Article citations

    Moore, A., Clark, B., & Kane, M. (2008). Who Shalt Not Kill? Individual Differences in Working Memory Capacity, Executive Control, and Moral Judgment. Psychological Science, 19, 549-557.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02122.x

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Dynamic Moral Judgments and Emotions
  • AUTHORS: Magda Osman
  • KEYWORDS: Moral Dilemmas, Dynamic, Emotions, Updating, Dual-Processes
  • JOURNAL NAME: Psychology DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.68090 Jun 25, 2015
  • ABSTRACT: We may experience strong moral outrage when we read a news headline that describes a prohibited action, but when we gain additional information by reading the main news story, do our emotional experiences change at all, and if they do in what way do they change? In a single online study with 80 participants the aim was to examine the extent to which emotional experiences (disgust, anger) and moral judgments track changes in information about a moral scenario. The evidence from the present study suggests that we systematically adjust our moral judgments and our emotional experiences as a result of exposure to further information about the morally dubious action referred to in a moral scenario. More specifically, the way in which we adjust our moral judgments and emotions appears to be based on information signalling whether a morally dubious act is permitted or prohibited.