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Postoperative Drains at the Donor Sites of Iliac-Crest Bone Grafts in Patients Who Had a Single Comminuted Long Bone Fracture

DOI: 10.4236/ss.2011.29095, PP. 437-441

Keywords: Drain, Surgery, Bone Graft, Fracture

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Abstract:

In this clinical trial, 90 patients admitted to orthopedics ward, Shahid Mohammadi Hospital, Bandar Abbass with a long bone fracture, comminuted more than 30%, were randomly divided into two groups. In the first group, after the completion of the operation, a single hemovaccum drain was inserted into the iliac crest wound, the site of cancellous bone removal, whereas the second group didn’t receive a drain. The two groups were followed for at least six months and the results were compared with Chi-Square and T-Tests. The two groups, at the end of the follow up period, had no statistically significant difference with regard to pain severity and need for dressing change (in the immediate postoperative period), hematoma formation and infection. So it seems that drain insertion in the wound of patients in whom cancellous bone is removed from the iliac crest, is not necessary.

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