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Health-related quality of life in adolescents with screening-detected celiac disease, before and one year after diagnosis and initiation of gluten-free diet, a prospective nested case-referent study
Katrina Nordyke, Fredrik Norstr?m, Lars Lindholm, Hans Stenlund, Anna Rosén, Anneli Ivarsson
BMC Public Health , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-142
Abstract: A prospective nested case-referent study was done involving Swedish adolescents who had participated in a CD screening study when they were in the sixth grade and about 12 years old. The screening-detected adolescents (n = 144) and referents without CD who participated in the same screening (n = 828) received questionnaires at the time of the screening and approximately one year after the screening-detected adolescents had received their diagnosis. The questionnaires included the EQ-5D instrument that was used to measure health status and report HRQoL.The HRQoL for the adolescents with screening-detected CD is similar to the referents, both before and one year after diagnosis and initiation of the gluten-free diet, except in the dimension of pain at follow-up. In the pain dimension at follow-up, fewer cases reported problems than referents (12.6% and 21.9% respectively, Adjusted OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.27-0.94). However, a sex stratified analysis revealed that the significant difference was for boys at follow-up, where fewer screening-detected boys reported problems (4.3%) compared to referent boys (18.8%) (Adjusted OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04-0.73).The findings of this study suggest that adolescents with unrecognized CD experience similar HRQoL as their peers without CD, both before and one year after diagnosis and initiation of gluten-free diet, except for boys in the dimension of pain at follow-up.
Treatment of adolescents with morbid obesity with bariatric procedures and anti-obesity pharmacological agents
Um SS, Slusser W, DeUgarte DA
Open Access Surgery , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAS.S14722
Abstract: eatment of adolescents with morbid obesity with bariatric procedures and anti-obesity pharmacological agents Review (1877) Total Article Views Authors: Um SS, Slusser W, DeUgarte DA Published Date December 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 57 - 63 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAS.S14722 Scott S Um1, Wendelin Slusser2, Daniel A DeUgarte1 1Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Adolescent obesity is a growing health concern that can have immense physical and psychological impact. Treatment of morbidly obese adolescents should include a multidisciplinary team to address medical comorbidities, diet, physical activity, mental health, and behavior modification. Anti-obesity pharmacologic agents have a limited role in the treatment of adolescents because of concerns with side effects, safety, and efficacy. Orlistat (GlaxoSmithKline, Moon Township, PA) is the only approved medication for weight-loss in adolescents. However, it is associated with gastrointestinal side effects and its long-term efficacy is unknown. Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat morbid obesity. However, adolescents must meet rigorous criteria and have appropriate cognitive, psychological, and social clearance before being considered for surgical intervention. Gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation. The adjustable gastric band is not FDA-approved for use in patients under 18 years of age. Sleeve gastrectomy is a promising procedure for adolescents because it avoids an intestinal bypass and the implantation of a foreign body. Prospective longitudinal assessment of bariatric surgery procedures is required to determine long-term outcomes. In this manuscript, we review the treatment options, efficacy, and impact on quality of life for morbidly obese adolescents.
Treatment of adolescents with morbid obesity with bariatric procedures and anti-obesity pharmacological agents
Um SS,Slusser W,DeUgarte DA
Open Access Surgery , 2011,
Abstract: Scott S Um1, Wendelin Slusser2, Daniel A DeUgarte11Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Adolescent obesity is a growing health concern that can have immense physical and psychological impact. Treatment of morbidly obese adolescents should include a multidisciplinary team to address medical comorbidities, diet, physical activity, mental health, and behavior modification. Anti-obesity pharmacologic agents have a limited role in the treatment of adolescents because of concerns with side effects, safety, and efficacy. Orlistat (GlaxoSmithKline, Moon Township, PA) is the only approved medication for weight-loss in adolescents. However, it is associated with gastrointestinal side effects and its long-term efficacy is unknown. Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat morbid obesity. However, adolescents must meet rigorous criteria and have appropriate cognitive, psychological, and social clearance before being considered for surgical intervention. Gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation. The adjustable gastric band is not FDA-approved for use in patients under 18 years of age. Sleeve gastrectomy is a promising procedure for adolescents because it avoids an intestinal bypass and the implantation of a foreign body. Prospective longitudinal assessment of bariatric surgery procedures is required to determine long-term outcomes. In this manuscript, we review the treatment options, efficacy, and impact on quality of life for morbidly obese adolescents.Keywords: bariatric surgery, morbid obesity, weight loss, adolescent
Evaluation of the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED) in adolescents in Turkey  [cached]
Emre Erol,Gülgün Ersoy,Atilla Pulur,Günay ?zdemir
International Journal of Human Sciences , 2010,
Abstract: This study has been carried out for the purpose of determining nutrition habits of adolescents who join selections for national basketball team and evaluating nutrition condition by means of KIDMED index (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index) which is a quick, easy and valid means. 785 male adolescents between 11-14 ages participated in the study. General characteristics, applications about nutrition habits of the participators have been determined by using a questionnaire of 16 questions including Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED). Furthermore, heights (cm) and weights (kg) of the participators have been measured, BMI (Body mass index-kg/m2) values of them have been calculated and they have been contrasted with standard BMI values. In statistical evaluation of data, SPSS 15.0 statistics packaged program has been used. The average age of the participators is 12.7 ± 0.6 year (11-14), weight is 58.9 ± 12.9 kg (31.30-103.8), height is 160 ± 10 cm (130-190) and BMI (Body mass index) average is 20.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2 (14.0-32.1). It is determined that the most missed meal is lunch and then the second one is breakfast. According to evaluation of healthy eating index, 55.7% of the participators are in poor diet quality. Although diet quality of the participators is in medium and good level, it is concluded that informing on nutrition is needed.
Evaluation of Diet Quality of Egyptian Children and Adolescents using Healthy Eating Index
Mervat A. Esmail - Wafaa M.A.Saleh -Nebal A.R.Aboul Ella - Asmaa M. Abd
Egyptian Journal of Hospital Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Background: Healthful eating is essential for development and well-being. Some dietary patterns are associated with 4 of the 10 leading causes of death (coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, stroke, and type 2 diabetes). Major improvements in the health of the public can, therefore, be made by improving people's dietary patterns. The U.S. department of Agriculture has developed an index, called the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) that was updated in the year 2002. It is based on different aspects of a healthful diet; the Index is designed to provide a measure of overall dietary quality, and the compliance with specific Dietary Guidelines recommendations. The aim of our study is to use the healthy eating index to assess the diet quality of a representative sample of the Egyptian children and adolescents and to examine the association between body mass index and caloric intake of the studied sample. Materials & Methods: This study is a part of National Egyptian survey, Diet, Nutrition and Prevention of Chronic Non-communicable Diseases. The Healthy Eating Index was applied with slight modifications to measure how well the studied Egyptian students' diet conforms to recommended healthy eating pattern. The data were based on representative sample (2145) of children and adolescents (10 -18) years in 7 governorates from. One day of dietary intake data (24 hours recall) was collected, during an in-person interview. The Healthy Eating Index measures how well the studied children and adolescents' diets conform to the American Dietary Guidelines recommendations and the Food Guide Pyramid applied in our country. Ten dietary components have been identified and the overall Index has a total possible score ranging from zero to 100. Results: Our results showed that the average Healthy Eating Index score was 59.1 out of a possible 100 and it ranged from 20 to 86, Only 0.5 percent of the students had Healthy Eating scores above 80; while 16.9 percent of them received scores below 50 and the majority (82.5 percent) had scores on the Healthy Eating Index between 51 and 80. In an effort to provide a "rating" of the overall student's diet, a grading scale was developed, the majority of students had diets rated as "Needs Improvement", only 0.5 % received diets rated as "Good" and 16.9 % had diets rated as "Poor". Males achieved a slightly higher average Index than females (59.7 Vs 58.2). The average score for food groups is much lower than that for dietary guidelines (23.5 Vs 35.6) out of total score of 50 for each. There was a significant positive correlation of BMI wi
The Risk Behaviors and Mental Health of Detained Adolescents: A Controlled, Prospective Longitudinal Study  [PDF]
Zhenhua Zhou, Hongyan Xiong, Ran Jia, Guoyu Yang, Tianyou Guo, Zhaoyou Meng, Guangyu Huang, Yao Zhang
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037199
Abstract: Background To assess the behavioral risk factors and mental health needs of adolescents in juvenile detention centers (JDC). Method A total of 238 boys aged 12–17 years was surveyed who had been admitted to a detention center and compared them with boys from the community (n = 238) matched for sex and age. We assessed behavioral risk factors and mental health problems by using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey questionnaire (YRBS) and the Youth Self-Report questionnaire (YSR). Results Young offenders had significantly higher YRBS scores than controls for drug use (odds ratio (OR) 5.16, 95% CI 2.27–7.84), sexual intercourse (OR, 2.51; 95% CI 1.55–2.90), irregular diet (4.78, 2.11–7.51), suicide attempts (1.96, 1.32–5.85), and physical fighting behavior (3.49, 1.60–7.07), but not for tobacco use, alcohol use, and high–risk cycling. Young offenders at the time of admission (6.61, 2.58–15.2), at 6 months (3.12, 1.81–10.1), and at 12 months (5.29, 1.98–13.3) reported statistically higher levels of total mental health problems than adolescents in a community sample. Conclusions Young offenders have a high rate of mental and behavioral disorders. In the detention period, aggressive behavior, self–destructive/identity, and externalizing of problems improved while withdrawn, anxious or depressed, and internalizing of problems worsened.
Self-reported physical and mental health status and quality of life in adolescents: a latent variable mediation model
Richard Sawatzky, Pamela A Ratner, Joy L Johnson, Jacek A Kopec, Bruno D Zumbo
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-8-17
Abstract: The data were obtained via a cross-sectional health survey of 8,225 adolescents in 49 schools in British Columbia, Canada. Structural equation modeling was applied to test the implied latent variable mediation model. The Pratt index (d) was used to evaluate variable importance.Relative to one another, self-reported mental health status was found to be more strongly associated with depressive symptoms, and self-reported physical health status more strongly associated with physical activity. Self-reported physical and mental health status and the five life domains explained 76% of the variance in global QOL. Relatively poorer mental health and physical health were significantly associated with lower satisfaction in each of the life domains. Global QOL was predominantly explained by three of the variables: mental health status (d = 30%), satisfaction with self (d = 42%), and satisfaction with family (d = 20%). Satisfaction with self and family were the predominant mediators of mental health and global QOL (45% total mediation), and of physical health and global QOL (68% total mediation).This study provides support for the validity and relevance of differentiating self-reported physical and mental health status in adolescent health surveys. Self-reported mental health status and, to a lesser extent, self-reported physical health status were associated with significant differences in the adolescents' satisfaction with their family, friends, living environment, school experiences, self, and their global QOL. Questions about adolescents' self-reported physical and mental health status and their experiences with these life domains require more research attention so as to target appropriate supportive services, particularly for adolescents with mental or physical health challenges.Health researchers and providers increasingly recognize the importance of obtaining information about adolescents' perspectives of their quality of life (QOL) [1-10]. Several instruments have been
Mental health and quality of life in pre- and early adolescents: a school-based study in two contrasting urban areas
Cucchiaro, Giulietta;Dalgalarrondo, Paulo;
Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-44462007000300005
Abstract: objective: to estimate the prevalence of mental health problems and to assess the quality of life in pre- and early adolescents living in two contrasting urban areas in brazil, as well as to identify the impact of demographic factors on mental health, quality of life and school performance. method: using school samples, the strength and difficulties questionnaire and the quality of life inventory were administered to 424 (52%) boys and 387 (48%) girls (mean age 12.6 ± 1.3 years) in better-off central and poorer outer-city areas. results: in the total sample, the prevalence of probable psychiatric cases was 10.1% (n = 77). there were no significant differences in the overall prevalence of behavior problems or global quality of life between central and outer-city areas. however, boys from the outer-city had a higher prevalence of conduct problems (12% vs. 6.2%, p = 0.04), although girls did not differ significantly on any measure. in general, factors associated with poorer mental health were: having no religion, divorced parents, and being male. conclusions: living in the poorer outer-city was not associated with worse mental health or quality of life in this sample. this is in contrast with the findings of some other studies, and possible protective factors such as female gender and religion are discussed.
Effect on Health-related Quality of Life of changes in mental health in children and adolescents
Luis Rajmil, Jorge A Palacio-Vieira, Michael Herdman, Sílvia López-Aguilà, Ester Villalonga-Olives, Josep M Valderas, Mireia Espallargues, Jordi Alonso
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-7-103
Abstract: A representative sample of Spanish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years completed the self-administered KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire at baseline and after 3 years. Mental health status was measured using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Changes on SDQ scores over time were used to classify respondents in one of 3 categories (improved, stable, worsened). Data was also collected on gender, undesirable life events, and family socio-economic status. Changes in HRQOL were evaluated using effect sizes (ES). A multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of poor HRQOL at follow-up.Response rate at follow-up was 54% (n = 454). HRQOL deteriorated in all groups on most KIDSCREEN dimensions. Respondents who worsened on the SDQ showed the greatest deterioration, particularly on Psychological well-being (ES = -0.81). Factors most strongly associated with a decrease in HRQOL scores were undesirable life events and worsening SDQ score.Changes in mental health status affect children and adolescents' HRQOL. Improvements in mental health status protect against poorer HRQOL while a worsening in mental health status is a risk factor for poorer HRQOL.Mental health status has been shown to be significantly correlated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in both adult [1] and pediatric [2] populations. In fact, children with mental health problems have been reported to have poorer HRQL than children with physical disorders [3]. Likewise, children's mental disorders were shown to interfere significantly not only with their daily lives but with those of parents and families as well.Most of the studies performed to date on the association between HRQOL and mental health in children have been cross-sectional [2-4]. Few, if any, studies have examined this association using a longitudinal design. In comparison with cross-sectional studies, longitudinal studies help to provide a clearer picture of the direction and magnitude of change in HRQOL, to identi
Is the association between acne and mental distress influenced by diet? Results from a cross-sectional population study among 3775 late adolescents in Oslo, Norway
Jon A Halvorsen, Florence Dalgard, Magne Thoresen, Espen Bjertness, Lars Lien
BMC Public Health , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-9-340
Abstract: A population-based cross-sectional study in Oslo of 18 or 19 year old adolescents. The participation rate was 80%. Acne was self-reported. To measure mental distress, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 10 was used. Diet and lifestyle variables were also collected by questionnaire and socio-demographic variables were obtained from Statistics Norway.The prevalence of acne was 14.4% among the males and 12.8% among the females. The mean score of mental distress increased when the severity of acne increased. In the crude analyses, the significant associations with acne among the males were: mental distress OR = 1.63, frequent consumption of chocolate/sweets OR = 1.40, frequent consumption of potato chips OR = 1.54. The significant crude associations with acne among the females were: mental distress OR = 2.16, infrequent consumption of raw vegetables OR = 1.41, non-Western background OR = 1.77 and low family income OR = 2.14. No crude associations with acne were identified in either gender for the consumption of sugary soft drinks, fatty fish, cigarette smoking or alcohol. In adjusted models which included diet and socio-demographic variables, the association between acne and mental distress was unchanged for both males (OR = 1.68) and females (OR = 2.04), and between acne and infrequent consumption of raw vegetables among the females (OR = 1.38).Among late adolescents in Oslo, self-reported acne is significantly associated with mental distress and, among girls, with infrequent consumption of raw vegetables. Our finding does not support the hypothesis that dietary factors alter the relationship between acne and mental distress.Acne is a very common skin condition of the face and upper trunk affecting millions of adolescents everyday [1]. It is of great interest and importance to explore it further to elucidate possible associated factors which may provide clues to its aetiology.The distribution of acne in populations has been shown to vary across gender [2-8], ethnicity [1,9],
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