All Title Author
Keywords Abstract


Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Diethyl Sebacate in a Topical Antimycotic Medicament

DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2012.23040, PP. 216-218

Keywords: Allergic Contact Dermatitis, Patch Test, Allergen, Diethyl Sebacate, Safety Evaluation

Full-Text   Cite this paper   Add to My Lib

Abstract:

Diethyl sebacate is used in topical medicaments in United States and Japan. We described a case of allergic contact dermatitis from diethyl sebacate in a topical antimycotic medicament. Allergic reaction to diethyl sebacate is likely more common because our group has found three of eight sensitized cases. We believe that an investigation regarding the sensitized frequency to diethyl sebacate would conduct to improve the safety of products in United States and Japan.

References

[1]  T. Narita, N. Oiso, T. Ota, S. Kawara and A. Kawada, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Due to Diethyl Sebacate in a Hand Cream,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 55, No. 2, 2006, p. 117. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2006.0866d.x
[2]  K. W. Schneider, “Contact Dermatitis Due to Diethyl Sebacate,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 6, No. 7, 1980, pp. 506-507. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1980.tb05586.x
[3]  M. Kimura and M. A. Kawada, “Contact Dermatitis Due to Diethyl Sebacate,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 40, No. 1, 1999, pp. 48-49. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1999.tb05978.x
[4]  E. Sasaki, M. Hata, J. Aramaki and M. Honda, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Due to Diethyl Sebacate,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 36, No. 3, 1997, p. 172. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1997.tb00412.x
[5]  M. Tanaka, S. Kobayashi, T. Murata, A. Tanikawa and T. Nishikawa, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Diethyl Sebacate in Lanoconazole Cream,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 43, No. 4, 2000, pp. 233-234.
[6]  F. Soga, N. Katoh and S. Kishimoto, “Contact Dermatitis Due to Lanoconazole, Cetyl Alcohol and Diethyl Sebacate in Lanoconazole Cream,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 50, No. 1, 2004, pp. 49-50. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2004.00271j.x
[7]  T. Ota, N. Oiso, Y. Iba, T. Narita, S. Kawara and A. Kawada, “Concomitant Development of Photoallergic Contact Dermatitis from Ketoprofen and Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Menthol and Rosin (Colophony) in a Compress,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 56, No. 1, 2007, pp. 47-48. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.00940.x
[8]  T. Rindo, N. Oiso, Y. Yamadori, H. Hirao, S. Kawara and A. Kawada, “Photoallergic Contact Dermatitis Due to Ketoprofen and Hydrogenated Rosin Glycerol Ester,” Case Reports in Dermatology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2010, pp. 36-39. doi:10.1159/000305052
[9]  N. Oiso, K. Fukai and M. Ishii, “Triple Allergic Contact Sensitivities Due to Ferbinac, Crotamiton and Diisopropanolamine,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 49, No. 5, 2003, pp. 261-263. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2003.0225e.x
[10]  T. Rind, N. Oiso, A. Hirao and A. Kawada, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis with Diffuse Erythematous Reaction from Diisopropanolamine in a Compress,” Case Reports in Dermatology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2010, pp. 50-54. doi:10.1159/000313430
[11]  N. Oiso and A. Kawada, “Review of Allergic and Photoallergic Contact Dermatitis from an Ingredient in a Medicament Vehicle Consisting of a Compress, Poultice, Plaster, and Tape,” Journal of Allergy, Vol. 2011, 2011, Article ID: 169432. doi:10.1155/2011/169432
[12]  S. Erdmann, M. Hertl and H. F. Merk, “Contact Dermatitis from Clotrimazole with Positive Patch-Test Reactions Also to Croconazole and Itraconazole,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 40, No. 1, 1999, pp. 47-48. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1999.tb05977.x
[13]  M. Shono, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Luliconazole,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 56, No. 5, 2007, pp. 296-297. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2006.01023.x
[14]  N. Oiso, F. Fukai and M. Ishii, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Caused by Parabens in a Compress,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 50, No. 5, 2004, p. 317. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2004.00341d.x
[15]  N. Oiso, K. Fukai and M. Ishii, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Due to 1,3-Butylene Glycol in Medicaments,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2004, pp. 40-41. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2004.0378h.x
[16]  N. Oiso, T. Ota, E. Yoshinaga, H. Endo, S. Kawara and A. Kawada, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Mimicking Atopic Dermatitis Due to Enoxolone in a Topical Medicament,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 54, No. 6, 2006, p. 351. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2006.0645i.x
[17]  J. C. Nguyen, G. Chesnut, W. D. James and M. Saruk, “Allergic Contact Dermatitis Caused by Lanolin (Wool) Alcohol Contained in an Emollient in Three Postsurgical Patients,” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 62, No. 6, pp. 1064-1065. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2009.10.020
[18]  S. Cheng, M. Cao, Y. Zhang, S. Peng, J. Dong, D. Zhang, Z. Jiang and Y. He, “Time Trends of Contact Allergy to a Modified European Baseline Series in Beijing between 2001 and 2006,” Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 65, No. 1, 2011, pp. 22-27. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2011.01897.x
[19]  E. Dastychová, M. Necas and V. Vasku, “Contact Hypersensitivity to Selected Excipients of Dermatological Topical Preparations and Cosmetics in Patients with Chronic Eczema,” Acta Dermatovenerol Alp Panonica Adriat, Vol. 17, No. 2, 2008, pp. 61-68.
[20]  E. M. Warshaw, D. D. Nelsen, H. I. Maibach, J. G. Marks, K. A. Zug, J. S. Taylor, R. L. Rietschel, J. F. Fowler, C. G. Mathias, M. D. Pratt, D. Sasseville, F. J. Storrs, D. V. Belsito and V. A. De Leo, “Positive Patch Test Reactions to Lanolin: Cross-Sectional Data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994 to 2006,” Dermatitis, Vol. 20, No. 2, 2009, pp. 79-88.

Full-Text

comments powered by Disqus