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A placebo-controlled trial of Korean red ginseng extract for preventing Influenza-like illness in healthy adults

DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-12-10

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Abstract:

We will conduct a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study at the onset of the influenza seasons. A total of 100 subjects 30-70 years of age will be recruited from the general populations. The subjects will be instructed to take 9 capsules per day of either the KRG extract or a placebo for a period of 3 months. The primary outcome measure is to assess the frequency of ILI onset in participated subjects. Secondary variable measures will be included severity and duration of ILI symptoms. The ILI symptoms will be scored by subjects using a 4-point scale.This study is a randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the KRG extract compared to placebo and will be provided valuable new information about the clinical and physiological effects of the KRG extract on reduction of ILI incidence including flu and upper respiratory tract infections. The study has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the study findings can be implemented into clinical practice if KRG extract can be shown to be an effective reduction strategy in ILI incidence.NCT01478009.Respiratory viruses are a major cause of influenza-like illness(ILI) symptoms in children and adults, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality each year [1-5]. The complications of ILI symptoms may occur in young children (< 1 year old) and elderly people (> 65 years old), even though ILI symptoms is most often self-limited and restrained to the upper respiratory tract [6-8]. The ILI symptoms is characterized by sudden onset of symptoms such as high fever (> 38°C) and cough in the absence of other diagnosis [9,10]. Other symptoms including myalgia, headache, chills and fatigue can only be used as optional inclusion criteria. Although it is known that rhinovirus infections cause 10% to 40% of the upper respiratory tract infection [11], with coronavirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus accounting for the remainder of cases [12,13], these viruses produce clinicall

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