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BODY BUILD AND BODY COMPOSITION VS. PHYSICAL CAPACITY IN YOUNG JUDO CONTESTANTS COMPARED TO UNTRAINED SUBJECTS

Keywords: judo athletes , body composition , aerobic and anaerobic capacities

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Abstract:

The aim of the present study was to (1) find differences in body build and aerobic and anaerobic capacity between young judoists and untrained peers; (2) compare correlations for indicators of body build with indicators of aerobic and anaerobic capacity among the group of trained and untrained subjects. The study group comprised 18 subjects selected during a competitive period, who had taken at least fifth place in national judo tournaments. Their training experience ranged from 6 to 11 years, 8 to 10 hours a week. The control group was composed of 18 untrained students from one of the schools included in the study. Their body height and mass (BM) did not differ compared to judoists. A body composition chart was employed for analysis of body build and body composition. Physiological investigations encompassed measurements of anaerobic (Wingate test) and aerobic (graded exercise test on cycle ergometer) capacity. Judo contestants are typically characterized by higher BMI, fat-free mass and fat-free mass index compared to the untrained. Compared to the group of untrained peers, young athletes in this sport are distinguished by the time needed to generate peak power. This difference is not observed in the indices characterising aerobic capacity. The level of the indices of body build and composition in young judo contestants shows a moderate and strong correlation with indices of anaerobic and aerobic capacity. The amount of total work in the Wingate test was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.65, p<0.01), fat-free mass index (r=0.63, p<0.01), body mass (r=0.49, p<0.05), fat mass index (r=0.49, p<0.05) and percentage of fat (r=0.48, p<0.05). Maximal peak anaerobic power was positively correlated with fat-free mass index (r=0.48, p<0.05) and percentage of fat (r=0.50, p<0.05). A strong negative correlation between ·VO2max with body mass (r=-0.75, p<0.001), BMI (r=-0.72, p<0.001), moderate correlation with PF%(r=-0.64, p<0.01), fat-free mass index (r=-0.52, p<0.05), and fat mass index (-0.67, p<0.01) were observed. Heart rate at the anaerobic threshold (%max) showed positive relationships with fat-free mass index (r=0.52, p<0.05). In the untrained subjects, only a negative relationship between BM and TOPP was observed (r=-0.48, p<0.05). These findings confirm interrelations between structural and functional parameters, developed through many years of training. Although physical capacity might affect the course of a fight, it should be considered....

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