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The vitamin D receptor polymorphism in the translation initiation codon is a risk factor for insulin resistance in glucose tolerant Caucasians

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2350-2-2

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There were 18 FF, 21 Ff, and 10 ff subjects. Since only 10 ff subjects were identified, they were pooled with the Ff subjects during analyses. The FF and Ff/ff groups had similar glucose levels at each time point before and after a glucose challenge. The Ff/ff group had higher insulin levels than the FF group at fasting (P=0.006), 30 minutes (P=0.009), 60 minutes (P=0.049), and 90 minutes (P=0.042). Furthermore, the Ff/ff group also had a larger insulin area under the curve than the FF group (P=0.009). While no difference was noted in %B, the Ff/ff group had a lower %S than the FF group (0.53 vs. 0.78, P=0.006). A stepwise regression analysis confirmed that the Fok I polymorphism was an independent determinant for %S, accounting for 29.3% of variation in %S when combined with waist-hip ratio.We report that the Fok I polymorphism at the VDR gene locus is associated with insulin sensitivity, but has no influence on beta cell function in healthy Caucasians. Although this polymorphism has been shown to affect the activation of vitamin D-dependent transcription, the molecular basis of the association between this polymorphism and insulin resistance remains to be determined.Although conflicting findings about bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with type 2 diabetes have been reported, there are substantial data which support the notion that type 2 diabetes is associated with increased BMD [1,2,3]. The Rotterdam Study [2], which involved 5,931 subjects, including 243 men and 355 women with type 2 diabetes, provides the most convincing evidence. They found that diabetic men and women had increased BMD independent of age, obesity, the use of estrogen, thiazide, or loop diuretics, impairment in the ability of daily living, and smoking [2]. Furthermore, hyperinsulinemia has been reported to be associated with an increased BMD in diabetic [4] and non-diabetic subjects [5]. From the Rancho Bernardo Study [5], the level of fasting insulin was significantly and positively assoc

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