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The Dynamics of the Pulse Birth in an SIR Epidemic Model with Standard Incidence

DOI: 10.1155/2009/490437

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An SIR epidemic model with pulse birth and standard incidence is presented. The dynamics of the epidemic model is analyzed. The basic reproductive number ??? is defined. It is proved that the infection-free periodic solution is global asymptotically stable if ???<1. The infection-free periodic solution is unstable and the disease is uniform persistent if ???>1. Our theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. 1. Introduction Every year billions of population suffer or die of various infectious disease. Mathematical models have become important tools in analyzing the spread and control of infectious diseases. Differential equation models have been used to study the dynamics of many diseases in wild animal population. Birth is one of the very important dynamic factors. Many models have invariably assumed that the host animals are born throughout the year, whereas it is often the case that births are seasonal or occur in regular pulse, such as the blue whale, polar bear, Orinoco crocodile, Yangtse alligator, and Giant panda. The dynamic factors of the population usually impact the spread of epidemic. Therefore, it is more reasonable to describe the natural phenomenon by means of the impulsive differential equation [1, 2]. Roberts and Kao established an SI epidemic model with pulse birth, and they found the periodic solutions and determined the criteria for their stability [3]. In view of animal life histories which exhibit enormous diversity, some authors studied the model with stage structure and pulse birth for the dynamics in some species [4–6]. Vaccination is an effective way to control the transmission of a disease. Mathematical modeling can contribute to the design and assessment of the vaccination strategies. Many infectious diseases always take on strongly infectivity during a period of the year; therefore, seasonal preventing is an effective and practicable way to control infectious disease [7]. Nokes and Swinton studied the control of childhood viral infections by pulse vaccination [8]. Jin studied the global stability of the disease-free periodic solution for SIR and SIRS models with pulse vaccination [9]. Stone et al. presented a theoretical examination of the pulse vaccination policy in the SIR epidemic model [10]. They found a disease-free periodic solution and studied the local stability of this solution. Fuhrman et al. studied asymptotic behavior of an SI epidemic model with pulse removal [11]. d'Onofrio studied the use of pulse vaccination strategy to eradicate infectious disease for SIR and SEIR epidemic models [12–15]. Shi

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