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Kirari as Autobiography in Hausa Praise Poetry

DOI: 10.4236/als.2018.63010, PP. 120-134

Keywords: Hausa, Oral Autobiography, Kirari, Niger, Nigeria

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Abstract:

This study shows that autobiography exists in oral civilizations by exploring Kirari in Hausa praise poetry. The study focuses on the forms of Kirari that clearly bring out the autobiographical elements that illustrate the autobiographer’s conscious awareness of the singularity of his or her life and achievements and the uniqueness of their identity among the members of their community and/or profession. These forms of Kirari are identified in excerpts from Hausa hunters’ heroic self-praise and from Bakandamiya by the singer Maman Shata Katsina.

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