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Increasing numbers of medical undergraduates from lower socioeconomic backgrounds: positive for health care?

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S42814

Keywords: Increasing numbers of medical undergraduates from lower socioeconomic backgrounds: positive for health care? Letter (436) Total Article Views Authors: Lemon TI, Stone BA Published Date March 2013 Volume 2013:4 Pages 39 - 41 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S42814 Received: 15 January 2013 Accepted: 04 February 2013 Published: 21 March 2013 TI Lemon, B A Stone Cardiff University, School of Medicine, Cochrane Medical Education Centre, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales Economic stagnation in the UK has

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Increasing numbers of medical undergraduates from lower socioeconomic backgrounds: positive for health care? Letter (436) Total Article Views Authors: Lemon TI, Stone BA Published Date March 2013 Volume 2013:4 Pages 39 - 41 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S42814 Received: 15 January 2013 Accepted: 04 February 2013 Published: 21 March 2013 TI Lemon, B A Stone Cardiff University, School of Medicine, Cochrane Medical Education Centre, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales Economic stagnation in the UK has been a prominent issue for the last five years, leading to an increase in unemployment and a subsequent rise of numbers in the lower socioeconomic classes.1 Seyan et al2 have shown that students from the lower socioeconomic classes are under-represented in medical schools. However, their study was carried out in a time of economic prosperity, and we suggest that this is reversed in times of economic deprivation, to the benefit of patients. Adaptation theory3 suggests that an organism suffering change in their environment will adapt to change and become better suited to survival. In this case, the organism is the adolescent population of the UK, the change in environment is the economic downturn, and in turn, their adaptation is to turn to professional jobs in order to provide themselves with secure income and live happier and healthier lives. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that we will see growing numbers of medical students coming from the lower socioeconomic classes in the near future. Read the original study here Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Validation study of a computer-based open surgical trainer: SimPraxis simulation platform Determinants of physical activity in primary school students using the health belief model Comparison of two ultrasonic coagulating shears in sealing pulmonary vessels Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses Lung toxicities of core–shell nanoparticles composed of carbon, cobalt, and silica Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells Undergraduate radiology education in private and public teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan: teaching duties, methodologies, and rewards

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