal Component Analysis method extracted five principal factors, which were named cognitive disorganization, impulsive nonconformity, unusual experiences/magical thinking, introvertive anhedonia, and isolation. In addition, two other types of validity (concurrency and correlation of subscales with the total scale and each other) and three types of reliability (test-retest, half-splitting, and internal consistency) were reported.Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, O-LIFE has favorable psychometric properties in the Iranian society and is applicable in psychiatric and psychologic researches as a valid tool.
School governing bodies: the experiences of South African educators
Noleen Van Wyk
South African Journal of Education , 2004,
Abstract: The South African Schools Act of 1996 (SASA) mandates the establishment of school governing bodies (SGBs), comprising parents, educators and non-educator members of staff. As parents are required to form the majority on an SGB, they have been placed in a powerful position with authority to influence fundamental issues, such as school budget, school and language policy, discipline, and appointment and promotion of teaching and administrative staff. A survey of educators' experiences and perceptions of the role of SGBs, followed by in-depth interviews with selected principals, was undertaken. Findings suggested that educators do not consider their SGBs to be very effective. They support the role of the SGB in learner discipline, but they have reservations about its role in matters of educator misconduct. The role of the SGB in appointing staff is accepted, although educators feel that school governors should be trained for this and all other functions of the SGB. Many educators are concerned that the principal may dominate the SGB. Results further suggested that a purely legalistic approach to dividing the responsibilities of SGBs may not always be helpful and that the emphasis should rather be placed on the constitutional principles for co-operative governance. South African Journal of Education Vol.24(1) 2004: 49-54
Experiences That Lead to Growth for Educators and Learners  [cached]
Julian Kitchen
Brock Education : a Journal of Educational Research and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: The commonplace of education—teacher, learner, curriculum and milieu (Schwab, 1970)—exist in all schools, but the experience is educative only to the degree that these commonplaces interact to spark learning. The authors of the articles in this issue of Brock Education all puzzle over the experiences of teachers and/or learners. In each case, their aim is to improve practice and, through this, contribute to a better world.
The feelings and thoughts of mental health nurses concerning the management of distressed and disturbed in-patients: A comparative qualitative European study  [PDF]
Vida Staniulien?, Mary Chambers, Xenya Kantaris, Raija Kontio, Lauri Kuosmanen, Anne Scott, Maria Antónia Rebelo Botelho, Renzo Zanotti, Maritta V?lim?ki
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2013.36058
Abstract:

High levels of distress and disturbance amongst those experiencing acute mental illness can be a major problem for mental health nurses. The feelings experienced by these nurses when caring for and supporting disturbed and/or distressed patients along with their concurrent thoughts are not well described in the literature. To date, this complex issue has not been explored within a comparative European context. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the feelings and thoughts of mental health nurses when supporting and caring for distressed and/or disturbed patients in 6 European countries. Methods: Focus groups were used to collect data from 130 mental health nurses working in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results: Data were analysed using content analysis. Findings highlighted 6 broad themes: 1) Mixed emotions: expressive and responsive, 2) Procedure for caring for and supporting disturbed and/or distressed patients, 3) Use of guidelines for caring and supporting disturbed and/or distressed patients, 4) Team and organisational support, 5) Ethical concerns: Cognitive dissonance and 6) Education and training. Commonalities and differences were found across all themes. Approaches to care, nurses’ role and education, clinical guidelines and/or standards vary from country to country, therefore the care, treatment and management of distressed and/or disturbed patients are various. As a result, mental health nurses have different experiences, various emotional quandaries concurrent with cognitive dissonance and different coping strategies when caring for and supporting distressed and disturbed patients. Conclusions: More emphasis needs to be given to the emotional quandaries and concurrent cognitive dissonance experienced by mental health nurses caring for distressed and/or disturbed inpatients in acute psychiatric settings. Increased access to education and training with particular attention to interpersonal communication and relationship building within clinical teams needs to be a priority given the experiences described by mental health nurses.

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND CHANGE. The Experiences of Literature Teacher Educators
ILANA ELKAD-LEHMAN,HAVA GREENSFELD
L1 Educational Studies in Language and Literature , 2008,
Abstract: This paper presents vignettes from life-stories of literature teacher educators, who participated in a wide-scale research project. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with these individuals, as part of a study into their professional development as literature teacher educators. The findings indicate changes in their thinking about literature and the instruction of literature, as well as changes in their understanding of their role as literature teacher educators. The findings allowed us to construct a dynamic model of professional development of literature teacher educators. This study contributes new insight regarding processes of teacher educators’ professional development and change in their thinking about their work.
"She would sit with me": mothers' experiences of individual peer support for exclusive breastfeeding in Uganda
Jolly Nankunda, James K Tumwine, Victoria Nankabirwa, Thorkild Tyllesk?r, PROMISE-EBF Study Group
International Breastfeeding Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1746-4358-5-16
Abstract: In the Ugandan site of PROMISE-EBF, a multi-centre community randomised trial to evaluate the effect of peer counselling for exclusive breastfeeding on infant health, 370 women in the intervention arm participated in a study exit interview. Individual peer counselling was offered to women in 12 of the 24 study clusters, scheduled as five visits: before childbirth and during weeks 1, 4, 7 and 10 after childbirth. During the visits, the women were given information and skills to help them breastfeed exclusively. After the 10-week visit, they were interviewed about their feelings and experiences related to the peer counselling.Overall, more than 95% of the women expressed satisfaction with the various aspects of peer counselling offered. Those who had received five or more visits were more likely to give positive responses about their experience with peer counselling than those who had received fewer visits. They explained their satisfaction with time spent with the peer counsellor in terms of how much she discussed with them. Most women felt their knowledge needs about breastfeeding were covered by the peer counsellors, while others expressed a desire to learn about complementary feeding and family planning. Attributes of the peer counsellors included their friendliness, being women and giving support in a familiar and relaxed way. Women were positive about the acquisition of knowledge and the benefit to their babies from the peer counselling. They preferred a peer counsellor to a health worker for support of exclusive breastfeeding because of their friendly approach.Individual peer counselling to support exclusive breastfeeding was positively received by the women.clinicaltrials.gov no: NCT00397150.The critical importance of exclusive breastfeeding for child survival has continued to be highlighted [1,2]. In Africa, almost all mothers breastfeed their infants, but exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life is rare [3-6]. In the recent Maternal and Child
A narrative analysis of educators’ lived experiences of motherhood and teaching
M Knowles, J Nieuwenhuis, B Smit
South African Journal of Education , 2009,
Abstract: In this article we argue that mothers often construct images of what they perceive as society’s expectations of them. These images become the parameters in the eyes of society to which they aspire. This is reminiscent of the adage: “I am not who you think I am. I am not who I think I am. I am who I think you think I am”. This study is based on analysis of the life-stories of four professional female educators. These mother-educators shared their assumptions, cultural values and beliefs and showed how these shaped the subjective construction and harmonisation of the multiple roles of mother and educator. It was found that they often find themselves faced with the conflicting and complementary dimensions of the multiple roles of mother and professional. We contend that these mothers set high standards and expectations for themselves as mother-educator and they worry about failing, not only themselves, but also ‘others’. They see the world of work, including parents, educators and school principal, as being against them — which is possibly a manifestation of a faltering self-image and linked to feelings of inadequacy. It is argued that mother educators need to negotiate new meaning in terms of their own perceived multiple role expectations so as to enable them to experience success as both homemakers and professionals. The challenge for the mother then is to engage in a constant search for her own identity.
Torrenting values, feelings, and thoughts—Cyber nursing and virtual self-care in a breast augmentation forum  [cached]
Martin Salzmann-Erikson,Henrik Eriksson
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health & Well-Being , 2011, DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.7378
Abstract: Earlier research shows that breast augmentation is positively correlated with positive psychological states. The aim of this study was to explore the shared values, feelings, and thoughts within the culture of breast enlargement among women visiting Internet-based forums when considering and/or undergoing esthetic plastic surgery. The study used a netnographic method for gathering and analyzing data. The findings show that the women used the Internet forum to provide emotional support to other women. Through electronic postings, they cared for and nursed each others’ anxiety and feelings throughout the whole process. Apart from the process, another central issue was that the women's relationships were frequently discussed; specifically their relationship to themselves, their environment, and with the surgeons. The findings suggest that Internet forums represent a channel through which posters can share values, feelings, and thoughts from the position of an agent of action as well as from a position as the object of action. These dual positions and the medium endow the women with a virtual nursing competence that would otherwise be unavailable. By introducing the concept of torrenting as a means of sharing important self-care information, the authors provide a concept that can be further explored in relation to post modern self-care strategies within contemporary nursing theories and practice.
A narrative analysis of educators' lived experiences of motherhood and teaching
Mariska Knowles,Jan Nieuwenhuis,Brigitte Smit
South African Journal of Education , 2009,
Abstract: In this article we argue that mothers often construct images of what they per-ceive as society's expectations of them. These images become the parameters in the eyes of society to which they aspire. This is reminiscent of the adage: "I am not who you think I am. I am not who I think I am. I am who I think you think I am". This study is based on analysis of the life-stories of four profes-sional female educators. These mother-educators shared their assumptions, cultural values and beliefs and showed how these shaped the subjective construction and harmonisation of the multiple roles of mother and educator. It was found that they often find themselves faced with the conflicting and complementary dimensions of the multiple roles of mother and professional. We contend that these mothers set high standards and expectations for themselves as mother-educator and they worry about failing, not only themselves, but also 'others'. They see the world of work, including parents, educators and school principal, as being against them - which is possibly a manifestation of a fal-tering self-image and linked to feelings of inadequacy. It is argued that mother educators need to negotiate new meaning in terms of their own perceived multi-ple role expectations so as to enable them to experience success as both home-makers and professionals. The challenge for the mother then is to engage in a constant search for her own identity.
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