Article citations

    J. Conesa-Munoz, A. Ribeiro, and G. Pajares, “A multi-path planning approach based on a genetic algorithm for a robot fleet working in arable crops,” in Proceedings of the Portuguese Conference on Artificial Intelligence (EPIA '11), 2011.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Minefield Mapping Using Cooperative Multirobot Systems
  • AUTHORS: Alaa Khamis,Asser ElGindy
  • JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Robotics DOI: 10.1155/2012/698046 Sep 16, 2014
  • ABSTRACT: This paper presents a team-theoretic approach to cooperative multirobot systems. The individual actions of the robots are controlled by the Belief-Desire-Intention model to endow the robots with the know-how needed to execute these actions deliberately. The cooperative behaviors between the heterogeneous robots are governed by the Team-Log theory to endow all the robots in the team with the know-how-to-cooperate and determine the team members’ commitments to each other despite their different types, properties, and goals. The proposed approach is tested for validity with the real life problem of minefield mapping. Different minefield sweeping strategies are studied to control the mobility of the mobile sweepers within the minefield in order to maximize the area coverage and improve picture compilation capability of the multirobot system. 1. Introduction Developing a robust and cooperative team of robots capable of solving complex tasks is an interesting area of research that attracts many researchers nowadays. Achieving robust and productive cooperation between various system components is inspired by different domains such as biology, artificial life, psychology, and cognitive science in order to build artificially cooperative intelligent systems. Cooperation is defined in [1] as a purposive positive interference of agents to further the achievement of a common goal or goals compatible with their own. To achieve this effective cooperation in multirobot systems (MRS), the robots must have know-how for solving simple problems in an autonomous way and a know-how-to-cooperate by which agents can share common interests and interact with each other to solve complex problems cooperatively. In recent years, scientific community has seen a great number of research works dedicated to cooperative multirobot systems and their applications in different areas such as search and rescue [2, 3], distributed surveillance [4], communication relaying [5], agriculture [6], sorting [7], emergency services [8], and landmine detection [9]. Minefield reconnaissance and mapping is one of the most promising applications of cooperative multirobot systems. In the context of humanitarian demining, cooperative multirobot systems can be beneficial for deminers, civilians, and government. The design of an accurate sensor may reduce the amount of time needed to determine whether a landmine exists, but does not increase the safety of the deminer. Since the safety issues during the eradication process are of great concern, the use and integration of cheap and simple mobile sweepers in