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Cholesterol  2012 

The Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Patients with Spinal Cord Lesion in Thailand

DOI: 10.1155/2012/847462

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Objective. To assess the prevalence of dyslipidemia in 90 patients with spinal cord lesion (SCL) of duration greater than 2 years. The study was carried out from November 2007 to September 2008. Methods. Clinical history, physical examination, and lipid profiles were recorded and analyzed. Dyslipidemia was assessed using guidelines from the National Cholesterol Education Project Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III). Results. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in at least one lipid parameter was 76.7%. The most frequent finding was low HDL-C (58.9%). Hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia and high LDL-C were found in 28.9%, 26.7% and 21.1% of patients, respectively. The factors and age years were associated with high LDL-C ( and ). Patients who exercised less than 30 minutes per day had associated hypercholesterolemia ( ), hypertriglyceridemia ( ), and higher LDL-C ( ). Patients with BMI ?kg/m2 had associated hypercholesterolemia and high LDL-C. Age was a significant determinant of high LDL-C. BMI was the most powerful and significant determinant of hypercholesterolemia and high LDL-C. Conclusion. SCL patients should have a regular lipid checkup, especially those patients having the following risk factors: males, age years, BMI ?kg/m2 and exercise duration minutes per day. 1. Introduction There has been great improvement in therapeutic care for patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but patients still have lower-than-normal life expectancy. It has been found that life expectancy of tetraplegia and paraplegia is less than in the normal population [1]. The major established cause of death is cardiovascular disease [2, 3]. Whiteneck [4] reported that cardiovascular disease accounted for nearly half of all deaths in persons with spinal cord injury of duration greater than 30 years. Lee et al. [5] found that the prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease was 63.8% as determined by Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion single-photon emission-computed tomography (T201-SPECT). There are many important risk factors in developing cardiovascular disease such as a decrease in physical activity, obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and decreased cardiovascular fitness [6]. Dyslipidemia is one of the most important risk factors and can be modified for primary prevention in cardiovascular disease. In this study the prevalence of dyslipidemia was determined from ATP III guidelines which were developed from the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol

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