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Result-Based Management in the Public Sector: A Decade of Experience for the Tanzanian Executive Agencies

DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2011.44057, PP. 499-506

Keywords: Public Administration, Result-Based Management, NPM, Executive Agencies and Reform in Tanzania

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Abstract:

One element of the NPM-inspired reforms is the adoption of result-based management in the Tanzanian public sector. This paper examines the implementation of this type of reform by focusing on executive agencies. Executive agencies were especially created to be result-oriented public organizations. Our empirical question is whether or not and to what extent the management of executive agencies has shifted to result-based approach as promised by NPM-reform doctrine. Our findings indicate that result-based approach has only been partially implemented in the Tanzanian public sector. There is less emphasis on managing for results and management processes have continued to be predominantly based on inputs and processes.

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