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Hypotensive response after water-walking and land-walking exercise sessions in healthy trained and untrained women

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S23094

Keywords: water-based exercise, post-exercise hypotension, blood pressure, cardiovascular response, normotensive women A Letter to the Editor has been published for this article.

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tensive response after water-walking and land-walking exercise sessions in healthy trained and untrained women Original Research (4605) Total Article Views Authors: Rodriguez D, Silva V, Prestes J, Rica RL, Serra AJ, Bocalini DS, Pontes FL Jr Published Date August 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 549 - 554 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S23094 Daniel Rodriguez1, Valter Silva2, Jonato Prestes3, Roberta Luksevicius Rica4, Andrey Jorge Serra5, Danilo Sales Bocalini6, Francisco Luciano Pontes Junior7 1S o Judas Tadeu University, S o Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2College of Physical Education of Sorocaba, Sorocaba, SP, Brazil; 3Graduation Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia-DF, Brazil; 4Department of Physical Education, Arbos College, S o Bernardo do Campo, SP, Brazil; 5Department of Physical Education and Laboratory of Rehabilitation Science, Nove de Julho University, S o Paulo, SP, Brazil; 6Department of Medicine, Federal University of S o Paulo – Escola Paulista de Medicina, S o Paulo, SP, Brazil; 7School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of S o Paulo, S o Paulo, SP, Brazil Background: The aim of this study was to compare post-exercise hypotension after acute sessions of water-walking and land-walking in healthy trained and untrained women. Methods: Twenty-three untrained (n = 12) and trained (n = 11) normotensive women performed two walking sessions in water and on land at 40% of peak VO2 for 45 minutes. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were measured 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the exercise sessions. Results: No differences were found between the groups for age and anthropometric parameters, but peak VO2 for the trained women (45 ± 8 mL/kg/minute) was higher than for the untrained women (31 ± 3 mL/kg/minute). No differences were found between the groups with regard to systolic and diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure after water immersion. The heart rate in the trained group (62 ± 3 beats per minute [bpm]) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than in the untrained group (72 ± 4 bpm) on land, and after water immersion, this difference disappeared (58 ± 5 bpm in the trained women and 66 ± 5 bpm in the untrained women). Sixty minutes after water-walking, systolic blood pressure (108 ± 8 mmHg vs 97 ± 3 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (69 ± 5 mmHg vs 62 ± 5 mmHg), and mean arterial pressure (82 ± 6 mmHg vs 74 ± 4 mmHg) decreased significantly with rest in the untrained group, and no differences were found after land-walking. In the trained group, significant (P < 0.05) differences were found only for systolic blood pressure (110 ± 9 mmHg vs 100 ± 9 mmHg) after 60 minutes of water-walking; decreases in systolic blood pressure were found after 45 minutes (99 ± 7 mmHg) and 60 minutes (99 ± 6 mmHg) compared with rest (107 ± 5 mmHg) after land-walking. Conclusion: Single water-walking and land-walking sessions induced important hypotension following exercise. Additionally,

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