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Critical Care  2010 

Substitution of exudative trace element losses in burned children

DOI: 10.1186/cc9198

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Abstract:

Major burn injuries are associated with trace element deficiencies, which lead to impaired wound healing and infectious complications. Low plasma levels of zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) are inadequately compensated for during hospitalization [1], and enteral supplements are unsuccessful in correcting the status [2]. Additionally, there are currently no clear recommendations regarding trace element requirements in children. The aim of the present study was to determine if our trace element supplementation policy for adults adapted to total body surface area would achieve normalization of plasma concentrations of trace elements in burned children.Burned children admitted to the paediatric and adult ICU were enrolled after approval by the Institutional Ethics Committee and parental informed consent. Park-land formula was used for fluid resuscitation during the first 24 hours in addition to basal fluid requirements (1,800 ml/m2). Target nutrition from 36 to 48 hours was: 3 to 5 year olds, 70 to 90 kcal/kg/day; over 5 year olds, 50 to 70 kcal/kg/day; teenagers, 40 kcal/kg/day. A normal saline solution containing Cu, selenium (Se), and Zn (Table 1) [3] was infused continuously first within 12 hours of injury and then over 8 hours per day for 7 to 15 days at a dose of 250 ml/1.70 m2/day along with a standard parenteral multi-trace element preparation. In addition, children admitted to the paediatric ICU received vitamin C 30 mg/kg/day and vitamin E 1.5 mg/kg/day; teenagers managed in the adult ICU received vitamin C 10.8 mg/kg/day and vitamin E 8.3 mg/kg/day (Table 1). The length of mechanical ventilation, and ICU and hospital length of stay were recorded.The characteristics of all those enrolled, mean daily total trace element dose, per kilogram dose, and duration of supplementation are shown in Table 2. Figure 1 shows the individual plasma values of the four patients while in the ICU. Both teenagers (patients 3 and 4) who received additional enteral trace elements had the lo

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