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Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva

DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-5-455

Keywords: Odontogenic Cyst, Calcifying, Gingival neoplasms, Odontogenic tumors

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Abstract:

Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected.All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated.A calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is an extremely rare benign cystic neoplasm that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells that have the potential to undergo calcification [1]. Originally, CCOTs were referred to as calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC). The structure was first described by Gorlin in 1962 as a distinct entity and was therefore called Gorlin cyst [2]. COC was considered as a developmental odontogenic cyst in the jaw. In their first report, Gorlin et al. [2] considered this lesion to be a possible analogue of the cutaneous calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe (the pilomatrixoma). COC accounted for approximately 1% of jaw cysts. In 1981, Praetorius et al. [3] studied and reevaluated 16 cases of COC and proposed that the group actually contained two entities, a cyst and a neoplasm. Since then, neoplastic potential has been investigated.In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) designated Gorlin’s cyst as a tumor and described it as belonging to a group of related neoplasms, including the benign cystic-type (CCOT), the benign solid-type dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and the malignant ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma [1]. The dentino

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