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Time Allocation as Correlate of Undergraduates’ Academic Achievement in Cataloguing and Classification in Library Schools in Southern Nigeria

DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1101915, PP. 1-10

Subject Areas: Education

Keywords: Time Allocation, Academic Achievement, Cataloguing and Classification, Library Schools, Southern Nigeria

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Abstract

The study focuses on time allocation as correlate of undergraduates’ academic achievement in cataloguing and classification in library schools in Southern Nigeria. Cataloguing and classification courses are expected to be taught theoretically and practically in library schools. The main problem of this study is undergraduates’ poor academic achievement in cataloguing and classification. According to authors, cataloguing and classification are core courses in librarianship. Despite the importance of these courses in the library schools, it is observed that many undergraduates are known to perform poorly in the examinations. Survey research design of correlational type was adopted for this study. Hypothesis tested at 0.05 level of significance was that there was no significant relationship between time allocation and academic achievement of undergraduates in cataloguing in library schools in Southern Nigeria. The 550 final year students and 18 lecturers teaching cataloguing and classification in library schools in Southern Nigeria were purposively selected for the study. Time allocated for teaching and learning cataloguing and classification scale (a = 0.64) and students’ achievement test in cataloguing and classification (a = 0.63) were used to collect data for the study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for the data analysis. Results from the study revealed that: there was a significant relationship between time allocation and academic achievement of undergraduates in cataloguing and classification in library schools. Time allocated for teaching cataloguing and classification was inadequate. Academic achievement of the majority of the undergraduates was at average level. The library school management in partnership with the National Universities Commission (NUC) should include separate hour on the time table for practical cataloguing and classification in library schools in Nigeria to enable students to balance theory with practical knowledge. This is necessary to enhance students’ academic achievement in cataloguing and classification. Lecturers’ teaching cataloguing and classification should spend more time in cataloguing practicals to encourage the students to develop interest in cataloguing and classification.

Cite this paper

Ogunniyi, S. O. and Nwalo, K. I. N. (2016). Time Allocation as Correlate of Undergraduates’ Academic Achievement in Cataloguing and Classification in Library Schools in Southern Nigeria. Open Access Library Journal, 3, e1915. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1101915.

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