oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Aprendiendo de Ple?nik
Petric,Jelena; Graham,Martin; Hecht,Romy;
ARQ (Santiago) , 2009, DOI: 10.4067/S0717-69962009000200016
Abstract: the generation of the master plan of ljubljana develops according to different layers of information: public spaces, patrimonial buildings, new architecture projects, bridges over the ljubljanica river, and others. the experience of the city is presented by ple?nik as a base for the development of its total planning and as the unifying element of its proposal.
Aprendiendo de Ple nik  [cached]
Jelena Petric,Martin Graham,Romy Hecht
ARQ , 2009,
Abstract: La generación del master plan de la ciudad de Ljubljana se desarrolla según distintas capas de información: espacios públicos, edificios patrimoniales, nuevos proyectos de arquitectura, puentes sobre el río Ljubljanica y otros. La experiencia de la ciudad es planteada por Ple nik como base para el desarrollo de la planificación total y como elemento unificador de la propuesta. The generation of the master plan of Ljubljana develops according to different layers of information: public spaces, patrimonial buildings, new architecture projects, bridges over the Ljubljanica River, and others. The experience of the city is presented by Ple nik as a base for the development of its total planning and as the unifying element of its proposal.
Mitochondrial Acetylation and Diseases of Aging
Gregory R. Wagner,R. Mark Payne
Journal of Aging Research , 2011, DOI: 10.4061/2011/234875
Abstract: In recent years, protein lysine acetylation has emerged as a prominent and conserved regulatory posttranslational modification that is abundant on numerous enzymes involved in the processes of intermediary metabolism. Well-characterized mitochondrial processes of carbon utilization are enriched in acetyl-lysine modifications. Although seminal discoveries have been made in the basic biology of mitochondrial acetylation, an understanding of how acetylation states influence enzyme function and metabolic reprogramming during pathological states remains largely unknown. This paper will examine our current understanding of eukaryotic acetate metabolism and present recent findings in the field of mitochondrial acetylation biology. The implications of mitochondrial acetylation for the aging process will be discussed, as well as its potential implications for the unique and localized metabolic states that occur during the aging-associated conditions of heart failure and cancer growth.
Ple nik’s concept of planning the rehabilitation of Ljubljana  [PDF]
Andreja Jan
Urbani Izziv , 2001,
Abstract: Most of Ple nik’s work was achieved in the strict urban core, mainly on the edge joining the historical medieval core with the new city. Ple nik gradually created a composition of places surrounding the old city that became important connecting elements between the medieval and modern city, at that time in its first development surge. From his work it is clear that he achieved his imaginary city gradually and methodically, with architectural emphasis and based on ties between particular key places in the city. He recognised these key spaces in the city, tied them together with axes and merged them into the present urban tissue.
Investigation of the Acetylation Mechanism by GCN5 Histone Acetyltransferase  [PDF]
Junfeng Jiang, Junyan Lu, Dan Lu, Zhongjie Liang, Lianchun Li, Sisheng Ouyang, Xiangqian Kong, Hualiang Jiang, Bairong Shen, Cheng Luo
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036660
Abstract: The histone acetylation of post-translational modification can be highly dynamic and play a crucial role in regulating cellular proliferation, survival, differentiation and motility. Of the enzymes that mediate post-translation modifications, the GCN5 of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) proteins family that add acetyl groups to target lysine residues within histones, has been most extensively studied. According to the mechanism studies of GCN5 related proteins, two key processes, deprotonation and acetylation, must be involved. However, as a fundamental issue, the structure of hGCN5/AcCoA/pH3 remains elusive. Although biological experiments have proved that GCN5 mediates the acetylation process through the sequential mechanism pathway, a dynamic view of the catalytic process and the molecular basis for hGCN5/AcCoA/pH3 are still not available and none of theoretical studies has been reported to other related enzymes in HAT family. To explore the molecular basis for the catalytic mechanism, computational approaches including molecular modeling, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation were carried out. The initial hGCN5/AcCoA/pH3 complex structure was modeled and a reasonable snapshot was extracted from the trajectory of a 20 ns MD simulation, with considering post-MD analysis and reported experimental results. Those residues playing crucial roles in binding affinity and acetylation reaction were comprehensively investigated. It demonstrated Glu80 acted as the general base for deprotonation of Lys171 from H3. Furthermore, the two-dimensional QM/MM potential energy surface was employed to study the sequential pathway acetylation mechanism. Energy barriers of addition-elimination reaction in acetylation obtained from QM/MM calculation indicated the point of the intermediate ternary complex. Our study may provide insights into the detailed mechanism for acetylation reaction of GCN5, and has important implications for the discovery of regulators against GCN5 enzymes and related HAT family enzymes.
NIK Stabilization in Osteoclasts Results in Osteoporosis and Enhanced Inflammatory Osteolysis  [PDF]
Chang Yang,Kathleen McCoy,Jennifer L. Davis,Marc Schmidt-Supprian,Yoshiteru Sasaki,Roberta Faccio,Deborah Veis Novack
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015383
Abstract: Maintenance of healthy bone requires the balanced activities of osteoclasts (OCs), which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which build bone. Disproportionate action of OCs is responsible for the bone loss associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) controls activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway, a critical pathway for OC differentiation. Under basal conditions, TRAF3-mediated NIK degradation prevents downstream signaling, and disruption of the NIK:TRAF3 interaction stabilizes NIK leading to constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway.
Androgen Receptor Signalling in Prostate Cancer: The Functional Consequences of Acetylation
Derek N. Lavery,Charlotte L. Bevan
Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/862125
Abstract: The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand activated transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone receptor (SHR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. In the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis, tumour growth is dependent on androgens, and AR directly mediates these effects by modulating gene expression. During transcriptional regulation, the AR recruits numerous cofactors with acetylation-modifying enzymatic activity, the best studied include p300/CBP and the p160/SRC family of coactivators. It is known that recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) is key in fine-tuning responses to androgens and is thus likely to play a role in prostate cancer progression. Further, these proteins can also modify the AR itself. The functional consequences of AR acetylation, the role of modifying enzymes in relation to AR transcriptional response, and prostate cancer will be discussed.
Ple nik’s plans for the design of Novi trg  [PDF]
Andreja Jan
Urbani Izziv , 1994,
Abstract: Ple nik’s rearrangement of the centre of Ljubljana is a process, which had already begun in the time of his journey to Italy. The process developed alongside the architectural and urban design plan. The planning of Novi trg (New market) as an important public place shows the development of an architectural idea trough a long period by which a space was monumentalized and idea connections with the city found.
Protein Acetylation in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes  [PDF]
J rg Soppa
Archaea , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/820681
Abstract: Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which—Alba—was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.
Protein Acetylation in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes  [PDF]
J?rg Soppa
Archaea , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/820681
Abstract: Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which—Alba—was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea. 1. Introduction Many different forms of posttranslational modifications of proteins have been characterized. Posttranslational modifications can influence many different features of proteins, for example, their folding, activity, stability, antigenicity, intracellular localization, and interaction with other proteins or with nucleic acids. The fraction of posttranslationally modified proteins and thus the importance of posttranslational modification is generally believed to be very different for eukaryotes—having a high fraction of modified proteins—and prokaryotes, which are thought to harbor only very few modified proteins. For eukaryotes it is thought that acetylation is the most common covalent modification out of 200 types that have been reported [1]. It has also been argued that acetylation is a regulatory modification of the same importance as phosphorylation [2]. The arguments were that acetylation, like phosphorylation, affects many different proteins, can have a variety of consequences, and can regulate key cellular processes in response to extracellular signals [2]. Nevertheless, the wealth of experimental data on protein phosphorylation in eukaryotes is much higher than on acetylation, and in addition, it was typically
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.